Jump to content

Hasegawa 1/72 Dauntless SBD- 3: Cockpit Detail Set Issue


Highlander
 Share

Recommended Posts

I have once again had an experience that is causing me to dump a kit and put modelling on the back shelf.

 

For some time, I have been attempting to move up from OOB to building kits with some aftermarket...to increase the detail and realism. It has not gone well.

 

I started a Hasegawa 1/72 SBD-3. I purchased a True Details "SBD Dauntless Cockpit Detail Set" -- for "Hasegawa Kits". I just spend the afternoon tediously sawing away at the resin and, after a bit, cut out the cockpit floor. I test fitted it between the fuselage halves and .... it is way too big. I don't see how I can possibly add the cockpit resin sides to built the cockpit tub and have any chance of getting it to fit into the fuselage. No matter how much I sand.

 

I then noted that the True Details instruction sheet states that the detail set is for the SBD-4. That information was not on the exterior packaging at all. This is making me wonder if the cockpit size for the Hasegawa SBD-4 is significantly larger than for the SBD-3. I doubt it, but I don't know.

 

This is not the first time that I have had a similar experience. So, in general, how bad is fit and accuracy in aftermarket aircraft offerings? And, specifically, does anyone who had built the SBD-3 with the True Details cockpit have any suggestions?

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The fit of resin parts is always a crap shoot! I've attended several seminars and talked to resin makers over the years and they all will tell you that due to a number of variants (specific resin mix, temperature, humidity, molding time, angle of the sun, the way they were holding their mouth that day, etc..) there's almost always some shrinkage in the parts that causes them not to fit as designed. Though shrinkage is the most common reaction, I'm guessing expansion could also happen. The point is that the molded parts are almost never an exact match to the scratchbuilt parts they're cast from.

 

The other problem is that (believe it or not) the thickness of the injection molded plastic can vary from production batch to production batch, for many of the same reasons cited above. If you got a Dauntless from a different molding batch than the one used to design the resin parts, that will exaggerate the size differences. There's every chance that your kit has thicker side walls than the one used when the parts for the resin casting were built into their Dauntless.

 

I'm surprised though that you have a width problem too big for some sanding to solve. Are you sure there are no protrusions on the fuselage interior that need removing? Many resin interior sets require you to scrape/sand/cut off/grind off almost any and all interior molded detailing before beginning to put the new parts in place. If that's not the case, you may consider having to thin the interior plastic with a motor tool to create the room for the resin parts.

 

Also, double check to see if your side panels shouldn't be fitting on top of the sides of the floor, as opposed to fitting the floor between the sides. That could make a significant difference in the "width" problem you may be facing, or reduce the problems you anticipate.

 

Many people think that resin parts should be a "drop fit" replacement; and the manufacturers try to design them that way. However, experience shows that they seldom achieve that goal. Most resin sets require some sort of sanding and adjusting to get a set to fit, and there are those that just do not fit at all. Let's hope yours is simply one that requires more elbow grease and not one that cannot be salvaged. Hope this helps a little!

 

GIL :smiley16:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I really appreciate the feedback.

 

I will check on the positioning of the side panels on the top of the floor versus between the sides. I don't think it will solve the problem, however, since the side panels seemed to have fit into notches on the side of the fuselage floor. And, even without the side panels, my dry fit indicated the resin floor was too wide.

 

There is apparently a Jaguar resin kit out there, circa 2000, which has a good reputation, but I have been unable to locate it.

 

Thanks again.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The only difference in the 1/72 Hasegawa Dauntless kits is the section forward of the cockpit (provided as separate pieces, differing in the various releases.) I built one many moons ago, and I had the TD set, but I don't recall how well it fit (or not.) I also had the Jaguar set, with I may have used instead.

 

Steve Nelson

IPMS #30925

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You should always check to make sure there are better manufacturers of a cockpit before purchasing True Details, I found Verlinden and Aires to be a far superior product. Having said that, you really have to work the resin and your fuselage halves, It isn't meant to be a snap-it-in job, and I do believe resin makers assume that people purchasing their products have a bit of scratch building experience, or are at least experienced model builders. I have had to do some crazy stuff with resin such as run hot water over it while using clothes pins to hold and shape it to my fuselage sides. You have to be careful that the water is not too hot, so experience comes with trial and error, Don't be afraid to dig in and try things, this is how we all learn. Watch a few YouTube videos and get some tips. I find watching videos much more informative than getting replies such as this on a forum.

I'm using a 1/32 Grand Phoenix Productions cockpit designed for Hasegawa on my 1/32 Matchbox Bf/109E-3. It wasn't a perfect fit, so I modified, but this seems to be par for the course regardless of make or model
.


different%20angle%20shaping%20pit.jpg

Edited by spiralcity
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's a good tip for thick resin and removing unwanted material: Use a Dremel tool with a cut-off wheel or a sanding disk, it will save you so much time. Just cut a bit long, then sand off the remainder. It takes only minutes as compared to an hour of sawing then another of sanding.

 

If your floor is too wide, you should easily be able to mod it to fit. Even if your inside walls are too high, they can be modified to fit. I would be concerned about too short and too narrow, but even then you can add on. A few pics of the problem would help.

 

I couldn't add the second photo above, but this was the process for a fit on my kit.

 

hot%20water%20for%20good%20measure_2.jpg

Edited by spiralcity
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...