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I have been working on an amt 1970 Dodge superbee.and during a move from our old home to our new home the hood for it has come up missing. I was wondering if someone would know where I could get another without buying a whole other kit. post-2416-0-38341800-1377725616_thumb.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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You can try the supplier...sometimes they'll bail out a modeler with a missing part.

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this might help........

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Chrysler-1970-Dodge-Coronet-Super-Bee-Hood-AMT-1-25-/360652835852?pt=Model_Kit_US&hash=item53f8958c0c#ht_561wt_1178

 

It appears to be a solid hood. Just not sure of a difference between a Coronet Superbee and a Superbee.

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Mark: In 1968, the Dodge Division of Chrysler Corporation offered two models for sale: a basic Dodge Coronet sedan with the base 225 cubic inch "slant" six cylinder engine, including optional engine packages up to the famous 426 cubic inch, 425 horsepower "Hemi" V-8 engine, which made it a "Super Bee". A Super Bee is based on the Coronet body, which is essentially one in the same car. Probably the most popular Super Bee introduced in early 1969, was the famous 440 cubic inch, 390 horsepower V-8 with the optional "Six Pack" carburation, now worth around $130,000!! The "B" series body was a production code used by the manufacturer to identify the basic body shape. General Motors used a similar identification code when applied to it's "A" bodies, i.e., Chevrolet Chevelle, Buick Skylark/Gran Sport, Pontiac GTO, Oldsmobile Cutlass/442 series etc. I know. I used to work on some of them when I was in high school during the 1960s. I hope this clears up any confusion you may have had in identifying these cars. All the best,

 

 

Mark Fiedler (aAzZ09)

this might help........

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Chrysler-1970-Dodge-Coronet-Super-Bee-Hood-AMT-1-25-/360652835852?pt=Model_Kit_US&hash=item53f8958c0c#ht_561wt_1178

 

It appears to be a solid hood. Just not sure of a difference between a Coronet Superbee and a Superbee.

Edited by aAzZ09
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Mark: In 1968, the Dodge Division of Chrysler Corporation offered two models for sale: a basic Dodge Coronet sedan with the base 225 cubic inch "slant" six cylinder engine, including optional engine packages up to the famous 426 cubic inch, 425 horsepower "Hemi" V-8 engine, which made it a "Super Bee".

 

It was more complicated than this... The SuperBee was meant to be the low-cost, sporty-version of the Coronet family sedan in the same way as the Plymouth Roadrunner was for the sister brand's mid-size Satellite. Since Dodge was meant to be more upmarket than Plymouth, compared to the Roadrunner the SuperBee had a bit more chrome on the outside and faux wood on the inside, Both cars were available with the "little" 383 4-barrel engine as well as the Hemi; the Roadrunner could also be had with the big 440 V8.

 

Both Dodge and Plymouth also had more expensive muscle cars based on the Coronet and Satellite: these were the Coronet R/T and the Plymouth GTX (the R/T was available with the 440).

 

And then to really confuse things, many of the big motors (including the Hemi) were also available as options in the base Coronet and Satellite.

 

The ebay part looks like a stock Coronet hood - it has none of the vents/scoops that were available on the SuperBee - maybe this is the part you would cut-out to build the blower version?

 

Best way to find a replacement part: go to a model-car show, there are often vendors there selling old builtups for cheap and hopefully they have one. Or try one of the other model car forums online (try http://cs.scaleautomag.com or http://www.modelcarsmag.com/forums for starts) and see if anyone has one in their spare parts box.

 

Don

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Don: that overview was meant to be a basic look at the Coronet and it's variants. I know very well that it was more complicated than my simple explanation. I'm well aware of all the other Chrysler products offering the similar variety of V-8 engines and options. I was trying to help Mark Aldrich with a fairly simple answer to his question. I just happen to have been involved in the musclecar era and worked on cars like that during the 1960s and also sharpened my tuning skills by attending seminars given by such luminaries such as Sox and Martin and Dick Landy there at Preston Road Chrysler-Plymouth and Boedecker-Verner Dodge there in Dallas, Texas back in 1966 through 1970. I spent many an hour pulling heads, grinding valves, adjusting solid lifters, degreeing cams, and adjusting Carter, Holley, Autolite, and Rochester four barrel carbs. Some of my old friends happen to be executives with the Original Parts Group and Mopar, so I know the drill, believe me. Best,

 

Mark

 

 

Mark: In 1968, the Dodge Division of Chrysler Corporation offered two models for sale: a basic Dodge Coronet sedan with the base 225 cubic inch "slant" six cylinder engine, including optional engine packages up to the famous 426 cubic inch, 425 horsepower "Hemi" V-8 engine, which made it a "Super Bee".

 

It was more complicated than this... The SuperBee was meant to be the low-cost, sporty-version of the Coronet family sedan in the same way as the Plymouth Roadrunner was for the sister brand's mid-size Satellite. Since Dodge was meant to be more upmarket than Plymouth, compared to the Roadrunner the SuperBee had a bit more chrome on the outside and faux wood on the inside, Both cars were available with the "little" 383 4-barrel engine as well as the Hemi; the Roadrunner could also be had with the big 440 V8.

 

Both Dodge and Plymouth also had more expensive muscle cars based on the Coronet and Satellite: these were the Coronet R/T and the Plymouth GTX (the R/T was available with the 440).

 

And then to really confuse things, many of the big motors (including the Hemi) were also available as options in the base Coronet and Satellite.

 

The ebay part looks like a stock Coronet hood - it has none of the vents/scoops that were available on the SuperBee - maybe this is the part you would cut-out to build the blower version?

 

Best way to find a replacement part: go to a model-car show, there are often vendors there selling old builtups for cheap and hopefully they have one. Or try one of the other model car forums online (try http://cs.scaleautomag.com or http://www.modelcarsmag.com/forums for starts) and see if anyone has one in their spare parts box.

 

Don

 

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Don: that overview was meant to be a basic look at the Coronet and it's variants. I know very well that it was more complicated than my simple explanation. I'm well aware of all the other Chrysler products offering the similar variety of V-8 engines and options. I was trying to help Mark Aldrich with a fairly simple answer to his question. I just happen to have been involved in the musclecar era and worked on cars like that during the 1960s and also sharpened my tuning skills by attending seminars given by such luminaries such as Sox and Martin and Dick Landy there at Preston Road Chrysler-Plymouth and Boedecker-Verner Dodge there in Dallas, Texas back in 1966 through 1970. I spent many an hour pulling heads, grinding valves, adjusting solid lifters, degreeing cams, and adjusting Carter, Holley, Autolite, and Rochester four barrel carbs. Some of my old friends happen to be executives with the Original Parts Group and Mopar, so I know the drill, believe me. Best,

 

Mark

 

 

Mark: In 1968, the Dodge Division of Chrysler Corporation offered two models for sale: a basic Dodge Coronet sedan with the base 225 cubic inch "slant" six cylinder engine, including optional engine packages up to the famous 426 cubic inch, 425 horsepower "Hemi" V-8 engine, which made it a "Super Bee".

 

It was more complicated than this... The SuperBee was meant to be the low-cost, sporty-version of the Coronet family sedan in the same way as the Plymouth Roadrunner was for the sister brand's mid-size Satellite. Since Dodge was meant to be more upmarket than Plymouth, compared to the Roadrunner the SuperBee had a bit more chrome on the outside and faux wood on the inside, Both cars were available with the "little" 383 4-barrel engine as well as the Hemi; the Roadrunner could also be had with the big 440 V8.

 

Both Dodge and Plymouth also had more expensive muscle cars based on the Coronet and Satellite: these were the Coronet R/T and the Plymouth GTX (the R/T was available with the 440).

 

And then to really confuse things, many of the big motors (including the Hemi) were also available as options in the base Coronet and Satellite.

 

The ebay part looks like a stock Coronet hood - it has none of the vents/scoops that were available on the SuperBee - maybe this is the part you would cut-out to build the blower version?

 

Best way to find a replacement part: go to a model-car show, there are often vendors there selling old builtups for cheap and hopefully they have one. Or try one of the other model car forums online (try http://cs.scaleautomag.com or http://www.modelcarsmag.com/forums for starts) and see if anyone has one in their spare parts box.

 

Don

 

 

Hi Mark,

 

Didn't mean to step on your toes - just the usual IPMS obsession with trivia.

 

I was one of the teenagers in the mid 70s who bought used muscle cars when no one else wanted them and they were all we could afford. Remember - gas was a ridiculous $1 a gallon! - normal people were paying top dollar for slant 6 Dodge Darts! I had a 383 RoadRunner - I paid $500 saved up from my paper route. My high-school friends had a 350 Cutlass Ralley, 350 Chevelle, a Mustang Mach 1, and those were just my friends; the school parking lot looked like a scene from American Graffiti. We patched the rust as best we could, tried to figure out how to make them go faster and drove 'em like something out of a Burt Reynolds movie. My dad was a career mechanic and a bit of a gear-head himself; there was no sneaking a cam or headers past him - at least not while I was on his insurance policy. The collectors should thank us, because if we hadn't beat them into the ground back then they wouldn't be so rare and expensive today!

 

I graduated college in '82 and needed reliable transportation; I sold the RoadRunner for the same $500 I paid for it and was happy to add it to the down payment for a new 5.0 Mustang. After raising a family for the last 25 years I finally scratched the itch for an old car in the garage - I ended up buying a '74 260Z because I couldn't afford any of those big V8 cars we were driving back in '77!

 

Don

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No problem Don. I couldn't afford to use the musclecar to work for obvious reasons during the '70s, so, like a lot of folks, I had to get a cheaper ride. I wish we had them now. Even though I don't build model cars per se I do admire cars of the past. Happy modeling,

 

Mark

 

 

Don: that overview was meant to be a basic look at the Coronet and it's variants. I know very well that it was more complicated than my simple explanation. I'm well aware of all the other Chrysler products offering the similar variety of V-8 engines and options. I was trying to help Mark Aldrich with a fairly simple answer to his question. I just happen to have been involved in the musclecar era and worked on cars like that during the 1960s and also sharpened my tuning skills by attending seminars given by such luminaries such as Sox and Martin and Dick Landy there at Preston Road Chrysler-Plymouth and Boedecker-Verner Dodge there in Dallas, Texas back in 1966 through 1970. I spent many an hour pulling heads, grinding valves, adjusting solid lifters, degreeing cams, and adjusting Carter, Holley, Autolite, and Rochester four barrel carbs. Some of my old friends happen to be executives with the Original Parts Group and Mopar, so I know the drill, believe me. Best,

 

Mark

 

 

Mark: In 1968, the Dodge Division of Chrysler Corporation offered two models for sale: a basic Dodge Coronet sedan with the base 225 cubic inch "slant" six cylinder engine, including optional engine packages up to the famous 426 cubic inch, 425 horsepower "Hemi" V-8 engine, which made it a "Super Bee".

 

It was more complicated than this... The SuperBee was meant to be the low-cost, sporty-version of the Coronet family sedan in the same way as the Plymouth Roadrunner was for the sister brand's mid-size Satellite. Since Dodge was meant to be more upmarket than Plymouth, compared to the Roadrunner the SuperBee had a bit more chrome on the outside and faux wood on the inside, Both cars were available with the "little" 383 4-barrel engine as well as the Hemi; the Roadrunner could also be had with the big 440 V8.

 

Both Dodge and Plymouth also had more expensive muscle cars based on the Coronet and Satellite: these were the Coronet R/T and the Plymouth GTX (the R/T was available with the 440).

 

And then to really confuse things, many of the big motors (including the Hemi) were also available as options in the base Coronet and Satellite.

 

The ebay part looks like a stock Coronet hood - it has none of the vents/scoops that were available on the SuperBee - maybe this is the part you would cut-out to build the blower version?

 

Best way to find a replacement part: go to a model-car show, there are often vendors there selling old builtups for cheap and hopefully they have one. Or try one of the other model car forums online (try http://cs.scaleautomag.com or http://www.modelcarsmag.com/forums for starts) and see if anyone has one in their spare parts box.

 

Don

 

 

Hi Mark,

 

Didn't mean to step on your toes - just the usual IPMS obsession with trivia.

 

I was one of the teenagers in the mid 70s who bought used muscle cars when no one else wanted them and they were all we could afford. Remember - gas was a ridiculous $1 a gallon! - normal people were paying top dollar for slant 6 Dodge Darts! I had a 383 RoadRunner - I paid $500 saved up from my paper route. My high-school friends had a 350 Cutlass Ralley, 350 Chevelle, a Mustang Mach 1, and those were just my friends; the school parking lot looked like a scene from American Graffiti. We patched the rust as best we could, tried to figure out how to make them go faster and drove 'em like something out of a Burt Reynolds movie. My dad was a career mechanic and a bit of a gear-head himself; there was no sneaking a cam or headers past him - at least not while I was on his insurance policy. The collectors should thank us, because if we hadn't beat them into the ground back then they wouldn't be so rare and expensive today!

 

I graduated college in '82 and needed reliable transportation; I sold the RoadRunner for the same $500 I paid for it and was happy to add it to the down payment for a new 5.0 Mustang. After raising a family for the last 25 years I finally scratched the itch for an old car in the garage - I ended up buying a '74 260Z because I couldn't afford any of those big V8 cars we were driving back in '77!

 

Don

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Chris I have slowly started working on it. As far as an airbrush, I know I need one but other things have had to come first. Arthur thank you very much for the offer. I believe that I'm keeping this stock and I did find the original hood.

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