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Showing content with the highest reputation since 04/02/2019 in Posts

  1. 4 points
    My model is the Italeri 1/72 scale Fiat CR-32 Chirri." It represents an aircraft assigned to XXIII Grupo Caccia, Aviazione Legionaria. The unit was led by Lieutenant Colonel Andrea Zotti and based at Puig Moreno, Spain, June-July 1938. The unit formed part of the Italian contingent fighting for the Nationalist cause during the Spanish Civil War. I used the Osprey Fiat CR-32 Aces of the Spanish Civil War (Aircraft of the Aces 94) for inspiration; profile 28. I wanted to model Zotti's aircraft; he flew "3-4", but I only had the decals for "3-6". The model was built out-of-the-box except for the rigging. Took me 3-months to figure out I can't paint Italian camouflage with an airbrush freehand and another 3-months and a lot of Tamiya tape to manage that effort. I enjoyed the build; never worked harder to complete a model...
  2. 3 points
    This is the Platz 1:72 kit with Eduard photoetched interior panels, modified control columns, and True Details seats. I added wiring the seats, scratch-built the canopy piston housing and the canvas cover over the rear panel from CA-impregnated tissue paper, and cut the kit canopy. The wheel wells were detailed and the airbrakes were re-built and their bays were detailed. Anti-torque scissors were stolen from an F-80 photo etched sheet. The decals were sourced from 14 different sheets from Iliad, SuperScale, Fox One, AeroMaster, an Italeri B-66, and even a MicroScale railroad sheet. Weathering was limited to a wash and some scuffing on the non-skid panels. I finished it just in time for a club contest - but, since only four or five people finished their T-33s, the contest was moved to March!
  3. 3 points
    Model built for a Local Boy Scout Troop to Honor a local pilots service. P-38J from 394th FS of the 367 FG. Pilot perished in the channel on July 20 1944. Pilot was 1st Lt William L Mushrush from Steubenville OH Minecraft 1/48th P-38J with True Details interior, Eduard tires and Karaya gun barrels.The Aftermarket stuff way surpassed the Minicraft kit. Uschi Lines for antenna into a filament spring( Which you really can't see🙃) Alclad Polished Aluminum over Gloss Black Thanks for Looking Regards Bill D.
  4. 3 points
    Let me re-make a point here. Where is it written that a person MUST care if they win or lose at the contest? I know several people who attend, put the model on the table, and enjoy the rest of the convention without another thought about the contest. They enjoy looking at a roomful of models without it impacting their self-worth. Winning an award is gravy.
  5. 2 points
    From Faller, N-scale (1/160);
  6. 2 points
    Mark, so far nothing is proven about this virus. Although other forms of Corona virus do become less virulent in warmer months, that has not been proven with this particular strain. Witness the fact that as of yesterday Australia has reported 130 cases. Right now they are in the heart of a very hot summer. There is no hard evidence that this will go way as things warm up. It is a wait and see thing and not something you can plan on. I do agree that it is way too early to cancel now, but not too early to have a backup plan.
  7. 2 points
    Another step on my journey down the road of the old Aurora WW I kits. This is their DH-4. It comes with the four bladed prop instead of two and with the dual rear Lewis guns. That gun mount was disliked by the gunners as being bulky, hard to bring to bear and used up a LOT of ammunition. I added my usual basic interior, but the rest is OOTB.
  8. 2 points
    This week’s update on the PZL-23B covers the fuselage and wing details. I assembled the wings and then added the photo etch details like the entry steps and hand holds, wing joint covers, and aiming scales to the nose. The engine was then mounted. I needed to paint the base coat on the fuselage prior to mounting the exhaust as it runs along the fuselage. The underside was painted using light blue and the top was painted olive drab. The two color reference photos depicted a panel pattern on the wings. I duplicated this by adding a little green drab to the paint and painted the alternating panels on the wing tops. The main landing gear shrouds house landing lights. The kit provided the clear covers for them but no details behind them. It was just an open hole. I used a clear sprue from my scrap bin that was fit into the hole. I trimmed it flush then drilled into it with a drill bit to make the reflector. Then a smaller drill bit to make the bulb area and finally a tiny one to simulate the filament of the bulb. Stay tuned as next week as I apply the decals and final paint to finish this unique Polish aircraft. You can see all the details and photos from the start in my build log at https://davidsscalemodels.com/build-log/1-48-pzl-23b-karas/
  9. 2 points
    Finally the last of my Christmas presents came in. This is several sets of 1/72 scale resin tracks for a few different tanks. I got these to replace the tracks on several of my older models that lost them for whatever reason. I also got the AMX-30 tracks to replace the horrible ones on my French AMX-30 from Heller: That's it until my birthday....
  10. 2 points
    If we didn't try new things, judging would still be 6 AM Saturday morning with the venue closed all morning instead of someone saying "Hey why don't we judge Friday nights?". One of the best ideas ever. If you are not changing, you are dying a slow death. Sure, some things don't work but many do. Some great ideas. Dave
  11. 2 points
    I agree....nostalgia builds are fun, and you can even limit what you do to them to make them a bit more "authentic" to their past. Look at some of the builds Ron Bell has posted here for very good examples. Here's my rebuild of the old 1/48 Aurora Me-109....which I built a few years ago to commemorate (and duplicate) my very first model build...minus the gluey fingerprints! GIL
  12. 2 points
    I heard "if it ain't broke don't fix it" from my Dad starting about age 12. He was a mechanic and that was his frame of mind: cars either worked or were broke, and if they were broke you put them back the way the manufacturer built them. He sent me off to engineering school, where we learned that the people who designed things were constantly innovating and making tradeoffs trying to make things work better, because their competitors were doing the same thing. It's not obvious to me that everyone who didn't win would leave on Saturday morning. Many attendees would have already made travel plans, bought banquet tickets, raffle tickets, tour tickets, have non-refundable hotel reservations, be waiting for the vendor clearance-sale, or want to take one more circuit through the contest room. A modeler with vendor-money left in their wallet isn't about to leave. As long as there is stuff to do on Saturday afternoon there is no real reason to pack up early. There would be a tendency for non-winners to start packing up around 3-4:00 PM Saturday afternoon to beat the rush, but you could minimize that by having some "big event" about that time: a big name seminar or a pre-awards happy hour that was already included in the price of registration, so that people would want to stay for what they had already paid for. I'll be the first to admit trying this would be an experiment; we wouldn't know if it would work or not. That is the nature of innovation: you study it as well as you can and make contingency plans, but in the end you don't know if it works until you flip the switch and see what happens.
  13. 2 points
    Work continues on the PZL-23B. This week the cockpit and interior are together. The kit comes with a few resin parts like parachutes and radio equipment. Putting the walls and cockpit tub into the fuselage was a little tedious keeping the sections aligned but everything fit well. I added some 32 awg wire for cables and wires to the equipment. One thing to note is the rear gun. I had built up the rear gunner seat with the gun but once it was installed in the fuselage it was difficult working on the kit because of how delicate the assembly was. I would recommend leaving the actual gun off until near the end. With the interior completed I am now working on the lower gondola and the landing gear. You can see all the photos and details from the start in my build log at https://davidsscalemodels.com/build-log/1-48-pzl-23b-karas/
  14. 2 points
    After standing in the lobby in Chattanooga for over an hour waiting for my chance to get the early white box release, I figured I better go ahead and build the dang thing! This was an OOTB build, except for adding some Eduard seat belts. The markings are all from the spares box, except for "Pudgy". I drew those letters on yellow decal sheet and then cut each out individually. Not perfect, but close enough for Gil World! The red and white markings were all painted. The markings are for McGuire's P-38F that's depicted on the cover of the "P-38 in Action" book. All in all this kit is da bomb! The main landing gear doors are engineered so that they simply slide into place, no glue needed! Same for the drop tanks when added to their pylons! If you want to build an early Lightning, I highly recommend you give this one a try! Questions, comments, and critiques welcome, as always! Gil
  15. 2 points
    Here's a trip down memory lane for you modelers "of a certain age". This kit was first released in 1958 and It was state of the art at the time. It has decent engraved panel lines, was light on the rivets (but I sanded them off anyway), and had the embossed decal locators, which had to be removed. I replaced the gear doors as the kit ones were just too thick and the decals are cobbled together from my spares as the ones in the kit were much too yellowed to use. The finish is Alclad over some panels primed in flat and the rest in gloss black. It I could have produced this model and taken it to a contest in 1959, I might have won something, but today, it's just a nostalgia piece, but it was fun to build.
  16. 2 points
    Here is another 2020 completed build. This build started life as a Jimmy Flintstone resin body and interior and morphed into what you see here by utilizing a lot of scratchbuilding and kitbashing. I used more different materials on this from brass, resin, styrene sheet, old necklaces for chain, Bic pens for exhaust stacks and a little bit of 3D printed parts.
  17. 2 points
    Happy New Year! This will be my first build of 2020. It is the Hasegawa 1/48 AH-64D Apache Longbow Attack Helicopter. I will be adding details from the Eduard photo etch cockpit detail set, the Master Model chain gun detail set and using the decals from the IPMS 2010 National Convention. This set covers the AH-64D Apaches from the 1-285 Aviation Battalion of the Arizona Army National Guard. The specific aircraft will from Charlie Company Lobos. Starting with the cockpit, The Eduard set comes with placards for the display screens for the dash. These were cut out and trimmed to fit. A few photo etch accessories were added to complete the dashes. The control pedals and seats were then added to the cockpit tub. The cockpit tub was then installed into the fuselage along with the engine and base of the rotor assembly. You can follow the build in my build log at https://davidsscalemodels.com/build-log/1-48-apache-longbow/
  18. 2 points
    Folks, a couple of comments have been deleted from this thread because their content was more socio-political and less modeling in nature. The comments would have been better suited for "The Bullpen". Follow the forum rules, and model-on.
  19. 2 points
    This weeks’ update on the AH-64D Apache Longbow covers the assembly and details of the fuselage. The landing gear was built and detailed with photo etch. The fuselage had some vents cut out and replaced with photo etch parts. I drilled a hole thru the vent then cut out with a hobby knife and finally shaped with a small file to fit the photo etch piece. The engine exhaust was then assembled and detailed with photo etch. Once assembled the fuselage was base coat painted with the black green color. Have a few more details to add to the fuselage then on to the rotors and chain gun. You can follow the build in my build log at https://davidsscalemodels.com/build-log/1-48-apache-longbow/
  20. 2 points
    my first movie crush, the 13 yr old me wanted some princess.
  21. 2 points
    Here is the Kiowa Warrior from MRC. Great build. Very wordy directions, but comprehensive. I also used the Zactomodels exterior details. I added some seat belts, a CAR-15 on the IP.
  22. 2 points
    Here are some more photos of the build. The model was pretty easy to paint; overall MM Acryl Army Helo Green (FS 34031) on the outside and on the inside I used Tamiya NATO Black. Other shades were also used to break up the overall colors. The inside of the engine area was MM Yellow Zinc Chromate with a mist coat of fluorescent green from the square bottle in the transmission area. Adding the Zactomodels exterior set really helped the kit also. So, here they are... I used Lite Bright pegs for the screens on the IP. I wired up the Disco Ball and the tail area. On the rotor, I placed dots of red, blue, green and yellow with a toothpick for the maintenance indicators. I also made umbilicals from the fuselage to the weapon stations. After everything was together I gave it a dry brushing with Tamiya weathering powders.
  23. 2 points
    Dang Nick....learn the difference between a VALID question and a complaint.....All of us know how well our volunteers do. Gil
  24. 2 points
    I thought long before writing what I am about to write, but finally decided that I would do so even if I take flak for it, or risk crossing a line. I do not understand why this question was started here on the IPMS/USA website, or what it has to do with GENERAL MODELLING, All About Building Models. How does asking this question relate to building models? We are not supposed to bring politics into discussions on this site, but that is where this thread appears to be headed where people state their personal biases on what they do, or do not build and then make comparisons to current politics as justification. I do not believe that anyone has deliberately tried to be insulting, but I have read comments that I believe are biased and if I were thinned skinned could cause insult, and for that, and the above reason, I do not think that these types of discussions belong here on a modelling site such as this one. I feel that this discussion should be shut down before it goes any further, if for no other reason that it has nothing to do with modelling. Thanks for reading, John
  25. 2 points
    1/48 Accurate Miniatures Wright Patterson AFB P-51 NA prototype 1/48 Ta 1831/48 prewar Tamiya Zeke
  26. 2 points
    After a nearly 2 1/2 year hiatus from scale modeling, I chose this project to blow the dust off of my creativity. All told, I spent about a month from start to completion. This model depicts a Bf 109G-6 of 7./JG3 -White 10 + Black I, Bad Worishofen, 1944. The venerable Hasegawa kit speaks for itself, and there is no issues with assembly. In fact, there was no filler needed anywhere on the airframe. The only aftermarket I added was an Eduard PE seat harness. Chrome Bare Metal Foil was wrapped around the hydraulic oleo struts. The markings were from an 18 year-old Cutting Edge (Meteor Productions) sheet. Back in the day, Cutting Edge decals were my go-to for aftermarket markings. This sheet, however, gave me fits. The spiralschnauze would not lay down, so I substituted it with one from an old Eagle Strike sheet. After, of course, sanding the spinner clean and repainting/glossing. The meteors fractured in several spots, necessitating touch-ups with white paint. But, the strangest thing was the fuselage Balkenkreuze-both sides, after being set with Mr. Mark Softer, and clear coated, weathered, and semi-gloss coated-lifted from the plastic and bubbled up! Granted, the Mr. Mark Softer was maybe 6 or 7 years old, and there was not much left in the bottle, so that may have played a factor. So, I stripped the fuselage of those two decals, cleaned up the areas, re-painted the areas, re-glossed the areas, and used the kit’s markings. These performed well. The antennae wire is stretched sprue. Having not completed (or really worked on anything for that matter) for nearly three years made this project a humbling experience. There’s a lot of room for improvement, and I have a lot of work to do in the future. Thanks for looking…
  27. 2 points
    I agree, but at the same time realize these are things often hard to judge without first hand knowledge. Every operational vehicle I have been on or in is covered with foot prints. Still, many build their models as a case of immaculate perception. But it isn't fair for someone to do things correctly, but lose to a model with a lot of inaccurate, but aesthetically appealing details. I would love to see someone do a piece for the Journal on the basic dos and don'ts of modern armor stowage. It wouldn't have to be an in depth thing, just a photos and such showing authentic things. The more people know will make them better builders and judges. Dak
  28. 2 points
    This build is the Tamiya 1/48 scale P-47D Thunderbolt “Bubbletop”. It will be detailed with Eduard’s Big Edition photo etch set. For this scheme I will be using the brand new set of decals from Thunder Cals. This is their latest set featuring P-47D’s from the European Theater. I will be doing the “Ozark Queen” of the 84th FS/78th FG from the 8th Air Force. It was flown by Captain Alfred F. Eaton in the summer of 1944. You can check out the details of their new set on their website at https://thundercals.com/48006-78th-fg-365th-fg-bubbletop-and-razorback-tbolts-new-decal-announcement/ As typical with aircraft builds, it all starts with the cockpit. While the Tamiya cockpit is highly detailed out of the box, Eduard does add some placards and fine details that further enhance the cockpit. Once the cockpit was built up I started preparing the fuselage to install the cockpit. Eduard does provide an interesting add on. Typically the intercooler on 1/48 scale P-47’s has an opening that just goes into the fuselage and is typically open. Eduard actually includes all the duct work to the intercooler. It is difficult to photograph but I was able to just get a good angle to show it. If you want to see more photos and follow along check out my build log at https://davidsscalemodels.com/build-log/1-48-p-47d-thunderbolt-bubbletop/
  29. 2 points
    I've had this one done for a while and just got around to rigging it. Usual out of the box with a minimum interior added. The decals were way gone and I didn't want to spend stupid money for new ones, so these are spurious markings I cobbled together and a paint scheme that is an amalgam of several I have seen. The rockets were used to shoot at zeppelins and observation balloons, but most sources cannot site where one was actually shot down with them.
  30. 2 points
    Since when did abdominal laparotomy sponges become a household item? 😳 Does the Health Department know about this? 😀 Nick Filippone
  31. 2 points
    Nick, I am not the only moderator here. I can't read/moderate everything, on every forum, so I must rely on my fellow moderators to help out. Sorry if you're feeling I'm picking on you. I promise you I'm not. I can only answer for what I see. And yes, I have made mistakes or just missed things in the past and unfortunately will do so again. For that leniency I apologize, but not for enforcing the rules. I have chosen in the past, to give everyone a little leniency with the rules for the sake of debate, but apparently you are calling me on the carpet for that. So, in the future I will call it when I see it. I'm not looking for respect or anything else here. I'm just doing my job as best I can. All I ask from everyone, is common courtesy so we can all enjoy your and Dave's comments and lively debates.
  32. 2 points
    As a diorama judge for many years, my first question when I look at a diorama is "What story is it trying to tell me?" Those that make it very obvious, very quickly will have a greater chance of making it to the Final Three for that category. Another criteria is the consistency between items on the diorama. For example, if showing a desert scene, and 5 vehicles have matte finishes, but the 6th is glossy, I go read the entry sheet to see if the builder discusses why he/she did it this way. If there's no explanation, that inconsistency will make further progress more difficult during the rest of the judging session. The use of space is considered, but not as heavily as these two criteria. I hope these comments help you!
  33. 2 points
    OK, its not a real TNH, but the Tamiya 1/48 Panzer 38(T). The tank was developed in Czechoslovakia just before the war started. As a matter of fact, it wasn't even in service yet when the conflict began, so this example is rather spurious in its markings. The Germans thought so much of the vehicle they modified them slightly and equipped whole armored divisions with them (Rommels 7th in France for one) right up to the Russian campaign. The 37mm gun was as good or better as that mounted on any German tank at the time (with the possible exception or the Mk IV, but that 75mm was a short barreled infantry support weapon and besides that there were very few of them, even in France.) the armor was comparable and it was very dependable. The camo is typical per-war Czech camo. The little flag on the turret is from my imagination. I can't find many photos of pre-war Czech armor in Czech service, but it seems logical they would have some sort of national markings on their vehicles. I did this one strictly OOTB. These 1/48 Tamiya kits are just a delight to build. Fit is excellent and detail is very good. Tjhe length and link tracks are nicely done, but can be fiddly to get right and you can see a couple of my problem areas if you look closely. If you're not an armor builder but wonder what all the fuss is about with armor models, give one of these 1/48 kits a try OOTB. I bet you'll have fun with it.
  34. 2 points
    Personally, my preference for GSB isn't based on a lack of confidence in my abilities or any other personal failing (of which I have many!). While I do occasionally have that self-hating artist streak, I will gladly enter into both 123 and GSB local and regional contests. And, not to brag too much, I do have a decent collection of hardware from both, so I would say that I can at least hold my own in my area of expertise. For me, the crux of the matter is that I believe GSB promotes and encourages a much healthier attitude towards competition and towards the hobby in general than 123.
  35. 2 points
    2021 is at the Rio?? Ok, that is a good location just off the strip. When my wife and I go to Vegas, we like to stay in either Caesar or the Bellagio, but we generally go for a particular show(Elton John last time). We are going in December to see Andre Bocelli and staying at the MGM Grand. The Rio is home to Penn & Teller. They put on a great show! Worth seeing! Plenty of other entertainment if you get bored with looking at models. Also some great stuff for significant others to do while you are ogling models. If she goes off to the gaming tables, you can use her winnings to finance you plastic habit it she wins and justify it if she loses.
  36. 2 points
    I don't like their paints anymore so no effect for me. Using Tamiya and others Dave
  37. 2 points
    The first thing we need to do for our own PR is talk up modeling when ever you can. Modeling is a solitary hobby mostly done by yourself in your hobby room so a Society like IPMS/USA is a great way to make new friends and meet people with like interests. My own experience came over 33 years ago when I joined my local club and was the only automotive modeler in the group. Took some time to get in with the group but I helped myself by inviting other automotive modelers I met along the way - 6 to 8. Some stayed and some left rather quickly and life took it toll also. PR is up to all of us and we have a harder time now than ever before due to the need for instant gratification that seems to be the norm today. Having recently moved to Hawaii, I was invited to an neighbor's BBQ to meet families in our neighborhood. During a conversation on history I asked the neighbor if he built models and found out the he and his oldest son had just begun doing just that. So I offered to be a resource for questions. That is how PR should be done - get out and ask. Have a nice day and build a model. David Von Almen, Gentleman Modeler (now in the islands)
  38. 2 points
    You could try to compare them visually with the new Foxbot set: More info HERE and HERE Regards, Aleksandar
  39. 2 points
  40. 2 points
    You're right.....all of us who tout GSB are really just aiming to undermine IPMSUSA and ruin the Nats. It can't possibly work (because it's never been done). And of course you, like the NCC, want a fully written and detailed proposal to be examined and parsed (and then dismissed) because it doesn't look plausible on paper (to you). That can never be done, so people who want complete assurance that it'll work with no problems or adjustments will never be comfortable with any "proposal". As I said before, I'm not saying you're wrong, but GSB proponents are making it work NOW. But, since you think you have a better idea, exactly where are YOU implementing your SWS? Where are you putting your ideas on the line to be tried? If we agree that the 1-2-3 system (although it does work) is the least beneficial to IPMSUSA for future growth of our Society, then start working towards making a change where you are. You may indeed have a better way, but I guarantee that even if you crossed all your T's and dotted your I's in a "proposal"; it would be dismissed by IPMSUSA and the NCC just as quickly as GSB (or simply put out in a "survey"). Show them how good your idea is by making it work at a successful local and/or regional show. As for our show, Jaxcon, we're looking to keep growing our show so that we HAVE to "scale up" our GSB system. We're already 1/3 the size of the Nats and hope to hit 1/2 (1000+ models) in the next 5yrs. We currently judge those 600+ models in 4-5hrs with only 20 or so judges. So yes, I DO think that 4 to 5 times that number of judges over 2-3 days could judge 2000-2500 models. Until that's actually put to the test, you and I will just have to agree to disagree. Part of this debate and discussion has a LOT to do with breaking "traditions". As I stated above, IPMSUSA does NOT like to do that, and thus not only do you have to prove a new system will work, you have to overcome people's wanting to poke holes in new ideas and their loathing of change. Best of luck, whichever side you end up on, I've covered everything I can think of. Y'all can have at it the rest of the way! GIL
  41. 2 points
    Noel, IPMS/USA is what I consider a supply-and-demand organization where the contest is concerned. There are a lot of A/C categories because they are the most popular plain and simple. As an ex-head ship judge for the society, Nationals chairman, and ex-NCC member, I can tell you our categories are based on what shows up on a consistent basis. The head judges for each category have yearly records for numbers entered as well as the type of models. When I was a head judge, if there was a consistent and potential growing number of say, Martian aircraft carriers over a three year period, I would put in a request to the Chief Judge that a category or split be added to next year's contest to accommodate the increase in those models. If the request was granted by vote of the NCC, the category was added on a three year trial basis. This was done to insure that it wasn't a one time occurrence, and could be removed if numbers went down for three consecutive years. Under-attended categories also face removal by the same system. I realize this sounds like it would take some time to expand category numbers such as automotive, but that's the tried and true way IPMS/USA regulates its categories. Furthermore, the NCC must consider the cost to the host chapter when adding categories. Ideally, every category should have a sponsor which never happens; so the host chapter must foot the bill for un-sponsored categories from their profit margin. In short, "build it and they will come".
  42. 2 points
    This was a bust I found on one of the announcement pages on FB. It's by Grimm. I tried looking for his info for this write up, but after an hr., I could find it. If I do I will make an edit and add it. The kit is one piece sculpt, very well done, in a gray resin - no bubbles, or seam marks. The figured reminded me of one of the villains in a Scooby-Doo cartoon, so decided to make him a ghost. Started with the black primer, and then was working on his navy colored coat. Then added a dark gray drybrush to the face, then added color to the barnicles, seeweed, and sweater. Another lighter gray - I want to make the glow coming from his face and OCL lighting on parts of the beard and coat. A little highlight to the coat and cap. I thought I took a pic of the ghostly glow, but didn't. The bluish,green glow color was made by drybrushing Citadel's Nihilakh Oxide where I needed it. I then highlighted that with V's Foundation White. I touch the Nihilakh Oxide and White to the rips in his coat to make it look like glow was coming out of them, and for a little added color. Thanks for looking.
  43. 2 points
    Finished the Saturn Knight. Additional images can be found here: MK44 SaturnKnight And I got the family together for the weekend.
  44. 2 points
    Continuing forward I assembled the wings and detailed the main landing gear bays. I assembled the rear gun using the resin version and the photo etch gun sight and mounted the cannon gun sight above the dash. I then mount the wings. Found another issue when mounting them. The kit has spars to support the wings. I ended up cutting these off the kit assembly and attaching them to the fuselage. It was not difficult and the wings lined up very well to the fuselage. The engines came then. They were detail painted and then the copper intercooler for the intake was installed. The engines were then put into their cowls and mounted to the wings. The wings were then installed and the entire fuselage was painted with the base coat. Weathered and added the belly 37mm cannon and then the landing gear was painted and installed. Next up will be the camouflage painting. You can see all the photos and details from the start in my build log at https://davidsscalemodels.com/build-log/1-48-ki-45-toryu-nick/
  45. 2 points
    Here are the final photos of my conversion of a Monogram F-105D kit into the prototype YF-105A, and here is the Build Thread And for a little comparison, the original Monogram F-105D alongside: If you check out the build thread, you will see that it was a long ride... Ed
  46. 2 points
    Scale Motorsport has just announced a new super detail set for the Revell GT 40 kit. It is not on their web site yet, but it is up on their facebook page. No information about what will be included but if I know Matthew Wells(and I do) it will be outstanding! Glad to see new product coming out! It has been a while.
  47. 2 points
    Two models completed in one year so far!! WooHoo!! 😁
  48. 2 points
    This week’s update on the F-22 is a small one. Between my oldest son’s graduation from college and life getting in the way I was not able to spend a lot of time on the bench. However I was able to complete the main weapons bay doors. The small doors had 14 parts and the larger doors had 50 parts each. The braces are 1mm X 1mm styrene stock and the hinge shaft is 28awg wire. Next I will be assembling the photo etch replacement missile bay doors and then priming all the doors for paint.
  49. 2 points
    Comments that are critical of ‘finding the flaws’ and ‘ignoring the bigger picture of what the model actually represents’ ( I don’t even know what that means) frustrate me as an experienced and scrupulously objective judge. As long as we as judges are required to identify three winners and X numbers of losers in a finite amount time, we will need a system that is efficient while also is able to be fairly applied to all entries. While theoretically you could compile all the things done correctly on each entry, that would be too time consuming. So efficient knowledgeable judges will start be looking for where most builders make common mistakes. These are craftsmanship competitions NOT an assessment of how much enthusiasm the modeler has for his or her subject. Likewise, the judges are not trying to answer the question: ‘What is the artist trying to say?’ In modeling contests, as in war, the winner is often the one who makes the fewest mistakes. There is a very simple way for the builder to get past this first cut of common faults. Read the Competition Handbook and do what it tells you to do. Despite this, the common errors appear with predictable frequency- admittedly more at the lower level shows than at the Nationals- but they are always there. Most categories will thankfully contain the gross misalignments, the wide-open seams, sloppy paint work, the silvered decals. Once these are out of the running, the really hard work in a 1,2,3 system begins. Now comes the necessary nit-picking. Now some of the virtues of a G,S,B system become apparent. But under either system, there are going to be disappointed entrants. If you do not want to be one of them, you have two choices: build better models or keep your models on the display-only table. Nick Filippone, Senior National Judge
  50. 2 points
    This week the Raptor build is moving forward with many details. To start with the kit does not come with any weapons so I purchased some Eduard Brassin AIM-9X and a few AIM-120’s to load up the weapons bays. I finished the main landing gear bay walls then moved on to the exhaust. The photo etch kit supplies the inside details of the exhaust. Once installed they were painted then weathered with pastel chalk. The top part of the fuselage is also the top of the main landing gear bays. I added the kit parts then detailed them with more wire and cable mounts. I turned to the intakes by painting them white and adding the decals. I like that the intakes assemble on the edges instead of the middle. Makes the intakes look seamless. Finally I assembled the fuselage halves together. This was a bit tricky especially around the intake openings. But once I got it lined up and some minor trimming they fit well. Will need some minor putty in a couple of areas to smooth out some minor gaps. The next step is to address the fuselage and some overly thick RAM panels. See all the photos and notes from the start at https://davidsscalemodels.com/build-log/1-48-f-22-raptor/
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