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  1. 2 points
    Scale Motorsport has just announced a new super detail set for the Revell GT 40 kit. It is not on their web site yet, but it is up on their facebook page. No information about what will be included but if I know Matthew Wells(and I do) it will be outstanding! Glad to see new product coming out! It has been a while.
  2. 2 points
    This week the Raptor build is moving forward with many details. To start with the kit does not come with any weapons so I purchased some Eduard Brassin AIM-9X and a few AIM-120’s to load up the weapons bays. I finished the main landing gear bay walls then moved on to the exhaust. The photo etch kit supplies the inside details of the exhaust. Once installed they were painted then weathered with pastel chalk. The top part of the fuselage is also the top of the main landing gear bays. I added the kit parts then detailed them with more wire and cable mounts. I turned to the intakes by painting them white and adding the decals. I like that the intakes assemble on the edges instead of the middle. Makes the intakes look seamless. Finally I assembled the fuselage halves together. This was a bit tricky especially around the intake openings. But once I got it lined up and some minor trimming they fit well. Will need some minor putty in a couple of areas to smooth out some minor gaps. The next step is to address the fuselage and some overly thick RAM panels. See all the photos and notes from the start at https://davidsscalemodels.com/build-log/1-48-f-22-raptor/
  3. 2 points
    My model is the Italeri 1/72 scale Fiat CR-32 Chirri." It represents an aircraft assigned to XXIII Grupo Caccia, Aviazione Legionaria. The unit was led by Lieutenant Colonel Andrea Zotti and based at Puig Moreno, Spain, June-July 1938. The unit formed part of the Italian contingent fighting for the Nationalist cause during the Spanish Civil War. I used the Osprey Fiat CR-32 Aces of the Spanish Civil War (Aircraft of the Aces 94) for inspiration; profile 28. I wanted to model Zotti's aircraft; he flew "3-4", but I only had the decals for "3-6". The model was built out-of-the-box except for the rigging. Took me 3-months to figure out I can't paint Italian camouflage with an airbrush freehand and another 3-months and a lot of Tamiya tape to manage that effort. I enjoyed the build; never worked harder to complete a model...
  4. 2 points
    Continuing onward this week I am working on the main landing gear bays. After locating reference photos on Google, I started by drilling many, many holes to install the numerous hydraulic lines. Using a .09 drill bit I drilled out the many locations where the lines go to. I then took 32 awg wire and ran the individual lines. I then added the electrical cables and routed them. Still have a couple of more lines to run then need to do all the yellow and blue connections and holders on the lines. Then I can weather and highlight the bays. See all the photos from start at https://davidsscalemodels.com/build-log/1-48-f-22-raptor/
  5. 2 points
    Kudos for one of the Head Judges and NCC member for monitoring and stepping up to answer a rules question in a concise manner. This gives us an authoritative determination of the rule, as opposed to the rest of us offering our opinions. I hope more Head Judges follow this example! GIL
  6. 1 point
    The PC 10 was Model Master Green Drab. The linen was also Model Master, but i can't remember it's name. 'Course, Model Master Enamels are now out of production, but you can still find some on the interweb.
  7. 1 point
    I'm still at it with these old Aurora WW I biplanes. Found this one at a local show and it's bit rarer than others so I snapped it up. It's the Monogram boxing, so the decal locators were removed from the molds, which made life a lot easier. The only thing I did was add a basic interior and drill out the exhaust pipes and Lewis guns. The kit has a four bladed prop, which was only used on Brisfits with a particular engine. In addition, it has a dual Lewis gun mount, which the gunners did not like as it was bulkier and heavier and more difficult to bring to bear on a target. Anyhoo, here 'tis.
  8. 1 point
    My name is Oliver. I am a new member. Heres what i working on. Happy to be part of the IPMS forum family. Oliver
  9. 1 point
  10. 1 point
    Hello guys These are the things I've been working on lately, as my hands shake more and more with the passing of the years I'm dedicating more time to the 3d designing and some less to the "real" plastic things. Anyway these designs are later 3d printed so I can see them built and painted in the finished models. I hope you like them.
  11. 1 point
    I am using the Glue Looper. It is an awesome tool to apply CA glue. I have used it for applying Tamiya thin glue as well. For CA glue I place a small pool in an aluminum dish and dip the tip of the tool into the glue. Just touch the edge and the glue flows under the PE and there is no excess to be seen. Gives me a very clean looking bond. I use to use dental picks but this tool works a lot better and is very precise. Especially when glue very small PE parts. https://davidsscalemodels.com/tips-and-tricks/photo-etch-tools/
  12. 1 point
    This week’s update on the F-22 is a small one. Between my oldest son’s graduation from college and life getting in the way I was not able to spend a lot of time on the bench. However I was able to complete the main weapons bay doors. The small doors had 14 parts and the larger doors had 50 parts each. The braces are 1mm X 1mm styrene stock and the hinge shaft is 28awg wire. Next I will be assembling the photo etch replacement missile bay doors and then priming all the doors for paint.
  13. 1 point
    Comments that are critical of ‘finding the flaws’ and ‘ignoring the bigger picture of what the model actually represents’ ( I don’t even know what that means) frustrate me as an experienced and scrupulously objective judge. As long as we as judges are required to identify three winners and X numbers of losers in a finite amount time, we will need a system that is efficient while also is able to be fairly applied to all entries. While theoretically you could compile all the things done correctly on each entry, that would be too time consuming. So efficient knowledgeable judges will start be looking for where most builders make common mistakes. These are craftsmanship competitions NOT an assessment of how much enthusiasm the modeler has for his or her subject. Likewise, the judges are not trying to answer the question: ‘What is the artist trying to say?’ In modeling contests, as in war, the winner is often the one who makes the fewest mistakes. There is a very simple way for the builder to get past this first cut of common faults. Read the Competition Handbook and do what it tells you to do. Despite this, the common errors appear with predictable frequency- admittedly more at the lower level shows than at the Nationals- but they are always there. Most categories will thankfully contain the gross misalignments, the wide-open seams, sloppy paint work, the silvered decals. Once these are out of the running, the really hard work in a 1,2,3 system begins. Now comes the necessary nit-picking. Now some of the virtues of a G,S,B system become apparent. But under either system, there are going to be disappointed entrants. If you do not want to be one of them, you have two choices: build better models or keep your models on the display-only table. Nick Filippone, Senior National Judge
  14. 1 point
    This was a difficult build because it's a limited run style kit. It does have some very nice resin and PE details, but very few locating pins, fair to poor fit, and you really need to deviate from the instructions to get the best results. The kit decals are one of the better items included, though I only used the data, stenciling, modexes, and stars. The nose art and others are from an aftermarket sheet. Here's a link to the in progress shots on Agapemodels if you want to see how it was built: https://www.agapemodelersforum.com/index.php?topic=23336.0 I used AK metalics Aluminum for the overall finish and then did the varying panels with Alclad Dull Aluminum. The red is Testsors (small bottle) enamel thinned with lacquer thinner. I made the gun barrels from steel tubing. I'm happy with the result, but I can't really recommend this kit to others unless you have some experience with limited run kits, vacs, or resin kits. There's a lot of re-engineering and alterations needed to get the best result. Comments, questions, and critiques welcome, as always. Cheers! GIL
  15. 1 point
    A few weeks ago, this appeared in my inbox, and I thought about responding then; but then more serious priorities came up and I was unable to follow up on what I had wanted to say. That said, IPMS uses an unweighted system that is frequently unworkable at the local level. National judging criteria has been online forever; but my experiences been that nobody actually ever reads the national rules, and put them into practice. I have been a member of IPMS since February 1967, I have been to a lot of contests; I have judged many of them, including a Nationals a decade or so ago. As president of the Sacramento IPMS Silverwings Chapter for 10 years, I have done my share of running contests. I have also taken home my share of awards over the years. IPMS is one of the few competitive organizations that I am aware of that absolutely refuses to use some form of numerical standard for evaluation of competitor performance. Think of it, everybody else uses a point system to evaluate performance in various categories of competition, whether as professional sports, Olympic competition, such as figure skating, or whatever, they all use a point system. We do not. We use a system that is inherently arbitrary, inefficient, inconsistent, and mostly focuses on inconsequentials. Go to any collection of models in a contest, and it is an absolute guarantee that 95 percent of them will have obvious flaws, whether it is in alignments, sloppy painting, flawed construction technique; you name it. In many contests, models of differing scales are lumped together for no other reason that the number of entrants in any standard scale are likely to be insufficient to generate effective competition. All biplanes together; all airliners together, sci-fi, automobiles; whatever. Actual accomplishment is rarely considered. I would be the first to agree that modelers often attempt projects for which they all too often have insufficient skill, commitment, or patience to do the job properly. On the other hand, there are modeling venues, especially among older modelers, where some models might take years to complete, such as model shipbuilding, where built up hulls are laboriously constructed from hand cut frames; plank-on-frame exterior, rigging, and all the other features and accouterments of old-time men-'o-war take years of study and practice to do the job properly. Needless to say, we do not see much of that in our contests. In the contest itself, getting people to judge can be like pulling teeth. I can remember occasions where I personally judged nine categories of models in a single afternoon, often with one another judge. That makes for a long afternoon. It also makes it tough to get the awards announced, and getting people on their way back home before late afternoon. And Sacramento has long had the reputation of running the better-attended contests in Northern California. This next month, we will be hosting a judging clinic at our monthly meetings in order to get potential judges primed and ready to go, both at our contest, and elsewhere in our area. This is long overdue. If I could put one finger on where things go wrong, it would be that judges get hyper-focused on one aspect of model judging, typically looking for flaws rather than looking for quality of work. And by quality work, I am talking about balance. I have seen judges looking inside jet air intakes looking for scratch marks that no one can see without a penlight, looking way in the back, just to be able to find something on which to hang his hat in order to make a decision. At the same time, sloppy detailing in paintwork and decaling often go unnoticed. Environmental effects such as weathering are overdone or are inappropriate to the era and circumstances that the model is supposed to represent (paint chipping on a sea-borne, carrier-based aircraft? Really?) That is absurd! And it is also unfair. I see three or four so-called 'experts' hyper focused on trying to decide which is Number One, and which will be Number Two, when there are still several other categories of models that need to be judged, and judged efficiently. There are ways to do that, and do it efficiently; but it does require the judging cadre to be able to separate out the important from the accidental or inconsequential. Regrettably, this penchant for 'finding the flaw' has been baked into their consciousness to the extent that they cannot imagine any other consideration. At the same time, the meter is running, and people are getting impatient to pack up and go home! At the national level, we do have judges who know what they are doing; at the local level, not so much. After doing this stuff for more than 50 years, I have come to the conclusion that things will not get any better, because the untrained new guys are taught to ignore the bigger picture of what the model actually represents, and instead, they are told to get down into the weeds and add up the perceived mistakes and flaws in execution. Pretty sad, when you come to think of it. And that is one of the reasons why it is so hard to get people to judge contests. That may also be the reason why over the past decade or so, model contests have become progressively fewer in number, and have fewer attendees. Those modelers who attend contests tend to be older. Model making as a pastime tends to attract older men generally nowadays, even as the quality of model kits has never been better. But, with better and more detailed kits now available, expectations have also risen over what modelers expect of themselves by way of accomplishment. Nitpicking and flies pecking is not the way to grow the hobby. Whether the Gold-Silver-Bronze is a better one from the one that we have now I could not say for sure; but the one thing I can be sure of is that the existing system is not worth a damn, not the way it is being done now! At least with the GSB system, there is the hope and expectation that quality standards would predominate, or at least get a fair hearing. I do not see that happening with the existing IPMS system. Art Silen IPMS No. 1708
  16. 1 point
    Gentlemen, If your a rotor head like me, you need to get this kit. I picked it up from my hobby store here last week. Academy did a great job putting this one together. My only issue is the lack of seatbelts. I’ll make some up from my spare parts cabinet. Academy has incorporated slide molding on several of the parts in the kit.( tail boom, weapons pylons). The surface detail is very good, and not over scaled. The fit of the parts is great. Decals are from Cartograf. I’ve already got a lot of the model built, (Thanks to slide molding). The hellfire missiles also come in one piece. The main rotor built quickly, but took a while to paint. The tailrotor, and 90 degree gear box have a lot of detail. I should be done with the model by Wednesday. I’ll start working on the display base Thursday. Regards Christopher.
  17. 1 point
    Let me clarify... IF IPMS was to go to Open Judging, the category structure as we know it *should* be simplified quite a bit. Using the Aircraft class as an example: CLASS: Aircraft Categories: Aircraft, Allied/NATO, Prop (by markings) Aircraft, Axis/WarPac, Jet (by markings) Aircraft, Civil (by markings) Aircraft, Rotary Wing Remember, this is a gross simplification, should this system be developed, who knows how it will shake out? So, here's how it works. You build six P-51's--three from the 8th AF, one as a captures Zirkus Rosarius airplane, and one as "Thunderbird", the race airplane that took part in getting the film of QEII's coronation to North America. So, you have three airplanes in Category #1, and one each in #2 and #3. Why? The Zirkus Rosarius airplane carries Luftwaffe (Axis) markings, and "Thunderbird" carries a civil registration. Now, in Category #1, two models earn a Silver and one earns Bronze. You take home ONE silver medal. The other two earn Gold in their categories, so you will also take home two Golds. If you built all six as Allied airplanes, they would all enter into Category #1, and you would take home ONE medal corresponding to the highest award earned. So, say one earned Gold, three earned Silver, one earned Bronze, and one didn't quite make the cut--you take home a Gold medal, period. In this scenario, each model is being evaluated on its own, so it won't matter that you have different scales, or single vs. multi engine airplanes in the same Category. Whether you keep a numeric score or use the Chattanooga/First Coast rules, no model is compared to another. In my scenario, the ONLY time one model is compared to another is when it comes time to award Best Aircraft. In that case, all the Gold medal models are grouped and judges as we do under the current IPMS/USA system. Again, though, a lot of things need to happen before we get there. First, the poll needs to show that the membership supports a change. Then, the system needs to be devised, written, and approved. That's a far way off right now... Cheers! Ralph
  18. 1 point
    Finally completed the base. I'm happy with it. This was a really fun build. Academy consistently put out great kits. This one, by far, has been their best. Regards Christopher
  19. 1 point
    Looks like you should be paid aircraft union scale wages with the amount of work and detailing you're putting into it! Lots of eye candy! GIL
  20. 1 point
    The helicopter is just about finished. I have to add some pastel chalk streaks, and REMOVE BEFORE FLIGHT tags. I've started on the base todays
  21. 1 point
    It doesn't matter what style of contest you enter, you are still building to "a standard". Those not familiar with Open Judging hold that out as the stinky diaper, when, in effect, "the standard" is exactly what is laid out in the IPMS Modelers Guild to Contests as it is written and published to the IPMS/USA website. And what, you might be asking, is the standard? It all hearkens back to craftsmanship: Molding defects (ejection pin marks, sink marks, mold parting lines/flash, mold shift, excessive draft angles, etc.) addressed. Tight, gap-free glue seams with no glue slop. Model properly aligned (everything straight, square, and plumb). Construction defects (gaps, seams, steps, scratches, knife marks) addressed. Finish flaws (thick paint, thin paint, runny paint, rough paint, sloppy paint, decal silvering) addressed. In a nutshell, that's what ANY contest judge worth his or her salt looks for, regardless of whether it is a "1-2-3" or "Open Judging" system.
  22. 1 point
    Really cool subject Ora. Great build. Thank you for posting it Regards Christopher
  23. 1 point
    Beautiful aircraft Ora! You did an exceptional job on it. Well done!
  24. 1 point
    This is a 537 scale kitbash I did last year. USS Akula is a Lynch Class Light Destroyer. Ship design is by Eric Kristiansen who has published several books on Federation ships and technology, most notably the Jackills Guide to Federation Ships. Akula has custom decals from Jbot, lower deflector dish from Federation Models, scratchbuilt connecting dorsal and a 4 color "Aztec" paint scheme using McKenzie water based taxidermy colors. I also put hatches for "life boats" on this build. I am currently working on Akula's sister ship, a 1.350 scale Lynch Class which I am making my first attempt at lighting ( so far so good! lol)
  25. 1 point
    I agree, exceptional article! That was fun to read!
  26. 1 point
  27. 1 point
    Work continues on the fuselage of the Raptor. To start with the RAM panels on the fuselage are very thick. In scale they would be 4” thick! So I grabbed some 600 grit wet/dry sandpaper and went to work wet sanding all of them. The 600 did a nice job thinning them out. I then wet sanded with 800 grit, 1000 grit, and finally 2000 grit. This removed any sanding marks. Once the few photo etch vent panels were applied I looked into the paint scheme. Using some home experimenting mixology I ended up with the following colors. The lightest color is 3 parts light ghost gray and 1 part flat white. The median color is 9 parts dark ghost gray and 1 part gunship gray, the vent panels are gunship gray and I will be using neutral gray for the last color for the scheme. The final color “blobs” will be applied with an airbrush so I can get a good fade line between the colors. The paint on the actual F-22 has a color changing hue similar to a pearlized clear coat. This causes the aircraft to appear to lighten and darken depending on the angle of the light. I am still experimenting with different ideas on how to accomplish this. Once I figure out the process it will be applied as a final coat after the decals. I am now working on the landing gear. So far the nose gear is just about ready to install. I will attach the landing lights later so that the final pant coat doesn’t affect the clear parts. You can see this build from start to current progress in my build log at https://davidsscalemodels.com/build-log/1-48-f-22-raptor/
  28. 1 point
    Hi all, This was supposed to be a quick build, which it basically was. I started putting things together and before I knew it, it was practically done. I added some seatbelts in the cockpit and some brake lines and such on the landing gear. I also took the step out of the the leading edge slat area (the red area) where the top of the wing transitions to the slat well. The paint scheme came from the Classic Air Frames 1/48 kit. Paints used were Vallejo and Model Master. I resized the CA decal sheet from the kit and printed it on my computer. Overall they came out pretty good. I like the color scheme with the three blues/grays. This kit is ancient but it fit great. The detail is accurate and there aren't a million pieces. What's not to like? Any comments always welcome. Bill
  29. 1 point
    Actually a very ingenious article on revamping and reposing a skeleton! Nice one Osa! GIL
  30. 1 point
    That's excellent Ora! I think mine came in recently, gonna take a closer look.
  31. 1 point
    Gil, I chose to do a more subdued scheme.
  32. 1 point
    Haha! Cripes a Mighty it is- thanks for the help Dave
  33. 1 point
  34. 1 point
  35. 1 point
    My regular First Order TIE fighter arrived. It looks as nice as the Special Forces one. I wonder if they make Rylo Ren's TIE from the second movie? I know Revell did the lights one, but Bandai's would be much better.
  36. 1 point
    Thanks guys! Gil: Stubo is short for Sturzbomber or dive-bomber . I would have been used to carry one 1000kg bomb. There was a stubbier one - Stubo I - that would have carried a 500kg bomb.
  37. 1 point
    This was a model I've wanted to get out of my stack for a while. The Stubo II is a Fantastic Plastic offering, that comes back in stock every once in a while. It's another one of the German WW2 planes that never made it off the drawing board. I *really* like this genre! 🙂 The kit comes in 14 parts including a seat and stick, which you'll never see, and I left out. The canopy is clear but following the directions, the majority of it gets painted. Being cast by Anigrand, you know you are getting a good kit. As usual, the parts went together with minimal effort. One thing I noticed with this kit is if the fuselage holes don't match the pins in the wings - swap the wings, don't clip the pins. They are made to fit only to one side. Cool idea! A lil seam filling. The process continued effortlessly, and a coat of white paint, for the fuselage, and V. Game Color Gory Red, was the shade of red I chose. Then it was time for the decals. The decals went on just as effortless as the rest of the build. After a short wait the Micro-Sol went on and suck the decals into all the panel lines perfectly. It was here that I noticed that there was no decal for the gun placement. It wasn't sculpted into the fuselage, so I thought it was a decal. Looking closely at the instruction sheet, it says the model was created after the original which didn't have guns. So if I wanted I could carve wells into the fuselage (THAT wasn't going to happen) or I could create a decals for it. Umm, didn't the FP guy create decals for his? Why couldn't his design be added to the decals sheet? Even if it added another $1 to the price of the kit, I'd pay it. Having no ability to create a drawing for a decal, mine will do without. Hard to see - the skid also went in place with no problems. Looking back one thing I should have done that I didn't was paint the inside of the canopy. With the white paint on the outside and the light tan resin showing on the inside, the windows almost disappear. I'll have to keep that in mind for the next time. While I was waiting for the clear coat covering the decals to dry I went apart creating a base for it. It consists of a square of foam that it coated in DAPs Plastic Wood. I started out using a spatula, but it seemed to go on faster and smoother with just a wet finger. Being the craft just has one landing skid, I created a mini sawhorse to level the plane for display. All done. Thanks for looking. I used Chinchilla Dust for the dirt. Is much more in scale than regular sand.
  38. 1 point
    Here's my latest scores I got. I got these at my local So Cal AMPS meeting where they were having their semi-annual kit auction. This was the first one I'd been to and of course, I was flat broke! Still a friend offered to buy me what I wanted and I'd pay him back from the proceeds of my latest job that I just finished. These are the items I wanted to buy that he got for me. First was a paint rack. Here it is all assembled: I don't have much in the way of Vallejo paints, but I'll make this work. The only model that really screamed at me was this one: Modelcollect's 1/72 scale BMP-3 that I'd had on my list for awhile. Finally I got one: Now here's where it gets interesting. These So Cal AMPS guys are the best around! Three other AMPS members also purchased a number of 1/72 scale kits that they then passed on to me as gifts! Here is the haul from all these generous people! First is these two boxes. They both contain two complete helicopter kits inside each box: One of each will be made into alternate helicopters for the "In Another World" campaign on the Modeler's Alliance.... Next were these three kits, a Revell and two ancient ESCI kits: Finally there were all these Airfix and Matchbox kits: The M-19 will be made Israeli, and the Monty's Caravan truck will be converted to a cargo truck since I already have the whole Monty's Caravan set already built.... with a full interior! I have a few other ideas for all the rest as well. Thanks again to all the generous AMPS guys in my club! What a magnificent group they are!
  39. 1 point
    After some marathon building over the past couple days, I finally have a few models to show. These are my armor models completed as of yesterday. I have eight of them finally done. First is the 1/72 scale ACE Italian 508CN Coloniale Staff car: My apologies for the poor pics. This is a tiny one and I seemed to have had a tough time keeping steady on this one. In keeping with the theme of tiny vehicles and such, here is my 1/72 scale Airfix British Airborne Jeep from the British Airborne Set: It also came with a pallet to land this thing from aircraft. Here it is sitting on that pallet: This Jeep above was also equipped with a trailer: It was also equipped with a 75mm Pack Howitzer to assist airborne troops with artillery support: Here is the whole British Airborne Set together: Next up, my Japanese Army takes delivery of the 1/72 scale IBG Type 3 Chi Nu Medium Tank: And finally, my Russian Army has taken delivery of three new vehicles. This first one is the 1/72 scale ACE BREM recovery vehicle: It doesn't show well in these pics, but that hook is painted a steel color. I don't know why it shows up this way. Moving on, I also finished up the 1/72 scale Takom MAZ-537 Tractor: Also, in that same kit was the 1/72 scale Takom KZKT-537 Tractor: And that completes my latest run of models for April. I might even have more finished in a week or three. Stay tuned and thanks for looking in, comments are welcome.
  40. 1 point
    David, FWIW, this survey has nothing to do whatsoever with IPMS/USA switching to GSB. It is merely an informational survey that the E-board asked several members put together to provide an accurate and up-to-date accounting of the memberships' judging preference. It's been a good five years since the last GSB/123 survey was done and the E-board felt it was time for another. IMHO, it should be done every five years since the membership constantly changes.
  41. 1 point
    Thanks Bob! I do enjoy doing commissions as long as I don't have a lot of them to do at the same time. I have also surprised people with models that they never saw coming. One was a Navy nurse who was at Pearl Harbor in WWII on board the USS Mercy, and another was a stage manager for our production of "Ragtime". She got a model of a Model T Ford like the one Coalhouse drove in the show.
  42. 1 point
    Maybe instead of an abstain selection, maybe there could be a "No preference" vote for those who don't care which system is used as long as awards are being offered for competition. I for one really have no preference for the system used; I would enjoy the contest either way. Something to consider.
  43. 1 point
    Very nice, the work is great
  44. 1 point
    Ok, they must have some time on their hands at the museum today. This is the second video release in the last hour.
  45. 1 point
    I follow the Air Force museum Face book page and they just posted this video of the cockpit of their 262. I was somewhat taken back by the simplicity of it. I suppose that is because I am more use to cockpits that have more Nav/aids. At any rate, enjoy.
  46. 1 point
    From Faller, N-scale (1/160);
  47. 1 point
    Love the Gillman. Great paint job Dave
  48. 1 point
    LOL...great..I need to buy more paint Dave
  49. 1 point
    MY experience with IPMS "haters" who criticize the importance we place on craftsmanship is that they are modelers who are sorely lacking in craftsmanship themselves. They cannot win a contest so those who can put too much emphasis on craftsmanship. Building a model without trying to do a good job is like playing golf with no particular concern whether the ball ever gets in the cup. Since I joined IPMS in 1964, I have had to listen to the likes of AMSO criticize this venerable organization and its 1/2 century endeavour to raise plastic modelling from the low regard in which it was held ( remember when the wood modelers thought that WE were the ones lacking in craftsmanship?) to the level of excellence it now enjoys. I have long since run out of patience with modelers jealous of what IPMS members have achieved individually and collectively through hard work and a demand for excellence to make plastic modelling every bit as sophisticated and respectable as hand carved balsa and basswood modelling. This was always one of our earliest goals. Hence, I will eschew any semblance of modelling "political correctness!" I will not take back what I said above nor will I apologize for it. As long as such people as AMSO members keep their comments to themselves, I will forbear to criticize them. But once they start the childish nonsense such as was reported above, then they better be prepared to knock the chip off my shoulder that I unashamedly wear for IPMS. Nick Filippone, IPMS #969 and proud enough of it to stick up for it!
  50. 1 point
    PeteJ, I started this thread not as criticism, but as curiosity if others have encountered such groups. In my description of the AMSO group, I have very charitable of them. They are not really that creative, but merely use it as a an excuse to justify poor craftsmanship. I realize everyone builds models for their own reasons and we have several in both the local IPMS chapters who only build for themselves. They have no interests in contests, nor do they try to build at a high competitive level. I like them and have great respect for them for they accept both complements and suggestions with good grace. You can be extremely creative and be a good craftsman, I have seen that constantly at the Nationals. The man I described in the earlier post hardly ever built a model, but from day one was constantly pestering people to trade stuff with him. And he kept at it until I told him to leave me the F alone. This was not a difference in how to build, but about common courtesy. One was posting racist remarks on the internet and another was a drunk constantly stinking of beer. I would disagree that creativity doesn't win or isn't considered, particularly in the final stages of judging. My experience says those who feel the creativity of their model is over looked, are just trying to rationalize their failure, but it is true different groups see "good craftsmanship" differently. These two photos from OHMS show both creativity and good craftsmanship, IMO. That's Manta Ray Charles, by the way. Dak
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