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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/12/2020 in all areas

  1. Always on the lookout for the obscure, odd or prototype planes, I found this little gem on the pages of SAMI where the kit was being reviewed. Having gotten these models few times this way, a quick trip to eBay, and I had a choice of a number of these kits. The Sam-13 (Cam-13) was designed in pre-war Russia, and based around Renault 6 cylinder engines. One prototype was built. But this was destroyed as the Soviets fell back against the German invasion of the eastern front. The design was never revisited. It came with 2 sprues of gray plastic, one (mostly) clear canopy, a fret of PE, and a small sheet of decals. There was a few oops' along the way but all in all it was a fun kit. The instructions are the typical exploded views, where the exact location of some parts are hard to determine. The other issue with the kits was that the plastic was pretty fragile. I broke the back off the seat off twice, by apparently leaning on it too heavily. There were no locator pins so the parts wanted to wander until the glue set up. It wasn't mentioned but with that rear boom, I didn't want to take any chances, and added Liquid Gravity to keep it from being a tail sitter. The horizontal tail fin was a tight fit, and I should have done something about it. While it was drying, it popped out a little on one side and the glue dried that way. 😞 Lesson learned. Also after folding a piece of semi-large PE it jumped, hit the ground and was eaten. I actually laid on the floor looking for it to no avail. 😞 With no specific color call outs I used what I had. The gray was Vs Sky Gray and the blue was RLM 24. I did blacken the panel lines a bit with Vs NATO Black. The real plane was wooden so I left it with a matte clear coat. Sitting the canopy on the plane, I was amazed to see that the canopy was a perfect fit - until it came time to glue it on the the fuselage. What happened? 😞 After adding the landing gear I called it done. Thanks for looking.
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  2. Wayne taught me and many of the other Judges of my vintage how to judge. He always displayed tact and charm and a civilized, cultured demeanor. However, like the good soldier and leader that he was, he demanded excellence in modeling and judging. He inspired us to be discerning and scrupulous in examining every aspect of the model when judging. I recall some of his noteworthy and characteristically pithy aphorisms: β€œA hole ( cockpit, landing gear bay, bomb bay) is to look in.” β€œ The modeler finished before he was done.” Even more importantly, he demanded absolute integrity from his Judges. We all sought to be as wise and Solomon-like as Wayne. He was a courageous patriot and pilot. His courtly manner exemplified β€œan officer and a gentleman. β€œ His was a life well led. I consider myself fortunate to have been his student. I will always recall him with respect and fondness. Respectfully, Nick Filippone
    1 point
  3. It wasn’t my fault! Gil made me do it! πŸ™€ LOL! Nick
    1 point
  4. Wayne was not only the head aircraft judge, he was the Chief Judge of the National Contest for years. He basically created the system we have now. I learned how to judge while he was in charge. He was a great leader and a good man. Thank you, Wayne, for all you did.
    1 point
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