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The Monitor HMS Roberts


JohnRatzenberger
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Monitors grew out of the bomb ketches of the late 17th century and then from Ericsson's Monitor of the ACW. Designed to provide bombardment and naval gunfire support, they evolved into a peculiar form of warship with a couple very heavy guns, low draft to get close inshore, broad beam for stability and torpedo/mine protection, and high structures for observing the fall of shots -- they were also slow.

 

HMS Roberts was one of two monitors of the WW2 Roberts class, the other being Abercrombie. Interestingly, the WW1 Monitor HMS Roberts was of the Abercrombie class. Roberts was completed in 1941 and served in the Med and Europe. She has two 15inch main guns (the turret/guns were reused from the WW1 monitor Marshal Soulte), 4 dual 4inch HAA guns, 3 pom-pom mounts (1 8-barrel, 2 quad), and 20 20mm guns although I'm having trouble finding more than 18 in any plans.

 

Roberts, as part of Bombarding Force D, supported D-Day off Sword Beach on 6 June until the right gun burst late in the day. She returned to Portsmouth for repair on the 7th and was back on station by the 26th. One of her guns is outside the IWM.

 

Combrig 70291 HMS Roberts Monitor, WW2

 

cbg700-roberts-01_boxart.jpg

 

Not too many parts, and many aren't very big. They look well done and I do not see any breakage so we're off to a good start. I have assorted generic 700-scale photoetch & resin details to add on.

 

The instructions can best be classed as hints - there is a one page top/side drawing and a one-half page assembly diagram. Please note they have greatly uncluttered the instructions by not using part numbers .

 

cbg700-roberts-03_instr2.jpg

 

There are no decals and no painting instructions. I have done some research to come up with what I believe the proper scheme.

 

And after a month or so ... a little sloppy around the railings, rigging, and antenna, but .

 

cbg700-roberts-90_done3.jpg

 

The rigging and antennae on the mast are representative, not complete in any regard .

 

cbg700-roberts-91_done2.jpg

 

I don't have a 700 scale white ensign to fly - I will have to fix that .

 

cbg700-roberts-92_done1.jpg

 

cbg700-roberts-92_done2.jpg

 

 

I'm happy enough, it's not going onto a contest floor anywhere. Gave me the opportunity to learn some new historical stuff and finally complete a 1/700 ship kit .

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I'm working on the Trumpeter 1/350 Roberts for a review, so it is interesting to see another version. That little kit of yours has a lot of detail. The paint scheme is pretty close to the one provided on the Trumpeter full color painting guide.

 

Nice job, John.

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Was the high gun placement a result of the shallow draft? Well done model, by the way.

 

Rick L.

Yes, good observation - the high section contained almost all the hoist mechanism, the shell and powder magazines were directly under the turret and main deck.
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If you could see the lower hull, you'd know right away why the turrets are that high up. If you take the distance from the waterline to the main deck, the part below the waterline isn't much more than that and then the bottom is completely flat. A turret's mechanism goes down below the deck several stories, what with machinery, shell lifts, powder and shell holding rooms, etc, etc. With no depth to the hull to hold all that, the turret had to be raised to accommodate it. The shallow draft is also the reason why the hull bulges out so much. If it didn't, the ship would not have the displacement to float, would be terribly top heavy and an unstable gun platform.

Edited by Ron Bell
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  • 1 month later...

I need to get the kit if I want to continue on with the developing of the camo masks. I got the measurements for the curvature of the hull, now I need to make a template of that bulge.

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