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1:72 Mikr Mir CAM-23


Roktman
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Being one of the fans of "oddball" aircraft I recently took this gem out of my To Do pile -

 

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This was featured in a SAMI article. As the author mentioned it's hard to get any info from the instructions as it's all written in Russian. There is also very little on this on the net. One thought it might be a trainer. Another went a little further and said "It seems this was a proposed ground attack/support aircraft with a unique twist. The rear wheel was on a long arm running the length of the fuselage. In flight, it was extended down to the ground and the concept was it would be a crude terrain following device. Somehow a secondary arm attached to the main arm was directly linked to the elevator. When the wheel rolling on the ground compressed as the terrain changed upward, it would cause the elevator to automatically adjust the plane’s height to keep it at a constant ground hugging level."

Lets get started. First, this model is tiny. Here we have the simple cockpit built. I even drilled out the lightening holes. The other pieces shown are all that there is of the fuselage --

 

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The fuselage is really small -

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To end this session, here's the fuselage and the wing with the engine nacelle being held on while the glue dries -

 

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Next, the tail went on as did the the boom underneath the fuselage -

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Today I got out the colors and started painting. The color call outs on the instructions listed "AMT" paints. Here's where I had my problem. I use Vallejo paints, and there are no conversions from AMT to Vallejo. Online, I found an AMT to RLM conversion. Then on the Vallejo website, I was able to look up the RLM to Vallejo conversion. As a sidebar between V's Model Color and Model Air, all the RLM colors are carried.

My color for the top of the plane turned out to be MC098 Bronze Green (RLM 70) and the bottom is MC064 Pale Blue (RLM 65). BTW, When I refer the MC number - that's the Position number as it's much easier to ID than the stock number.
The Pale Blue is the typical underneath color that is seen on a number of WW2 planes. The Bronze Green was a little weird. It goes on looking a deep gray, but then dries with a greenish tone.

 

I masked off the top of the fuselage to paint the bottom and the boom and then removed the masking to prepare for the next day. when I got to painting all it took was one shot of the ab to help me remember that I never masked off the painted bottom. DOH! --

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Oh well I just kept going, and then masked to top again and repainted the bottom. I then hit it with some Vallejo glass and added the decals -

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Oh yeah, I also added those pistons - or whatever they are supposed to be on the engine nacelle. The edges of the decals showed a little silvering which I will need to take care of.

 

Finally, I took some MIG pigments and mixed it with some water and then ran the mix into the panel lines on the green surfaces. Since I can't find out if this is an experimental plane or not, I didn't want it too beat up looking. For the Light Blue on the bottom I tried a little trick that I saw on You Tube in that I traced the panel lines with a 4B pencil and then smudged it with a cotton bud.

I then airbrushed another layer of Vallejo's Matt Clear and the silvering around the decals finally disappeared.
With that done I added the wheels, the canopy which needed a little Kristal Klear, and the propeller. Then there was two little spots on the boom that I painted on some Vallejo Air Steel, and highlighted the pistons (or whatever) with some VA Aluminum. Its done. Weird, the lights are making my Bronze Green paint look a blue color. Hmmm...

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Thanks for looking.

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That's a new one on me! Looks like you got as much from that crude kit as a body could, so congrats are definitely in order.

 

This does beg the question though...if the trailing tail wheel rolling on the ground activated the elevator to keep the plane at a constant height...how was it ever able to land?? :smiley3: Inquiring minds need to know! :smiley2:

 

Nice build! :smiley32:

 

GIL :smiley16:

Edited by ghodges
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With that kind of terrain following system, I'm sure landing would be the least of your problems! I can't imagine dragging a stick behind my plane going along at around 200 MPH and expect it or the plane to survive! What a really weird, wacky,cool model though. Nice job man!

 

Mikro-Mir is the new king of weird model kits,, a title previously held by MPM.

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Thanks guys.

 

I think I got lucky. The author of the SAMI article had a tough time with his. The only thing I changed on mine was the two "brace bars" holding the arm in the front. The parts with the kit were too thin for me to get off the sprue without breaking. The guy in the article got his off the sprue but the parts were too short. Besides that, it was fairly effortless. I would say that if anyone comes across the kit and wants t try it - go ahead.

 

Re: how the boom etc... works. I have no idea. MIKR-MIR has a whole page about the craft (I guess) - but I can't read it, nor tried to get it translated --

 

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If someone can read it, I'd like to hear the story.

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