Jump to content

Visual appeal or historical accuracy


Guest PetrolGator

Recommended Posts

Guest PetrolGator

This top is rather blatantly stolen from ModelWarships, but in my defense, I'm curious how non ship guys will respond. Mind you I'm aware, "visual appeal" and "historical" accuracy can often overlap. However, in the event that you have to trade one for another, which way do you swing?

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm more into accuracy. I've never really been into fiction either. As a rule I don't do whiffers. The only one I have done in recent history was actually based on a real set of aircraft so I guess it's semi-accurate. On the other hand I do take artistic license with my subjects just as we all do. Recessed panel lines, pre-shading, post-shading, color modulation. Is all that stuff accurate or artistic? I say artistic. I guess it really depends on your definition of accuracy.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't have the knowledge, reference material, nor frankly the desire for "accuracy". I build models. Most generally they look like what they are suppose to represent and that's fine with me.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Depends, but I get more satisfaction from visual appeal.

 

If I'm building for a client or a museum (which is rare), then accuracy becomes quite important, and I crack my references to be sure that I get the major points right (any that can be seen). Occasionally, I go the extra mile if I feel the need. Example: I'm currently converting an F-105D to an F-105B, and I'm going the extra mile by filling the gun vents, removing the radar display from the main instrument panel, and making a few more small changes that would stick out like a sore thumb if I didn't. The big change is the new, shorter nose. The rest is just window dressing to prevent nit-pickers from carping.

 

Outside of that, I really like a model that POPS! The "Spanish school" is interesting, if often carried a bit too far. I do like post shading and using other effects for contrast and visual appeal. You have to remember that a very important component of what we do is ART. Artists paint their subjects in 2 dimensions, and use various artistic "tricks" (highlighting, etc.) to make them more appealing to the viewer. Monochromatic subjects may be technically accurate, but they're also blase' and boring. We build and paint our subjects in 3 dimensions and the same artistic tricks can be used to make our models more visually interesting. They probably need to be used in a more restrained manner, since we have one added dimension compared to a painted canvas, but the principle is the same.

 

Accuracy is fine, where needed, but I'd rather look at an interesting looking, visually appealing model than a monochromatic accurate one.

 

GIL :smiley16:

Link to post
Share on other sites

I build what I feel like at the time I happen to be building. For instance, I like building tanks and on occasion, building a WW2 German tank. I often don't care if the tank should have zimmerit or not. If I don't feel like adding it to the surface, I won't even if I know it should have it based on the version or markings. Sometimes I will add it if it is supposed to have it. Depends on my mood, the cost and availability of the zimmerit or the ease of application, the position of the stars in the sky, etc.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Accuracy is not important to me at all..within limits. What I mean if the pilots seats cushions were a color I don't have, I'll just get close and call it good. I won't run out and buy a bottle or blend one. Close is good. That being said, I try to get colors close but in the end, fun means so much m ore than 100% accuracy. I like to build planes that either mean something to me or have neat markings.

 

When I got back in the hobby, the accuracy bug bit me and I would buy a kit and then all the aftermarkert and then 3 books and then...etc. Never built the kit. And then a new one. I got past that to just enjoy the building and the other people in the hobby

 

But to each his own

 

Dave

Link to post
Share on other sites

For some of my more detailed builds, all visible wiring is as accurate as I can get it, right down to the firing order of the ignition system.

 

I try to get a paint sample(usually a bottle of touchup paint) from the brand(Ferrari, Porsche, etc)

 

It's amazing to me how many people don't scratch an Antenna if the car had one.

 

Also amazing how may people don't get rid of ejector marks from the underside of the vehicle, or under the hood with cars.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest PetrolGator

I tend to strive for as must historical accuracy as my resources allow. With Google Image, several reference books, and a pretty good working knowledge of WWI and WWII era ships, I do pretty well at least knowing what I'm looking at.

 

Things I'm incredibly anal about:

 

- Era appropriate weaponry/radar. AA armament changed significantly over a ship's life in WWII. Several ships lost significant sections of the superstructure to make room/lost weight for increased protection from assault. The same goes for radar. I LOVE WWII layouts simply because there were so many. It was an era of experimentation.

 

- Weathering. Most ships, and especially smaller escorts and destroyers, were absolutely beat to hell before they could get a fresh coat in port. While I appreciate "museum quality" builds, I just don't like building them. A dirty ship is a good ship.

 

- Sea scapes. Perhaps it's my former oil painting day, or maybe my time spent working offshore, but I'm VERY anal about how my water looks. I'll vary the shade/colors to appropriately reflect the sea or ocean being represented.

 

 

Lukewarm to "whatever"

 

- Complex rigging. On the RARE occasion I find an accurate diagram showing how this was actually done, I'll do it. More often than not, well, it's guesswork. I add enough to make a build look "busy" but try not to take away from the rest of the ship.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I will worry about absolute accuracy when a 3" tall person walks over to one of my model cars and drives it off! Visual accuracy is important, numeric is not.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I will worry about absolute accuracy when a 3" tall person walks over to one of my model cars and drives it off! Visual accuracy is important, numeric is not.

 

It is when there's a tie, and the firing order is documented, Pete! ;)

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I will worry about absolute accuracy when a 3" tall person walks over to one of my model cars and drives it off! Visual accuracy is important, numeric is not.

 

It is when there's a tie, and the firing order is documented, Pete! ;)

 

OOPs! I forgot what web site I was on. :blush:

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest PetrolGator

 

 

I will worry about absolute accuracy when a 3" tall person walks over to one of my model cars and drives it off! Visual accuracy is important, numeric is not.

 

It is when there's a tie, and the firing order is documented, Pete! ;)

 

OOPs! I forgot what web site I was on. :blush:

 

 

 

OK, so serious moment.

 

I built a 1/700 IJN Nagato with all the bells and whistles. I had one guy confront me and tell me that in 1944, she was painted a slightly different shade of grey, with the paint chips pulled up on his phone.

 

Mind you, I'm NOT a small guy. I was downright stunned that this dude would come up and NITPICK to me, in my face, on something that, frankly, would be unnoticeable to 99% of the population. Still, seeing as the judges were standing near by, I was pretty pissed.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

I will worry about absolute accuracy when a 3" tall person walks over to one of my model cars and drives it off! Visual accuracy is important, numeric is not.

 

It is when there's a tie, and the firing order is documented, Pete! ;)

 

OOPs! I forgot what web site I was on. :blush:

 

 

 

OK, so serious moment.

 

I built a 1/700 IJN Nagato with all the bells and whistles. I had one guy confront me and tell me that in 1944, she was painted a slightly different shade of grey, with the paint chips pulled up on his phone.

 

Mind you, I'm NOT a small guy. I was downright stunned that this dude would come up and NITPICK to me, in my face, on something that, frankly, would be unnoticeable to 99% of the population. Still, seeing as the judges were standing near by, I was pretty pissed.

 

 

I've had that done also. I will never understand the person who will time something like that for the maximum impact, trying to scuttle you chances. Not that I care all that much about trophies, but such self serving attacks are absolutely uncalled for.

Link to post
Share on other sites

A long time ago when I didn't know better and there were fewer paint colors, I had an MG on the turret of a tank painted a bright metallic color (not silver, just bright). An "expert" told me he never saw a silver machine gun. I responded with "Well, now you have." He gave me a quizzical look and wandered away to pick other nits somewhere.

Edited by Ron Bell
Link to post
Share on other sites

A long time ago when I didn't know better and there were fewer paint colors, I had an MG on the turret of a tank painted a bright metallic color (not silver, just bright). An "expert" told me he never saw a silver machine gun. I responded with "Well, now you have." He gave me a quizzical look and wandered away to pick other nits somewhere.

 

LOL!! Good One Ron, I'll have to remember that one. :Smile_sceptic:

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

I will worry about absolute accuracy when a 3" tall person walks over to one of my model cars and drives it off! Visual accuracy is important, numeric is not.

 

It is when there's a tie, and the firing order is documented, Pete! ;)

 

OOPs! I forgot what web site I was on. :blush:

 

 

 

OK, so serious moment.

 

I built a 1/700 IJN Nagato with all the bells and whistles. I had one guy confront me and tell me that in 1944, she was painted a slightly different shade of grey, with the paint chips pulled up on his phone.

 

Mind you, I'm NOT a small guy. I was downright stunned that this dude would come up and NITPICK to me, in my face, on something that, frankly, would be unnoticeable to 99% of the population. Still, seeing as the judges were standing near by, I was pretty pissed.

 

 

Wow, I'm sorry someone did that to you. That just ain't right. I would have probably replied with something along the lines of, "Well, we know that colors on a monitor or screen are not always accurately rendered so I'm not so sure yours are as accurate as you say they are."

 

I just like to build my models. If I can make them look accurate with a touch of artistry, then I will, but I won't chop up a kit or buy a ton of aftermarket stuff just to make it look accurate. If it looks like a duck then it is a duck.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, like Mark said color chips on a screen are totally bogus as a reference unless that screen has been calibrated. We used to calibrate our screens when I worked in a lab but I have never seen anybody calibrate a phone or tablet. :smiley29:

 

And just exactly when does color tone and shade come into the equation as far as judging goes? This is right out of the handbook...

 

  • Paint colors can vary due to variations from paint batch to batch, different operating environments can change colors in different ways, paints fade from the effects of weather and sunlight, and viewing distance can change the look of virtually any color. Poor initial application and subsequent maintenance compound these problems. Therefore, color shade should not be used to determine a model's accuracy. Models with unusual colors or color schemes should have appropriate documentation.

 

In the end Dork's are people too. :smiley2:

Link to post
Share on other sites

I am a switch hitter--going for accuracy on my detailed conversion and scratchbuilt models (and sci-fi from movies) and for visual impact when doing something like an airliner in a stunning color scheme. Who is to say one mode is preferable to the other? I will admit, however, that usually a model that does not have some visual appeal to me on a table does not get the second look for the accuracy part (unless I am judging).

 

By the way, I will hear (hard to avoid) but not listen to the color police and rivet counters who always "know" more about the subject of your model than you do. I like to ask those people to show me THEIR correctly built same model.

 

Ed

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest PetrolGator

Whatever happened to artistic license?

 

 

The government taxed it. ;)

 

In all seriousness, agree. I like making my ships more "accurate" simply because I like the busy look of a realistic deck.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I primarily build military subjects and usually try to give the build "visual accuracy". By that I mean correct markings, correct features, and an appropriate paint scheme. That being said, I am not anal about "dimentional accuracy". If some parts are slightly out of scale, but don't detract from the build visually - or enhance the visual appearance - then I let them slide.

Link to post
Share on other sites
×
×
  • Create New...