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An F-86A Sabre. I was enthralled by serial number 48-178 flying in England last year (on You Tube) and scheduled to be delivered to a new owner in the U.S. soon.

 

Mark

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Oh yes, for ghod's sake, a decent 1/72 B-1B! I'll call that one a Cold War bird.

AMEN - Have been casting about for an accurate set of BONE 'burner cans for this in 1/72. Their sizing is unique and the feathers went away right before the hostile take-over of SAC by T.ACC in 1992.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I know this has been 'put before, but the Cold War era absolutely needs:

 

1/72 AGE gear and various flightline vehicles, such as six-pack pickup trucks, fire engines, Chevy Suburban and such. These guys are off to a very good start: http://www.aim72.co.uk/page71.html

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  • 11 months later...
  • 1 month later...

"A certain pointed-nose, supersonic bomber, from the central section of the North American continent: The BONE - !!!"

 

(Ref: Super-fans)

Edited by VonL
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  • 1 year later...

I don't like 72nd scale jet bombers. They are still 2ft long (vs. 3 for the 1/48 Revell B-1B) and, if the new B-2 spirit is anything to go by, you're looking at 150-170 bucks which is simply not affordable for most. You have to over engineer them or they get floppity and that often leads to massive shape errors (Monogram B-1'B').

 

For the B-1 there at additional hassles in that it is rare to see the jets on the ground without wings forward and surfaces deployed as well as the inlet doors open. So if you want an accurate, interesting looking, model which attracts the eye, you have to think about extra parts that drives price and increases complexity.

 

Conversely, traditional 'airliner scales', like 1/144 and 1/200, lead to bluff, toylike, features on such things as landing gear tires and weapons and for the size (under 1ft), often seem outrageously expensive as with the Dragon/Panda B-1B at 44 bucks and the Trumpeter Tu-95 at 37.

 

However; 1/100, as exemplified by the Tamiya B-52D/F, might be an affordable alternative. It's half of 1/48 (which is the American Scale) and it's still going to result in a 16-17" model which is displayable without a ceiling hook while giving you a decent impression of a big jet.

 

Think about it. The scale is virtually unpopulated, you could get a B-2, B-1A, B-1B, B-21, B-52G/H, KC-135, KC-46, C-17, RB-70, SR-71, R1 Sentinel, R.99 Aerieye, U-2R/S, RQ/MQ-4, XB-35/49 etc. And at 50-60 bucks each, they are still easy ways to recover tooling investment at a relatively low total run size.

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