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  1. 3 points
    http://culttvman.com/main/a-modelers-guide-to-painting-the-starship-enterprise-by-gary-kerr/ http://culttvman.com/main/a-modelers-guide-to-painting-the-starship-enterprise-pt2-by-gary-kerr/
  2. 2 points
    I think what's interesting is that the 1-2-3 description actually is written as a NEGATIVE towards GSB! Here are some examples: 1) " Entries aren’t compared to any “ideal”, “perfect-model”, or “national-standards” criteria". Strictly speaking that's true, but they make it sound like having a standard to WIN an award (NOT enter the contest) is a bad thing. Every club that does GSB KNOWS that to be false! And there IS a Standard in GSB... Those same BASICS! 2) "Judges are your IPMS peers"... Seems to imply that GSB uses wizards or outsiders from the GSB galaxy to judge at those shows. Nope! Turns out it's ALSO your "IPMS peers"! 3) " Recording results for just the 600 winners now requires 8 staff, transcribing scoring from just 200 sheets of paper" (etc)...Implies that GSB judging would be IMPOSSIBLE at the Nats because of the logistics of how 1-2-3 is done. FAILS to point out that EVERY GSB system used or proposed does NOT use that 1-2-3 system of recording. IF GSB were ever to be used at a Nats, the system would be entirely different. 4) " How many ‘extras’ of each award level should a host chapter plan to order, ‘just in case’? Just one per category (200 more)? Two or more per category? 2,350 awards – just in case?" This next paragraph rightly points out the differences between the number of awards needed between the two systems. However, it WRONGLY implies that you could NEVER know how much you need! This is dealt with by EVERY GSB show in the nation EVERY year; so it IS something you can "learn". Would GSB be a "higher cost" system? YES! But then THAT is the crux of the debate: Should IPMSUSA look to reward MORE deserving builds than they do now? And with the profits that are being made, IPMS CAN afford to by some more awards! The debate, and the PURPOSE of this survey is to try to determine if the general membership thinks that's a good idea or not. 5) " Our convention attendees want a ‘contest’ "; THAT is a BLATANT assumption, and actually not true! There's enough of a question about that to lead to this survey being done! It also implies that GSB attendees aren't looking to "win" (as opposed to "contest" attendees). Baloney! GSB contestants want to win as MUCH as they can; they just prefer to do so while NOT "beating" anyone else, and (when they do win) not limit anyone else's ability to win. 6) " How many ‘For Display Only’ entries do you ever see at any of our conventions?" What has THAT to do with models in a CONTEST, be it GSB or 1-2-3? People who want to compete enter the show, be it GSB or 1-2-3. Those who prefer to display do that, no matter what format is being used there! 7) " Want to be the one of the few entrants not even good enough to earn a Bronze award – ‘not up to national standards’? MISLEADINGLY implies that a Standard that determines WINNERS (not the ability to enter the show) is somehow mean. Well, how does it feel in a 1-2-3 show to go home EMPTY HANDED and not knowing if you even made the cut? BOTH systems still have "losers"...but GSB will have FEWER "losers" than 1-2-3! 8- " Our contest results and awards are a fair recognition of our entrants’ outstanding model-making accomplishments" BLATANT BALONEY! In ANY 1-2-3 category with 10-25 entries at the Nats there are 7-22 that go home with NO idea of how they did!! There are HUNDREDS of outstandingly built models that go COMPLETELY unrecognized because the judges decide that there are 3 there THAT day that are "better". The "fair recognition" is ONLY truly fair for the top 3 winners! There's a LOT of advantages for 1-2-3 in IPMSUSA, and the system has some positives that make it preferable to many. There was NO need to write the above in such a negative way. Instead of touting the positives and advantages 1-2-3 offers IPMS members, it's written to PUT DOWN GSB. As the IPMS USA Chief Judge, I could understand if Mr. Persechetti wrote an enthusiastic support for 1-2-3. However, he chose to write it as a condemnation, and actually showed his ignorance of GSB in doing so. I'm greatly disappointed and disgusted with his lack of character and honesty in this matter! Gil
  3. 2 points
    Dak, you make a valid point. However, I would suggest that it isn't limited to the IPMS/USA. The current "I'm Offended" culture that has developed in this country has to be a major factor. Keep in mind that practically anything that exists has the potential to offend anyone, but it has gotten completely out of control. Consider the efforts to make the Washington Redskins football team change their name because 'Redskins" is offensive to one small tribe. Other people are offended by the use of certain words, while others by actual historical events. Look at the complaints that started with objections to the Confederate Battle Flag...actually the Battle Flag of Northern Virginia...and expanded to statues of Confederate heros and schools that were named for men who had virtually no connection to the Confederacy other than fighting for the South. Political views are now subject to similar bias. Liberal viewpoints are widely publicized, while those of a conservative bent are castigated or banned. I was unable to market an article to a magazine I wrote for because the model in question....a Peterbilt 377 with an American Bald Eagle w/crossed American & Confederate flags on the air dam....was refused because "it might offend someone". If I did that model today as an ebook, I would be forced to apologize for it, accused of being a racist and required to remove the ebook from the marketplace. And if you want to get an idea of just how hypersensitive people are getting...as well as ignorant...I very recently had a magazine article corrected by my editor because "I've never heard of it, so I'm sure no one else has ever heard of it!" What was it? Believe it or not, a Mexican Jumping Bean. Instead, the editor changed Mexican Jumping Bean to simply 'jumping bean", thereby identifying every bean on the planet as a jumping bean! And if you think all of the above is a recent development, it's just the extreme result. Tony Weddel, a deceased aviation artist and my friend, quit doing heavy combat aviation art back in the late '70s or early '80s because he could no longer sell the art or prints. Why? Because people didn't want to purchase art that depicted violence. Result? He wound up doing pretty paintings of aircraft against storm clouds or toned down combat...unless a client specifically requested heavy combat. That, by the way, leads to your comment about viewing scenes of violence in model dioramas. Incidentally, it's also the reason why I've never created a crucifixion diorama of my own....it would offend virtually everyone who saw it. I have no idea where this is going to end, but if you build models, dioramas, articles and/or books for a living, it's already having an impact on what you can produce without offending someone. And it doesn't matter if it's a group or a single person. Dak, in case you're wondering, I'm 76 and I have no more problem viewing real life scenes than you do. I knew a preacher who I offered a copy of my P-38 CD-ROM to, warning him that it had a lot of nose art images containing pinup or semi-nude figures. His response? It's history. It'll be interesting to see what kinds of responses I get to this little tirade. Richard
  4. 2 points
    Anyway, here is my last acquisition I got last year as a Christmas gift to myself. I didn't post it above because for some reason the camera could not focus on the box and all my pics were blurry. This time, after considerable effort; I have a pic to show: I had wanted that since it came out. I figured it was time since I had Christmas money to burn. I hope to get started on it this year.
  5. 2 points
    Hey Ron...First off...I think you'll enjoy build scale cars, if you like 1/1 cars. OK..to try and answer your questions... Personally... I strip all the chrome(using concentrated laundry bleach...Clorox is what I use) from every build that I do. The Chrome that's applied to most of the the kits are way too brite for the smaller scales. I will leave the chrome for 1/12th and larger builds. To re-chrome....I shoot a Black or Blue High gloss base coats. Alclad II has Chrome that has a little learning curve. You can use Alclad polished Aluminum as it works good too. I also use ALSA Mirror Chrome which has a small learning curve but does not rub off when dry. If you want to leave the chrome and just touch up where it was cut from the sprue...then you can use a small paint brush( 3 0 or smaller) and a dab of Model Master Chrome Silver #FS 17178. Model Master has another chrome paint but it's not as good. I've used both and this one works the best between the two. Put a small amount of paint in a mixing pallet and add a drop or two of Lacquer thinner. Don't mix it in just let the thinner hit the edges of the paint and then load you brush and apply to the spot on the part. NOW...since MOLOTOW has come out with 3 paint pens and a refill bottle...all one has to do is just touch the part with it and it's rechromed. But...the small down side of it is..it takes at least 3-4 days for it to dry. It's is remarkable how well this paint looks when applied. If you can work with the dry time...then Molotow is the way to go. You can do a search on the web and watch a a few videos that's out there on it. Well Ron...I hope I've shed a little light on the chrome thing for you. Just remember there's no right or wrong..it's what ever works best for you. Gary
  6. 1 point
    Yeah, it was so streamlined that it hardly impeded the airflow. 😲 In a strong head wind, at max speed I think it could hover
  7. 1 point
    Great post. I've judged a few local shows and it surprises me how often the basic things go unnoticed by the builder. Finger prints, glue marks, seam lines, sprue gate marks, ejector pin marks, floating wheels. Also clean off the dust and cat hairs before you enter.🙄
  8. 1 point
    I tell you, I had a blast at the Nats this year!! I don't want to turn this into how many superlatives I can pour into one post, but if I did, they'd all be an understatement!!! (Sorry, couldn't help myself!!) Mike Moor's idea of pushing display models was brilliant, and the model count was staggering as a result. It is a model show after all, and he high quality on display certainly put our reason for being there out for all to see. I loved the venue, and Chattanooga is a wonderful city!! I managed to get over to the Towing and Recovery Museum and wasn't disappointed. Mike, you and your team did a great job, and I'll add my thanks to those who have already done so!! Hope you guys do it again in the future!! I'll be back!! Doug
  9. 1 point
    Greetings all, Just got back to San Antonio from Phoenix last night - 13+ hour drive, not too bad...and I-10 is a rather pleasant and easy drive. It also helps that the speed limit is 80 mph in some of the more remote locations. I first wish to thank Steve Collins and Team Phoenix for an absolutely outstanding National Convention. I had an absolute blast and I hope we can return to Phoenix someday in the near future for another convention. I wanted to take some time to put some facts out there about our bid that was approved by the E-Board and announced Saturday night. I have been reading and hearing a few things over the past few days and wanted to help with some clarification. The date and location of the 2020 convention will be 29 July - 1 Aug 2020 at the Embassy Suites and San Marcos Conference Center located in San Marcos, Texas. I, along with other members of the bid team, are members of Alamo Squadron in San Antonio; there is no chartered IPMS/USA club in San Marcos. During our research for a suitable hotel and conference center (Thanks to Dick Montgomery for his groundwork here) we found that San Antonio is just too expensive. As it turns out, San Marcos, just a short drive up I-35, is the right size and price for our needs and the city is hungry for our business. The Embassy Suites have been a pleasure to work with - I even received a supportive call from their corporate HQ in Atlanta on the Friday before the convention - and the San Marcos Convention and Visitors Bureau is in constant contact with me. I will be sharing the good news with them later today. The most important note I can make today is that the core leadership team for 2020 is comprised of more than just Alamo Squadron. We have several members of IPMS Houston on the team as well as IPMS Central Texas. Austin Scale Modeling Society members will also be joining the team soon. While it was nice to be recognized as Alamo Squadron in the bid results announcement Saturday night our team really is larger than just Alamo Squadron...we are Team Texas...and this is how I will be referring to us from here on out. Thank you to those of you that came up to me both before the location was announced and after expressing your support for the 2020 show...and especially those that said you would help out any way you could. This is very much appreciated. I will be checking the forum from time to time for questions about the 2020 convention but I want to emphasize that for the next year, Team Texas will be supporting Chattanooga in any way possible and will be on the ground in force next summer to help out. As is practice with other shows we will not put anything online until after next summer's show is complete. After Chattanooga 2019 I will "hang-out" here on the forums on a daily basis to help answer any questions that may pop-up. My initial thoughts are to have web site and hotel reservations up in September of 2019. Stay tuned and see you all in Chattanooga on 7 August 2019 with all of your "wrong" models. -Len Pilhofer
  10. 1 point
    Just finished my latest piece. This is a vinyl kit of the 1972 Gigan suit from "Godzilla On Monster Island" a.k.a. "Godzilla Vs Gigan". Kit stands about 12" tall and was finished using acrylics and artist inks. Base was scratch built. Thanks for looking!
  11. 1 point
    Very good news all round.
  12. 1 point
    Beautiful work so far. Keep it going man, it's great following another masterful build from you.
  13. 1 point
    Hey GIl - Thanks very much for your support - yeah - I think if I heat them a bit they might return to shape. But the halves will still be ratty looking....a lot of filler and supporting tabs under the joins will be needed. Frankly, I am so discouraged I probably will just build the stock kit. Couldn't believe the owner of Greymatter, what a pill. He actually emailed me repeatedly bragging that he was continuing to sell the parts, despite the negative ebay feedback.
  14. 1 point
    Thanks for the clarification. He'll have to finish another!
  15. 1 point
    Spring snow storm update! Yes it is spring and the middle of April but I think someone forgot to tell Mother Nature. Snowing like crazy here. So spent the day finishing the weapons bays and starting on the landing gear bays. The front landing gear bay is done. I added some wiring and hydraulic lines as well. I drew out the shape and laid out the wires then CA glued them together then fit them inside the bay. The photo etch supplied the wall details. I then glued the weapons and nose landing gear bay into the lower half of the fuselage. Next moving to the main gear then the engines. More photos at https://davidsscalemodels.com/build-log/1-48-f-22-raptor/
  16. 1 point
    Starting the Eduard 1/48 MIG-21 PFM. I will be using the decal scheme for the Polish Air Force. The scheme represents the aircraft as it appeared in 1996. The kit includes photo etch details so no extra accessories were added. To begin I started with the cockpit and the engine exhaust. For the interior color, Vallejo makes a Model Color (70.838) which is a match to the interior color used on the actual aircraft. The cockpit section also has the nose gear bay attached. I detailed the bay walls and assembled them. The dash was multiple layers of photo etch and looks great. The exhaust was detailed with photo etch and then weathered with pastel chalk to add a level of realism. The main landing gear bay was assembled and detailed. I added some 32 awg wire for details. I added some weight to the nose cone so the aircraft would not drag the tail once fully assembled. All of these sections needed to be built so that the fuselage can be built up. Assembling the fuselage was a little tricky for the area around the cockpit. I had to trim the sides of the cockpit floor by removing about 1mm from each side to get the fuselage to meet together. You can see all the build photos in my build log https://davidsscalemodels.com/build-log/1-48-mig-21-pfm/
  17. 1 point
    Mr. Willis: What you wrote, although a little more detailed and therefore longer than what our Survey working group would have prepared, is exactly the way we wanted the description of the 123 judging system to appear on the ballot- factual, unemotional, objective. Designed to inform, but not to persuade. Kudos to you! You must not have slept through those Civics classes that covered voting in an open honest system of government. At least somebody else gets it! Thank you. Regards, Nick
  18. 1 point
    Just spit-balling for fun here…based on my limited experience, the “Modeler’s Guide”, and previous responses to this thread, this is what I came up with as a brief “definition” of our 1-2-3 System: Current Form of Judging IPMS/USA National Contests (1-2-3) Model entries are evaluated based only on the entries in the categories of that year’s contest. They are compared only to each other, and judged irrespective of any perceived personal expertise of the entrant as the entrant is anonymous. The best model in the category on any given day is just that: of the models entered that day, this one is better than that one. Judges are IPMS members who volunteer their time. They follow the guidelines in our Modeler's Guide To IPMS Contests. According to that mandate, judges look at the whole model and determine how well the modeler did in bringing the whole project to completion, focusing first and foremost on “the basics”. While there will be class-specific (aircraft, armor, etc.) nuances, the overarching “basics” that will govern each class are construction, painting, and decaling. Judges only dig deeper when the basics do not allow for a clear-cut ranking. Judges are grouped in odd numbered teams to prevent a tie, and to provide balance when a judge may have a preference/bias. Currently, any judge can leave comments on any entrant’s model-entry sheet. Because the 1-2-3 system uses no “national standard” to compare all models, nor does it use a numeric system to present an unknown number of awards per category, inherently it defines the maximum number of awards to be purchased and presented. **Portions (if not all 😀) of my post are drawn from The IPMS/USA Modeler’s Guide To IPMS Contests, and previous responses in this thread. This is in no way meant to inflame, "one-up", or provide commentary on any other post in this thread. It is simply my stream-of-consciousness regarding this subject. Feel free to laud it, rip it to shreds, or print it out and use it as toilet paper.
  19. 1 point
    Nicely written tip! Thanks for the link! GIL
  20. 1 point
    This is an approx 1/3rd scale kit I obtained from Mark Warthling. It comes in 9 parts - the head/body, the stone arm, 2 sets of horns (long and short - I chose the short), a base and two name plates. The arm, base and one of the name plates are in translucent resin in case you want to light the kit. Once again it was a case of me jumping into things before taking the start image, but you'll see the clear resin along the way. I started with a tan primer, glued the horns in and then painted the face red. Reddened the face, and painted the hair black - When it came to the arm, I looked around and it was no where to be found. I contacted Mark, and for a little fee he was able to get me another. How can something that big go missing? I have no idea... Here you can see the translucent hand. Anyway, in the background you may be able to see I added a darker brown shadow to parts of the jacket. What I did to highlight the black hair was to use a little blue in it. All shirt references showed it was black, so I mixed a little blue into that to compliment the hair. You can also see the translucent base and the arm with primer. I also painted the zipper steel, and the little emblem on the pull the new Molotow Chrome. That stuff is amazing. Next was tackling the Dark brown leather collar and straps. You can see in the background the arm got it's coat of red - While I thought of it, I painted in the eyes. Hellboy had yellow sclera, with a light brown iris, and then the black pupil. With the squint the model has I just left of the sclera color... I fixed up the coloring on his head and now I'm happy with it. Hellboy is now complete. I didn't mention the base, but being translucent it calls out to be lit. Never having done lighting, I left it open for lights down the road. What I did tho, was dremel out more material in the symbols, and then seeing a miniatures trick I got some matte Mod Podge and mixed it with black craft paint until it was *dark*, then I painted thickly on (avoiding the symbols) the base. Does well with light blocking. It was crazy how many images I went thru before I found an definite image of the emblem on his sleeve. Only found one. Thanks for looking.
  21. 1 point
    LOL...great..I need to buy more paint Dave
  22. 1 point
    Very cool! It has that Japanese mythical look to it. Very well done. Bill
  23. 1 point
    Awesome. Love the base Dave
  24. 1 point
    Bingo! Between the contest rules and the Modeler's Guide to Competition (as Nick reminded us, it is the document formerly known as the Competition Handbook), most questions should be answered well in advance of any model show. Rules. Huh! What are they good for? Well, absolutely everything... They get updated at the National level annually (more or less), and most other IPMS-sanctioned contests base their rules on the Nationals rules, so you need to read them in advance of any contest. Ask questions. If the rules don't suit you--if you have some fundamental disagreement with them--you have the option not to play, or ask for some "Display Only" space. More and more shows offer it these days...you may still have to pay an entry fee, but you can still show your stuff. The information is readily available. As Brad Hamilton told Jeff Spicoli in the movie "Fast Times at Ridgemont High", "Learn it. Know it. Live it."
  25. 1 point
    I call my stash my hedge fund against inflation!
  26. 1 point
    Since y'all are brainstorming ways to publicize modelbuilding in general, the IPMS/USA in particular and encourage people to visit and hopefully join local model clubs, consider the following possibilities: 1. Add the URL of your model club's website as a line under your signature on all emails you send. 2 Do the same for the IPMS/USA 3. Anytime you post something on your Facebook page...if it makes sense...include a hotlink to your club's website or IIPMS/USA website. 4. Ditto for any other social sites you happen to be on. 5. Do you have a blog about anything? See if you can work modelbuilding into a post in some way, shape or form. 6. Here's a biggie. All of us...at least many of us...write articles of some kind or produce youtube videos. Those who do can work URLs of modelbuilding club websites and/or the IPMS/USA website into. 7. And finally, those of you who write print and/or E-books need to do what I am now doing. In the About The Author section, mention your IPMS number at the very least. When it comes to E-books...especially those that you self-publish...you have all the room in the world to promote the IPMS/USA, include links to your modelbuilding club and on an on. Hope some of this helps. Not every person will do all of these things I've mentioned...or even most of them. But pick the one that works best for you and then do it. Show those who don't know that modelbuilding can be a fantastic and enjoyable hobby at the very least. Even better, you can even make a living at some aspect of it if you really want it and are persistent enough.
  27. 1 point
    Thanks Kevin! That is about eight coats of white and nine of clear gloss! It's the closes thing I've ever come to getting a smooth coat of paint.
  28. 1 point
    Guys: THIS is why IPMSUSA gets the bad rap it does....rivet counters, color Nazis, and judges who are too intent on finding EVERY little flaw on an entry. I'm all for assessing basic alignments, but rarely see the need for any device to actually check it. It's very simple....if it looks out, it IS out, especially if and when confirmed by your fellow teammates. But, if I THINK it may be out, but it's very tough to tell and hard to see, then it's too small an error to concern myself with. It may or may not be a flaw, but if so, is a VERY minor one and in my mind NOT a difference maker! When we start zeroing in on such minutia we forget our job: judging CRAFTSMANSHIP! Which model displays that in the overall highest manner by comparison to those in its category? If you simply look for errors you lose the big picture. Just as any model can be more than the "sum of its parts"; it can also be more than the "sum of its flaws"! GIL
  29. 1 point
    Gil, Another possibility would be the different variants of a single type, though that could get out of hand with the F4 Phantom or F-111. One I'm currently planning takes three Monogram kits of a single type and building three variants. One more or less out of the box and the other two with most or all of the aftermarket bells and whistles.
  30. 1 point
    Here's a little bust I was doing while l waiting for the paint and/or glue of Medusa to dry. I took this sculpt of Det. Columbo as a sort of sketch, as it's a bit rough, so I just left it that way. The bust didn't come with a name, so remembering his famous line to solve the case - "Oh, one more thing..." So that's what I'll do when I create a proper base for it. I agonized over the 5 o'clock shadow - too much too little - and back again. It was the first time I did it with paint. (vs. pastels). The other hard part was, after all the time spent trying to make eyes centered, was to have his one eye accurate and a little off. The inspiration - All done . Thanks for looking. CCs welcome. (On the shelf with the other lil busts)
  31. 1 point
    The T-38 was no different. We always kept the canopy open as long a possible sitting at last chance and popped it open once we cleared the runway on landing. The summer sun was just brutal. I remember everyone coming back to the flight room soaked especially if they had a pattern only ride. We were issued three flight suits and there was always one in the wash. I recall hearing life support comment on having to change the backing pad on parachutes often. If the chute got wet, it could grow mold and that would mess up any ejection attempt.
  32. 1 point
    https://www.tested.com/art/makers/844438-show-and-tell-2001-eva-pod-model-kit/
  33. 1 point
    Thank you Peter @StrikeEagle, for your complimentive words. Glad you like the build log. ______________________________________ Now there was a matter of a partial house within the display boundaries. Assuming standard whole 'feet' measurements. I was able to get a good estimation of the house size. Decided to include interior lighting. Using an electronic ciruit which squences 5 outputs (LED lights). So, I divide the house into five rooms. Also added thin Perspex for windows. It was a bit tricky making the roof. Because the Masonite is 2.5 mm thick, I had to use wood putty to fill on the bevelled gaps. Included a painted figurine into the front enclosed verander. She is now overlooking the construction of the model Tested and created the sequencer circuit. Every 10 seconds one room light will turn off while an adjacent room switches on. This will appear as if someone is going from one room to the next.
  34. 1 point
    I used to play the various X-Wing and TIE fighter games. There were some pretty neat variants of the TIE fighter.
  35. 1 point
    Creepy work! it's great,
  36. 1 point
    Excellent. I love Saul's kits. I have them all except for the new one he announced for Jerseyfest Dave
  37. 1 point
    Ah, ha! Name now attached to face. Enjoyed judging with you.
  38. 1 point
    Wow quite the undertaking. The lighting/operating would have stopped me in my tracks. Outstanding work so far. It’s good you’re including a boat as to give people a visual for its size rather than just listing dimensions. I’ll be following this one. 😄
  39. 1 point
    Matthew Albanese: Modeler & Photographer Matthew Albanese’s fascination with film, special effects and movie magic—and the mechanics behind these illusions—began early. Born in northern New Jersey in 1983, Albanese spent a peripatetic childhood moving between New Jersey and upstate New York. An only child, Albanese enjoyed imaginative, solitary play. He loved miniatures and created scenarios intricately set with household objects and his extensive collection of action figures. After earning a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Photography at the State University of New York, Purchase, Albanese worked as a fashion photographer, training his lens on bags, designer shoes and accessories—this small-object specialization is known in the retail trade as “table top photography.” Albanese’s creative eye soon turned to tabletop sets of a more wildly eclectic nature. In 2008, a spilled canister of paprika inspired him to create his first mini Mars landscape. More minute dioramas—made of spices, food and found objects—followed. In 2011, Albanese was invited to show at the Museum of Art and Design of New York. His work has also been exhibited at the Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art, Winkleman Gallery, and Muba, Tourcoing France. Matthew is represented at Bonni Benrubi Gallery in New York. See his amazing work at https://www.matthewalbanese.com
  40. 1 point
    The Grand Junction Scale Modeller's Society has been around since the 1970s. At one time, there were 30-40 members in the club, but now we are down to about 10 or so. Even though most of our members are older, we still build numerous models. Once in a great while--when we can afford to--we hold a model show and contest. We get entries from all over the southwest US when we hold one, but a couple of years ago we lost our show venue (building) and have been searching for a new venue ever since. These two display cases (photos below) are our permanent exhibit at the Grand Junction (CO) VA Medical Center, one of the best VA hospitals in the VA system. The cases are both on the second floor of the hospital, in very prominent spots. The first cabinet has recently been updated with several new models of the Viet Nam and the Middle East eras, due to a request from VA management. The second display case contains car models built specifically for inclusion in the case. Our local veterans seem to really enjoy the displays, and we have received several positive comments on our models and themes from the vets and staff. Our donated M42 Duster (thanks to Mark Aldrich) is now on display in a prominent spot on "The Nam" shelf.
  41. 1 point
    Moving forward after some corrections the cockpit section is almost done. I scratch built the fire extinguisher and painted the cockpit section the correct color. I then started work on the crew area. The photo etch comes with the support cables for one side of the crew seats and I used 32 AWG wire to replicate the other side. The molded in seat belts were removed. I will make new seat belts out of cloth tape. I am working on making the turn buckles that go from the top of the seats to the supports. Need about 20 of them. Still have lots of details to add to the crew area. Build log at https://davidsscalemodels.com/build-log/1-48-mh-60k-blackhawk-soa/
  42. 1 point
    For what it's worth, my Scale Publications website has been completely redesigned for easier use. Check it out and see what you think. Opinions and comments welcome.
  43. 1 point
    Lookin' good so far. I like when the older kits take center stage rather than being at the back or the bottom of the stash pile. Looking forward to the next WIP installment. 🙂
  44. 1 point
    The Academy 1/48 F-4B is finished. Overall this kit is great. Very good fit and excellent decals. The instructions could use a little better clarity when it comes to missiles and bombs. So I now have four decades of VF-111 aircraft. All build and completed photos are at https://davidsscalemodels.com/2018/05/16/f-4b-phantom-from-vf-111-completed/
  45. 1 point
    Many aircraft have lights. On WWII aircraft they used a series of lights for night time recognition and many have various lights for formation flying at night. Many times these are represented on models as mold lines or molded in the plastic. I came up with a tutorial on how to make these more realistic using Acrylic Gel Medium and Tamiya clear paints. You can see the tutorial on my website at https://davidsscalemodels.com/tips-and-tricks/recognition-lights/ Here are some pictures to see how they look:
  46. 1 point
    After a few weeks of constant repairs, I finally got ahead of the broken parts and completed the Airfix USAAF resupply set. Since these are four individual vehicles, I'm posting them as individual models and counting them as such as well. Here they are.... First is my Cushman Model 39 Package Car: That Cushman is only about an inch long.... Next is my Chevrolet M-6 Bomb Service Truck: Here is the M-5 Bomb Trailer that the Chevrolet pulls: And finally here is the Autocar U-7144-T Tractor with F-1 Fuel Trailer: I didn't weather these much, given how they spent most of their time on paved runways and inside hangers. I am glad they are finally finished now. Next I'll be finishing up the RAF resupply set.... That's all for now. Thanks for looking in, comments are welcome.
  47. 1 point
    Years ago our Chapter had a building theme of "It Ain't My Type." We were supposed to build a model that was in an IPMS/USA Class where we would not ordinarily enter a model. Each member had to identify the Class(es) he did not like to build in, and then pick a kit and build it during the year. I do not know much about military vehicles, so I do not build tanks, field guns, railroad mortars, softskins, etc. I do like automotive subjects, however, and the nearest thing I could find to automotive in military vehicles was this truck kit. The kit represents a series of Firsts for me. This was my First true military vehicle. It was my First 1/35 scale kit. It was my First attempt at a three-color camo paint scheme. And it was NOT my First model to not be finished by the build deadline. Almost fully painted and detailed, it went back into the box and waited for me to tinker with it off and on for almost ten years. Last August, I was burned out on airplanes from the seven I built for The Magnificent 7's project, so I opened this box and decided to finish the assembly before beginning some new model. The camo scheme was the biggest challenge for me. The decal sheet had decals that spread across several color fields, and the lettering changed color in the middle of words, like "FLAMMABLE" for example. I tried to use the camo layout presented in the instructions, but the scheme did not match the provided decals. I had to draw a revised camo scheme onto the kit's pieces that was close to reference photos I had from the internet and also adjusted to accommodate the decals. Thank goodness there were reasonably close Model Master paints available for airbrush application. I actually liked this kit in spite of its flaws and complications. I have the Italeri sister kit of the Oshkosh M-977 Flatbed in my stash, but this one will get corrected resin wheels and tires and lots of Eduard photoetch details (which I have in the box). Some day I might even build it. Ed
  48. 1 point
    Well, that Tankograd book arrived today. Definitely get "Tankograd American Special #3022 - M60A2, M60A3 & AVLB" if you want to build the AVLB. It doesn't really help if you're going to build a A2 or A3 in my opinion. But then, who am I? ;-)
  49. 1 point
    This just came in. Believe it or not, I ordered this from Publisher's Clearinghouse: This looks like it'll be a fun one!
  50. 1 point
    Did you notice that the men working on the models dressed properly to go to work? White shirts, ties, and jackets even in a paint shop. :smiley14: Fast forward a century and reflect on how workers (or people in general) dress today. :o Ed
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