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1) You don't have to use superglue to place cockpit PE. It's not really under any "stress" so you can use white glue, epoxy, or even Future to stick them in place. That lessens the chance of getting something stuck where you don't want it!

 

2) If the parts you're using need to be bent or rolled, annealing them will make them more "pliable" and take the spring out of the metal. Anneal them by setting the parts (the whole tree) onto the burner on the stove while it's on med-high. When the metal discolors it's done.

 

3) Paint them like any other parts, but be aware that sometimes the paint will rub off easier (compared to painted plastic) during handling.

 

4) You might want to put the tree into a LARGE (gallon size) clear plastic bag while you cut off a part. That way, if it goes flying, it stays in the baggie!

 

5) If you anticipate doing a lot of PE stuff in the future, a "hold and fold" tool of some sort would be a good investment. You can always get the job done with a steel ruler and a #11 knife, but multiple bends are easier to do on a platform designed to help with that operation.

 

I'm sure others will be along with more helpfull info! Hope this helps!

 

GIL :smiley16:

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1) You don't have to use superglue to place cockpit PE. It's not really under any "stress" so you can use white glue, epoxy, or even Future to stick them in place. That lessens the chance of getting something stuck where you don't want it!

 

2) If the parts you're using need to be bent or rolled, annealing them will make them more "pliable" and take the spring out of the metal. Anneal them by setting the parts (the whole tree) onto the burner on the stove while it's on med-high. When the metal discolors it's done.

 

3) Paint them like any other parts, but be aware that sometimes the paint will rub off easier (compared to painted plastic) during handling.

 

4) You might want to put the tree into a LARGE (gallon size) clear plastic bag while you cut off a part. That way, if it goes flying, it stays in the baggie!

 

5) If you anticipate doing a lot of PE stuff in the future, a "hold and fold" tool of some sort would be a good investment. You can always get the job done with a steel ruler and a #11 knife, but multiple bends are easier to do on a platform designed to help with that operation.

 

I'm sure others will be along with more helpfull info! Hope this helps!

 

GIL :smiley16:

Thanks Gil for the input.

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I'll agree with Gil on everything but would offer some caution on item #2.

I've used pre-painted (like Eduard) etched brass, which CAN'T be heated without destroying the paint.

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Guest Chrgr440RT

I've heard that soaking the tree in some vinegar or other mildly acidic solution will give the smooth metal parts some "tooth" to hold paint better. You don't want it to be too strong or else it will ruin the part.

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Sanding the whole sheet before you remove any parts will help with adhesion, for gluing and painting. Just lay the etch fret on a sheet of 600 grit and move it back and forth a couple of times. The sand paper needs to be bigger than the etch sheet, or else the edges will catch the etch and bend it up.

 

Also, primer will help with making the paint a little more durable. I use Mr. Surfacer sprayed on lightly.

Of course none of this will be of any use with the pre-painted stuff......

 

Cheers,

John

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  • 2 weeks later...
Thanks for all the tips,I really appreciate them but working with 1/72 pe ain't exactly a whole lot of fun. :smiley13:

 

I know how you feel. I have lost some parts under my fingernails. :smiley22:

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