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Zglossip

making handmade parts

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I was wondering if anybody could tell me what to use to make sratch built parts and how to do it a video would help I am a visual leaner . thanks

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Depending on what you are looking to make, there are many modelers who post on youtube.

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How to make extra wheels, spare parts, bags and boxes rolled bags , etc

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That is resin casting! Look for it on youtube or if you really want to do it yourself.....look into CAD designing.

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Z: that's a really big topic that can incorporate any number of techniques. The short version is: WHATEVER you can make work- WORKS!

 

If (for instance) you need extras of a certain part (like the road wheels you mentioned); casting copies of the original part (usually in resin) is usually the easiest way to go. There are numerous videos on line showing how to do this, and relatively inexpensive "start-up" casting kits available from hobby shops or Micro Mark. While it's not cheap, it's not super expensive either, and the casting materials usually last for several projects (months to years) IF stored properly. This allows you to make multiple exact copies with a minimum of effort, especially if those parts have some intricate detailing.

 

If you only need to make individual parts for one model, and there is no "original" to be copied; then scratch building is called for. Again, whatever material that you can make useful to get from the idea in your head to the scale part is fair game. However, I would suggest you stock up on the following items:

 

1) sheet plastic and metal in several thicknesses: this is available in variety packs at your local hobby shop, but also look at "for sale" signs in your hardware store. Most of these are plastic, inexpensive, and can be found in varying thicknesses. Get used to looking at ANYTHING that has flat plastic attached as a potential material: ads that come in the mail and packaging for items in stores. Thin sheet metal can be had by cutting up soda cans, pot pie pans, and saving the metallic wrappings from wine bottles. Again, anything that appears useful to you is fair game. I even have a lot of old thin lead rectangles that came from a dentist (they used to be used for dental xrays).

 

2) Rod, tubing, and plastic strip: the easiest way to get these is to look at the "Plastruct" and "Evergreen" displays in your local or on-line hobby shop. The strips, rods, and tubes come in varying widths, thicknesses, and shapes and their usage is limited only by your imagination.

 

3) metal tubing and wiring: Shops sell copper and brass rod and tubing, usually found near the RC flying model section. A $5 bag of assorted "spare parts" tubing can be useful for a lifetime (I'm only halfway through the bag I bought 25yrs ago!) Also keep your eye out for spare hypo tubing, as these make great gun barrels, BUT handle those sharp points with care!. You can also find on-line sources for the hypo tubing WITHOUT the points in a variety of sizes, many of which can be fit into each other. As for wiring, any electrical device you dispose of should be taken apart and stripped of wires, insulated or not. The insulation can be cut and fit around WWI cockpits as the "coaming"! For stiff wire, a local florist can supply you with a handful for a couple of dollars, and you may find a couple of different sizes too.

 

4) Photo etch and resin parts: While you may buy a pe or resin set for a model, you can also find some "generic" sets that provide panels, handles, trim wheels, and buttons. Keep your eyes open for any set like that that appears useful to you. Also, any "used" sets may contain a part or shape that you can adapt for your use, including the frets pe parts are attached to! It pays to be a pack rat when it comes to saving used pe and resin materials!

 

5) The spare parts box: Once more, get used to saving EVERYTHING from a kit when you're done! Some parts will have obvious limits, such as spare exhaust stacks. However, other small parts may be used inside or outside, depending on what you're trying to duplicate. I have about a dozen cigar boxes that I have full of parts, divided up into such things as WWII drop tanks, modern bombs, props, figures, and clear parts (to name a few). The better your dividing, labeling, and storing these items; the faster you can track down that part you remember that you think will be useful! Also, these parts can be cut up or combined to make a new part!

 

6) Tools: get a good pair of compass dividers. Wire cutters are useful too. A good mutli-speed, rechargeable motor tool is very useful for cutting tubing and drilling holes, as well as grinding and routing out shapes and parts. A good set of small drill bits is a necessity, as well as a variety of hand saws (hobby sized). Invest in a good miniature punch and die set. This one tool will enable you to make and detail a LOT of stuff with better precision! You'll need a metal straight edge or ruler for measuring and guiding long cuts. A regular compass with a cutting point instead of a lead will allow you to cut circles, although a circle template and a knife with a new #11 blade will often suffice for this.

 

There are many books on scratch building, as well as videos on U Tube. I also suggest you go here: http://forum.largescaleplanes.com/index.php?showforum=64&prune_day=100&sort_by=Z-A&sort_key=last_post&topicfilter=all This is a page with various scratch building projects that will show you many approaches to both large and small parts, inside and out. The Hallifax and PC-7 builds are a couple of the best for this!

 

Last piece of advice: experience plays a large part in this! Just like painting with an airbrush, don't expect top results your first time out! But, don't be afraid to tackle some scratch building either. The end results can be very satisfying, just knowing you overcame an obstacle all by yourself! Hope this helps!

 

GIL :smiley16:

Edited by ghodges

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Thanks a lot for your advice I don't think I'll have money for the resin casting but the other stuff I could probably do thanks a million for the advice

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Contact a local resin caster and ask about special ordering some parts made. I have been casting for almost 15 years and that is the only way to go. Make a great looking original and cast several for saving.

 

Art

ABC Specialties

Resin Casting

 

http://public.fotki.com/Goodguyinar416/

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...get used to saving EVERYTHING from a kit when you're done!

 

GIL :smiley16:

 

Amen, fellow graduate of the School of 'Never Throw Nuthin; Away'!

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