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I acquired this Jn-4 (1/48th) as part of an estate. It was stored in a cardboard box from 1979 to Jan, 2008. It wasn't in bad shape but not good shape either. The paint and decals were removed with brake fluid and the raised detail for decal placement was removed. The top wing was removed to make the clean-up and subsequent restoration a bit easier.

In the last few days the model was made ready for painting. A darker green was applied and allowed to dry. Mask was applied over the ribs and a lighter coat was applied. The result is a simulated ribbing effect. Photos reveal that in sunlight one could easily see through the wings and see the internal structure. I think this is either an Aurora or Lindberg kit. Anyone know for sure?

 

Tapingribsfinished.jpg

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The plastic was molded in green. Perhaps someone has an original Lindberg or Aurora and will let me know.

 

I'm thinking its Lindberg.

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Mike,

That's the one....same configuration on the engine, cowl straps, and other details.

 

Here's the latest pic showing the cockpits.

 

interior.jpg

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The Lindberg biplanes were heads and shoulders above the rest of their kits! Years ago (pre Roden, Eduard, etc) when I wanted to build an SE-5A I compared the 1/48 Aurora and Lindberg kits. The Lindberg kit was not only better detailed, it also had better fidelity of detail, such as thinner trailing edges, etc.. The Jenny is looking good Dick! Keep the posts coming!

 

GIL :smiley16:

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The short struts have been aligned and attached, and the upper wing has been glued into place. The brace is a home-made design.

With luck I'll get the eight main wing braces attached later this evening.

AttachingUpperWing.jpg

 

And below, the Jenny has been removed from the alignment brace and awaits the insertion of the eight main wing struts.

MVC-023S.jpg

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The jig is a piece of pressed wood with squares drawn at 1 inch intervals. Holes were drilled at each intersection. Bolts are inserted upward so that the nex nuts can be adjusted from above. Popsicle sticks were drilled to fit over the bolts. Adjusting the hex nuts up/down serves to hold the model at the chosen height above the work surface...although I did not add any lateral attachments....would be easy but I don't find it necessary.

I have the bolts too closely spaced in the pic....they would work as as well sif they were seven or eight inches aprart and it would be easier to reach the model without having to work around the bolts.

Took about 15 min to get the jig built.

 

Work on the Jenny will be suspended for awhile. The PE sets for the TSR-2 (a review item) just arrived and that has priority.

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Dick,

 

Boy - Thanks for the GREAT TIP on how to do biplane wings (a daunting task to many of us).

 

Your idea fits into the "Geez.. Why didn't I think of that?!" - and I'm an engineer too!

 

Psst - On my next trip to the Hardware Store I know what I'm gonna buy...

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No worries.... I plan to begin using rubber bands and even EZ line to bind and hold the the model in the lateral dimension as needs dictate. I also plan on switching from hex nuts to wing nuts if I can find that the wings on the wing nuts won't be in the way. If I had the money I'd buy one of the professionally manufactured jigs...both I don't, so I won't.

One thing I've learned is that the better the tool one uses the better the finished product, and this jig and my home-made spray booth are....ah.....not at the professional level.

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