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EARLY PEEK AT UPCOMING STAR TREK VOYAGER PROJECT!


papasmurf
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:D Impressive work my friend. The stars topic is fascinating, maybe someday I will start one project, but first I will see your great work and learn in order to avoid faults :lol: hee,hee.

 

Regards,

Rodolfo

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Thank you, and it's OK to make mistakes, part of the "learning process", but it's wise to try and not repeat them! :smiley17:

 

Something I'm sure your aware of Rodolfo, considering the great quality of your work! :smiley20:

 

Keep on modeling Dude! :smiley16:

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OK, more "glassing" work, some partially refined, some just applied and still rather "rough", but I should get through this stage by end of week. We get into "more interesting areas" then. :smiley17:

 

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"HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO ME...

I'M ALMOST FIFTY......

GOT A FACE LIKE A MONKEY.....

AND THE DRINKS ARE ON ME!"

 

marx.gif

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A few "glassing clarity" test sessions, with single, CCFL Tubes, this will be augmented with various LEDS, more soon! :smiley2:

 

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Now detailing interior, of the kit-supplied Windows, with Outer Space Outfitters back lit panel kit. This adds a nice touch of realism to the Voyager's overall presentation, and some dimensional augment for the viewer. I sell the kits at www.strangestuffstudio.com , on the Product Page, if you'd like to add this detail to your Voyager project. I don't recommend it for novices however, it's a bit tricky to get it all lined up correctly, and then later, to touch up some tiny light leaks that are going to need attention.

 

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Smurfer,

 

Sensational appearance on the Voyager even in the test-fitting stage. Whenever I attempt a kit with interior lights, I can't wait until I am finally satisfied with fixing light leaks and glowing plastic so I can button the thing up. I am probably my own worst critic in this regard. Thank goodness guys like you provide continuing inspiration to strive for perfection. :smiley32:

 

Ed

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Smurfer,

 

Sensational appearance on the Voyager even in the test-fitting stage. Whenever I attempt a kit with interior lights, I can't wait until I am finally satisfied with fixing light leaks and glowing plastic so I can button the thing up. I am probably my own worst critic in this regard. Thank goodness guys like you provide continuing inspiration to strive for perfection. :smiley32:

 

Ed

 

 

Well golly!!! :smiley4: Thanks Ed! Yep, those light leaks are a major issue, ruins the illusion even if you got 99% of them fixed, tough to get them all. Takes time, and sitting in a dark room, with much patience and determination. I've started using night vision gear, to spot these, as the thermal/optical signature of even tiny leaks, are pronounced through this specialized vision gear.

 

A good application of plastic friendly primer, 2 coats of black(flat), and a final silver or aluminium coat, all over the inside of Hull, and any lighted sections, will keep the "glowing" plastic away, and keep light intensified inside, where you want it. This applies to enamels, as I rarely use acrylics, which I find less durable, and versatile, in these types of builds.

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Rather than spray all that paint, I use liquid foil glue on household aluminum foil. When the glue turns tacky, I lather the inside surfaces with the foil, not worrying about overlaps or neatness. In fact, the overlaps seal the edges from light seepage nicely. NO light gets through foil! If you then damage the foil when drilling and cutting openings through from the front of the piece, it's no big deal to go back and reseal the broken edges. In effect, you are masking the entire interior permanently. If you need to mount something structural for interior detail or superstructure for the lighting hardware, trim away the foil at the desired locations, glue whatever you are mounting in place, and run some more foil around the glue joint area.

 

Because of the lighted floor in my Flying Sub using 18 minilamps, I foiled the entire lower hull beneath the floor to keep the light from illuminating the lower hull, which it will do even through the finish paint coats. Likewise, I fully lined both hull halves of the C57-D and made certain I crumpled foil all the way around the inside of the rim to keep the hull pieces from bleeding interior light.

 

Let's use an example here: the AMT Star Wars Death Star kit. Because of the small scale of a station that's the size of "a small moon," any lighted opening is too tiny to see interior detail. The sphere is assembled from eight essentially identical sphere segments. Foil the inside of the eight segments first. Assemble and paint the two hemispheres, covering the inside of the joints with foil. Then drill a couple thousand tiny holes (use your references for locations) through the plastic and foil to insert fiber optic pegs. The pegs need only to be long enough to be flush with the exterior surface and extend slightly past the foil on the inside. If any colored lights are needed, brush a drop of colored glass stain on the inside of the pegs in question and let dry. Put the two hemispheres together. A single light source inside the assembled sphere will be sufficient to light ALL of the fiber optic pegs without the need to run bundles of long leads to the bulb. The reflective foil will distribute the light evenly, and no light will leak through or illuminate the sphere.

 

Consider this an alternative technique. :smiley14:

 

Ed

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Rather than spray all that paint, I use liquid foil glue on household aluminum foil. When the glue turns tacky, I lather the inside surfaces with the foil, not worrying about overlaps or neatness. In fact, the overlaps seal the edges from light seepage nicely. NO light gets through foil! If you then damage the foil when drilling and cutting openings through from the front of the piece, it's no big deal to go back and reseal the broken edges. In effect, you are masking the entire interior permanently. If you need to mount something structural for interior detail or superstructure for the lighting hardware, trim away the foil at the desired locations, glue whatever you are mounting in place, and run some more foil around the glue joint area.

 

Because of the lighted floor in my Flying Sub using 18 minilamps, I foiled the entire lower hull beneath the floor to keep the light from illuminating the lower hull, which it will do even through the finish paint coats. Likewise, I fully lined both hull halves of the C57-D and made certain I crumpled foil all the way around the inside of the rim to keep the hull pieces from bleeding interior light.

 

Let's use an example here: the AMT Star Wars Death Star kit. Because of the small scale of a station that's the size of "a small moon," any lighted opening is too tiny to see interior detail. The sphere is assembled from eight essentially identical sphere segments. Foil the inside of the eight segments first. Assemble and paint the two hemispheres, covering the inside of the joints with foil. Then drill a couple thousand tiny holes (use your references for locations) through the plastic and foil to insert fiber optic pegs. The pegs need only to be long enough to be flush with the exterior surface and extend slightly past the foil on the inside. If any colored lights are needed, brush a drop of colored glass stain on the inside of the pegs in question and let dry. Put the two hemispheres together. A single light source inside the assembled sphere will be sufficient to light ALL of the fiber optic pegs without the need to run bundles of long leads to the bulb. The reflective foil will distribute the light evenly, and no light will leak through or illuminate the sphere.

 

Consider this an alternative technique. :smiley14:

 

Ed

 

I've used ultra thin, self-adhering foils, on certain interior blocking segments of a few projects Ed, I find them rather labor-intensive, and prefer airbrush applications for efficiency, and complete saturation, without the possibility of "missing" a spot. Also, in the long run, anything "glued" as a surface blocker, can become "unglued", especially if high voltage CCFLS and their Inverters, which produce heat, are involved. I have found that ACLAD metallics are quite good at light-blocking, although a tad expensive.

 

Not knocking the technique, as it's quite good for blocking Laser light, which will go through most paint blocks (except thickened white), but it's not my "preferred" method. I think it boils down to what works "best" for you, and is a very "personal" choice. Costs, time, and lighting source, should be taken into account, when choosing which method will yield the desired results.

 

It's nice to point out both these potential methods, for those considering techniques, on their first few lighted attempts.

 

Oddly enough, I was eyeing a "Death Star" re-release kit, just last week, and considering building one up for the Studio, which has dozens of Ships hanging from the ceiling! :smiley17:

 

The light blocking process also continues on the exterior, after a primer coat has been applied. Wisps of flat black airbrush sprays, over "spots" or "seams", are the "last touch" before starting primary color applications, once those corrections are covered with a second primer coat.

 

There are other techniques as well, interior "compartments" or "chambers", focal housings, liquid & sprayable rubber compounds, all sorts of methods and products are available to builders these days!

 

Thanks for sharing Ed, I'm sure some members, now have a better concept, on how this can be done, and the many methods to be considered. :smiley20:

 

Good post!

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Almost ready to begin sub-assembly construction, and early lighting installation. Primary CCFL Tubes, and the Thruster circuit LEDS first. These are the light test session shots, using the most sensitive "dark mode" Lens settings, on the Studio Camera. Windows, Port Holes, and back lighted inserts completed.

 

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Some early progress on the Voyager's randomized Thrusters effect. A lot of drilling and carving involved to accurize the solid parts. A film clip is posted on the Kit Factory website, of the LED glowing through apertures on Primary Saucer.

 

These apertures will have clear inserts added, and surround the Ship, for an added lighting effect.

 

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All is still very rough, refinements begin later in the build. :smiley20:

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In this update, it's mostly film clips of the Voyager's Primary Saucer lighting effects. A couple of stills posted below, but click the link if you want to see the clips.

 

http://www.simonmercs.biz/WORKBENCH.html

 

For you dial-up people, it could take quite a while to load, sorry, big video files...... :smiley24:

 

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Presently at the Electronics Installation stage, for each Sub-assembly built so far. Warp Engines are next, some shots of the wiring harnesses being created, and step-by-step, working their way towards the Base. This a slow and careful stage, everything must work right, and all must also allow for the correct fit of the parts as well. :smiley17:

 

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As we are back online, here's a bit of progress on the Voyager. Secondary Hull now attached to Primary Hull bottom, top is placed dry fit style, to test the lighting systems before I go further. Mostly film clips in this update, so if you'd like to see the Photon's firing, and Navs and strobes, installed so far, working, please click on the link, update is at the top of the page.

 

http://www.simonmercs.biz/WORKBENCH.html

 

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Coming up next, Warp Engines, and a highly detailed, scratch-built, Shuttle Bay! :smiley20:

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

A bit more progress now finished on the Voyager. Strobes and Navs are all active on each sub-assembly. This weeks update is mostly film clips, so click on the link to see those.

 

http://www.simonmercs.biz/WORKBENCH.html

 

A few images of the project as of this week, posted below.

 

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A lot of progress on getting the lighting installed in the Aft section, and Shuttle Bay, as well as almost completing the assembly of major sections. Again, mostly film clips of the special effects on this update. Go to the link to see these posted,

 

http://www.simonmercs.biz/WORKBENCH.html

 

Here's a few stills of lighting work, and do note these are "in production" images, still very rough, and no light blocking has been applied yet.

 

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Do note that the lighted Shuttles, interior and exterior, are about 1/3 of an inch long, as the Bay is about 1.3 inches by 1.5 inches in area.

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We are presently in "Masking Hell", many apertures, very little sanity left after only a few days, but here goes. These are the final lighted images of the Voyager project, with all systems active, before I began the masking process, a few days ago. :smiley13:

 

3 film clips posted if you want to see that at http://www.simonmercs.biz/WORKBENCH.html

 

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Now it enters the "Cocoon" stage, as I prepare to paint. :smiley20:

 

 

 

 

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Gee Papa,

 

Since I am currently working my way through collecting up the DVD sets of Star Trek Voyager, this is an awesome job of work to find. While not my favorite of all the series, it was one that I saw the least of up to now.

 

So where is Neelixs' galley? ;)

 

Keep up the excellent work, I will have to check back on this one.

 

Jay Massey

treadhead1952

Las Vegas, NV

 

 

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Thanks Jay, not my favorite spin-off either, I grew up with the original series, so that will always be the best to me. However, the Intrepid-Class Starship is a very sleek design, sort of a "Mini-E", so it's quite popular with my clients.

 

I got the first primer coat applied just before Thanksgiving, an update to be posted next week.

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