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Verlinden "The Prisoner" completed


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I acquired this figure kit several years ago as my LHS was ending its last hours and it was still unclaimed and headed for the trash (because the box was in bad shape and a turnoff to discriminating buyers). The chain did not come with the kits; it is a Hobby Lobby craft item).

 

Prisoner1_zps7fc8e419.jpg

 

Prisoner8_zps0868f186.jpg

 

Prisoner10_zpsaa60a73c.jpg

 

Prisoner14_zps30f010ba.jpg

 

Prisoner12_zpsfc2d4ef9.jpg

 

Prisoner15_zpsa7075a99.jpg

 

I worked on this model in small steps off and on until I discovered there were no more steps and it was done.

 

This is a Rule 5 figure without the included (fortunately) breast covers.

 

Comments and questions are welcome.

 

Ed

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Very nicely done, never had the patience to do figures very well. The chains look a little too new for the setting. How big/what scale is it?

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Hey Rob, I saw this last night at our meeting and the chains don't look as new looking as in the photo. I think it is just the flash giving it a shinier look than they are. The chain looks pretty nice with everything "hanging out" as it is. They are a lot darkier looking than in the pic's. The whole vignette is really done up well.

 

Ed, again nice job.

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Nice, and not at all what I was expecting from the title!

 

Lot's a "flesh" there, and it's very well done. Could you elaborate on how you did that? Thanks, and congrats!

 

GIL :smiley16:

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Hi, Rob, Bill, and Gil,

 

Thanks for your nice comments.

 

For Rob, the scale is 150mm. The figure is 140 mm from tip to toe. The wall section including floor thickness is 7.5 inches high. Regarding the chain, I looked for something a little different than the standard uniform links. This style appealed to me, and I liked the bronze finish so much that I did not want to ruin it with weathering (rusting) materials. Who is to say that the captors did not use a new chain attached to that leather harness?

 

For Gil, I agree there is a major amount of flesh showing on this figure. So much, in fact that I had to do the skin above the waist first and let it completely dry before I could touch and hold the painted skin wearing white cotton gloves so I could then paint everything below the waist. It's like trying to paint a sphere; you can't both hold it and paint it all at one time.

 

How do I paint flesh? I prefer artist oil paints and use fine brushes down to 20/0 tips. I've tried Vallejo paints from the plastic bottles, and I just can't make them stay moist long enough to work with them in blending, and they do leave brush strokes in the paint on big areas. My choice is Windsor & Newton for flesh.

 

I start with a base coat of Floquil Gray Figure Primer shot from the rattle can over the bare resin surface of the figure and let it completely dry. The first color coat is W&N #20 Flesh Tint, which is too reddish-pink for the look of skin by itself. Spread the paint as thinly as you can onto the primer to get a smooth coating without brush marks. Again, let this dry completely (oils may take a week or more) before you touch it again. Now you are ready for the skin tone painting.

 

I use the little clear plastic lids you get with small condiment containers at a restaurant for a pallet because you do not really need a huge surface for small amounts of paint from the tubes. From the tubes I squeeze a small amount of the following colors into adjacent but separate areas: W&N #20 Flesh Tint, W&N #26 Lemon Yellow Hue, and W&N #40 Titanium White next to each other. For the shading, squeeze tiny amounts of W&N #34 Raw Sienna, W&N #2 Burnt Sienna, and W&N #3 Burnt Umber. You may need W&N #24 Ivory Black for a fine detail work, but not for the shading of skin.

 

I mix paint on the pallet with a toothpick. Scrape some of the #20 Flesh Tint, #26 Lemon Yellow Hue, and #40 Titanium White into a central spot and blend them together. You need a smaller amount of the yellow to cut the reddish pink and a more generous amount of the white to lighten it all. Your eye has to tell you when you have it close to a skin color. Now you will paint the lightened mixture over the dried #20 Flesh tint, which you wish to cover with a thin coat as far as you can make each dab of paint spread. It may look glossy because it is still wet. The shading is done right on the figure using your fine tip brush with only a minute amount of the darker colors placed into the hollows and recesses. You will literally blend the dark spots into the wet skin paint with a nearly dry brush technique. If you get too much dark paint or spread it onto areas where it is not needed, use your skin tone brush and cover it with the lighter skin color again. A nice thing about oil paint is that you can literally lift off a mistake with the tip of a #11 blade and reapply the correct paint without a "step" in the paint. Use some extra white on the skin tone to get some highlights or to bring out areas where the sun does not usually shine.

 

Facial skin is another matter because women use makeup and men do not. When your real life lady applies makeup she uses a light touch to the added colors, excluding lipstick colors from this generalization. You must paint the face of a female figure in the same way, where tiny amounts of color are spread and smoothed over cheeks and onto eyelids. Here you can use the #24 Ivory Black for eyelashes and eyeliner. Use the softer blues, grays, and pinks for eyeshadow. Eyebrows can be brown or black, but be careful to keep the paint thin and the shape of the brows correct (the #11 blade is useful here if you apply too much paint).

 

Hair color is a matter of your choice. I find blond hair more difficult than auburn or black hair simply because blond hair has so many different colors to it. Nail polish and lip color can be almost any color you choose.

 

Let everything dry completely before you touch the figure again. Some colors dry faster than others. If you get impatient and pick up what looks like a dry paint job, you can easily find that slightly moist spot, transfer it to your finger, and then spot it all over your dry paint before you notice it happening. Ask me how I know! Give it a couple of weeks. Build something else in the interim.

 

Have fun with figure painting!

 

Ed

Edited by ewahl
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  • 9 months later...

Very nice! I don't remember seeing that kit before.

I do agree about the chains looking too new. A little dark wash should fix that up. But Excellent job! :smiley32:

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Thanks for looking and your comment, Kevin,

 

The Verlinden kit is #771 in the "Fantasy Figure" series. I can only wonder what other figures were available in that series. It may be in an old catalog somewhere.

 

Ed

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