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Showing content with the highest reputation since 04/17/2017 in all areas

  1. 4 points
    My model is the Italeri 1/72 scale Fiat CR-32 Chirri." It represents an aircraft assigned to XXIII Grupo Caccia, Aviazione Legionaria. The unit was led by Lieutenant Colonel Andrea Zotti and based at Puig Moreno, Spain, June-July 1938. The unit formed part of the Italian contingent fighting for the Nationalist cause during the Spanish Civil War. I used the Osprey Fiat CR-32 Aces of the Spanish Civil War (Aircraft of the Aces 94) for inspiration; profile 28. I wanted to model Zotti's aircraft; he flew "3-4", but I only had the decals for "3-6". The model was built out-of-the-box except for the rigging. Took me 3-months to figure out I can't paint Italian camouflage with an airbrush freehand and another 3-months and a lot of Tamiya tape to manage that effort. I enjoyed the build; never worked harder to complete a model...
  2. 3 points
    http://culttvman.com/main/a-modelers-guide-to-painting-the-starship-enterprise-by-gary-kerr/ http://culttvman.com/main/a-modelers-guide-to-painting-the-starship-enterprise-pt2-by-gary-kerr/
  3. 2 points
  4. 2 points
    Two models completed in one year so far!! WooHoo!! 😁
  5. 2 points
    I think what's interesting is that the 1-2-3 description actually is written as a NEGATIVE towards GSB! Here are some examples: 1) " Entries aren’t compared to any “ideal”, “perfect-model”, or “national-standards” criteria". Strictly speaking that's true, but they make it sound like having a standard to WIN an award (NOT enter the contest) is a bad thing. Every club that does GSB KNOWS that to be false! And there IS a Standard in GSB... Those same BASICS! 2) "Judges are your IPMS peers"... Seems to imply that GSB uses wizards or outsiders from the GSB galaxy to judge at those shows. Nope! Turns out it's ALSO your "IPMS peers"! 3) " Recording results for just the 600 winners now requires 8 staff, transcribing scoring from just 200 sheets of paper" (etc)...Implies that GSB judging would be IMPOSSIBLE at the Nats because of the logistics of how 1-2-3 is done. FAILS to point out that EVERY GSB system used or proposed does NOT use that 1-2-3 system of recording. IF GSB were ever to be used at a Nats, the system would be entirely different. 4) " How many ‘extras’ of each award level should a host chapter plan to order, ‘just in case’? Just one per category (200 more)? Two or more per category? 2,350 awards – just in case?" This next paragraph rightly points out the differences between the number of awards needed between the two systems. However, it WRONGLY implies that you could NEVER know how much you need! This is dealt with by EVERY GSB show in the nation EVERY year; so it IS something you can "learn". Would GSB be a "higher cost" system? YES! But then THAT is the crux of the debate: Should IPMSUSA look to reward MORE deserving builds than they do now? And with the profits that are being made, IPMS CAN afford to by some more awards! The debate, and the PURPOSE of this survey is to try to determine if the general membership thinks that's a good idea or not. 5) " Our convention attendees want a ‘contest’ "; THAT is a BLATANT assumption, and actually not true! There's enough of a question about that to lead to this survey being done! It also implies that GSB attendees aren't looking to "win" (as opposed to "contest" attendees). Baloney! GSB contestants want to win as MUCH as they can; they just prefer to do so while NOT "beating" anyone else, and (when they do win) not limit anyone else's ability to win. 6) " How many ‘For Display Only’ entries do you ever see at any of our conventions?" What has THAT to do with models in a CONTEST, be it GSB or 1-2-3? People who want to compete enter the show, be it GSB or 1-2-3. Those who prefer to display do that, no matter what format is being used there! 7) " Want to be the one of the few entrants not even good enough to earn a Bronze award – ‘not up to national standards’? MISLEADINGLY implies that a Standard that determines WINNERS (not the ability to enter the show) is somehow mean. Well, how does it feel in a 1-2-3 show to go home EMPTY HANDED and not knowing if you even made the cut? BOTH systems still have "losers"...but GSB will have FEWER "losers" than 1-2-3! 8- " Our contest results and awards are a fair recognition of our entrants’ outstanding model-making accomplishments" BLATANT BALONEY! In ANY 1-2-3 category with 10-25 entries at the Nats there are 7-22 that go home with NO idea of how they did!! There are HUNDREDS of outstandingly built models that go COMPLETELY unrecognized because the judges decide that there are 3 there THAT day that are "better". The "fair recognition" is ONLY truly fair for the top 3 winners! There's a LOT of advantages for 1-2-3 in IPMSUSA, and the system has some positives that make it preferable to many. There was NO need to write the above in such a negative way. Instead of touting the positives and advantages 1-2-3 offers IPMS members, it's written to PUT DOWN GSB. As the IPMS USA Chief Judge, I could understand if Mr. Persechetti wrote an enthusiastic support for 1-2-3. However, he chose to write it as a condemnation, and actually showed his ignorance of GSB in doing so. I'm greatly disappointed and disgusted with his lack of character and honesty in this matter! Gil
  6. 2 points
    Alcohol! Two parts single malt scotch to 1 part water chilled to 17 degrees Fahrenheit.
  7. 2 points
    Dak, you make a valid point. However, I would suggest that it isn't limited to the IPMS/USA. The current "I'm Offended" culture that has developed in this country has to be a major factor. Keep in mind that practically anything that exists has the potential to offend anyone, but it has gotten completely out of control. Consider the efforts to make the Washington Redskins football team change their name because 'Redskins" is offensive to one small tribe. Other people are offended by the use of certain words, while others by actual historical events. Look at the complaints that started with objections to the Confederate Battle Flag...actually the Battle Flag of Northern Virginia...and expanded to statues of Confederate heros and schools that were named for men who had virtually no connection to the Confederacy other than fighting for the South. Political views are now subject to similar bias. Liberal viewpoints are widely publicized, while those of a conservative bent are castigated or banned. I was unable to market an article to a magazine I wrote for because the model in question....a Peterbilt 377 with an American Bald Eagle w/crossed American & Confederate flags on the air dam....was refused because "it might offend someone". If I did that model today as an ebook, I would be forced to apologize for it, accused of being a racist and required to remove the ebook from the marketplace. And if you want to get an idea of just how hypersensitive people are getting...as well as ignorant...I very recently had a magazine article corrected by my editor because "I've never heard of it, so I'm sure no one else has ever heard of it!" What was it? Believe it or not, a Mexican Jumping Bean. Instead, the editor changed Mexican Jumping Bean to simply 'jumping bean", thereby identifying every bean on the planet as a jumping bean! And if you think all of the above is a recent development, it's just the extreme result. Tony Weddel, a deceased aviation artist and my friend, quit doing heavy combat aviation art back in the late '70s or early '80s because he could no longer sell the art or prints. Why? Because people didn't want to purchase art that depicted violence. Result? He wound up doing pretty paintings of aircraft against storm clouds or toned down combat...unless a client specifically requested heavy combat. That, by the way, leads to your comment about viewing scenes of violence in model dioramas. Incidentally, it's also the reason why I've never created a crucifixion diorama of my own....it would offend virtually everyone who saw it. I have no idea where this is going to end, but if you build models, dioramas, articles and/or books for a living, it's already having an impact on what you can produce without offending someone. And it doesn't matter if it's a group or a single person. Dak, in case you're wondering, I'm 76 and I have no more problem viewing real life scenes than you do. I knew a preacher who I offered a copy of my P-38 CD-ROM to, warning him that it had a lot of nose art images containing pinup or semi-nude figures. His response? It's history. It'll be interesting to see what kinds of responses I get to this little tirade. Richard
  8. 2 points
    Anyway, here is my last acquisition I got last year as a Christmas gift to myself. I didn't post it above because for some reason the camera could not focus on the box and all my pics were blurry. This time, after considerable effort; I have a pic to show: I had wanted that since it came out. I figured it was time since I had Christmas money to burn. I hope to get started on it this year.
  9. 2 points
    Rusty says it best and I wish I could instill that attitude in all my model buddies. While I go to contests and enter models I no longer worry or care about not winning. I still chat and discuss when something wins that I feel shouldn't have (as all modelers tend to do). My theory or mentality is that if I win I was fortunate enough that 3 fellow model builders (hopefully) thought my entry was better than the others presented on that day and time. If I don't win.....Guess what? I will still build models to the best of my ability and will still enter contests until I can no longer build.
  10. 2 points
    Hey Ron...First off...I think you'll enjoy build scale cars, if you like 1/1 cars. OK..to try and answer your questions... Personally... I strip all the chrome(using concentrated laundry bleach...Clorox is what I use) from every build that I do. The Chrome that's applied to most of the the kits are way too brite for the smaller scales. I will leave the chrome for 1/12th and larger builds. To re-chrome....I shoot a Black or Blue High gloss base coats. Alclad II has Chrome that has a little learning curve. You can use Alclad polished Aluminum as it works good too. I also use ALSA Mirror Chrome which has a small learning curve but does not rub off when dry. If you want to leave the chrome and just touch up where it was cut from the sprue...then you can use a small paint brush( 3 0 or smaller) and a dab of Model Master Chrome Silver #FS 17178. Model Master has another chrome paint but it's not as good. I've used both and this one works the best between the two. Put a small amount of paint in a mixing pallet and add a drop or two of Lacquer thinner. Don't mix it in just let the thinner hit the edges of the paint and then load you brush and apply to the spot on the part. NOW...since MOLOTOW has come out with 3 paint pens and a refill bottle...all one has to do is just touch the part with it and it's rechromed. But...the small down side of it is..it takes at least 3-4 days for it to dry. It's is remarkable how well this paint looks when applied. If you can work with the dry time...then Molotow is the way to go. You can do a search on the web and watch a a few videos that's out there on it. Well Ron...I hope I've shed a little light on the chrome thing for you. Just remember there's no right or wrong..it's what ever works best for you. Gary
  11. 1 point
    I tell you, I had a blast at the Nats this year!! I don't want to turn this into how many superlatives I can pour into one post, but if I did, they'd all be an understatement!!! (Sorry, couldn't help myself!!) Mike Moor's idea of pushing display models was brilliant, and the model count was staggering as a result. It is a model show after all, and he high quality on display certainly put our reason for being there out for all to see. I loved the venue, and Chattanooga is a wonderful city!! I managed to get over to the Towing and Recovery Museum and wasn't disappointed. Mike, you and your team did a great job, and I'll add my thanks to those who have already done so!! Hope you guys do it again in the future!! I'll be back!! Doug
  12. 1 point
    Simply outstanding work. Congrats. Regards Christopher
  13. 1 point
    Well, here it is more than a month later and I finally had time to actually work on something; thanks to Hobby Day Weekend. Here's my latest. I tried getting further along on several models, starting with the Russian glider. I managed to get it sanded down now, eliminating a lot of seams and issues: I got the wings and wheels on this bird now: Later I added more Mr. Surfacer to the wing roots and sanded it down. This bird is ready for paint now. After that, I decided to get caught up on some armor. The MAN Pershing tractor-trailer was advanced a bit when I got the missile cradle done on the trailer: The missile is removable for painting. I also completed all the assembly on the tractor. This is now ready for paint: This is looking good so far: Now I wanted to advance my BMP-3 Early a little more. I finished up the wheels, sprockets and tracks as well as the interior: Then I completed most of the upper hull and snapped it down on top, then added the turret to see how it looks: Almost there... After this, I decided the M-1114 Humvee languished long enough. I pushed ahead on this one, finishing the main body and part of the roof: After dry fitting the roof, I saw where other issues were going to happen: Yeah, that's back on the box for now... Moving on, I got the wheels and sprockets on the Nagmachon in preparation for the tracks: Afterward, I added the doghouse after installing the armored glass to it. I also 'primered' the wheels in preparation for the vinyl tracks as recommended so the vinyl doesn't melt the wheels: After this is gonna be a bunch of photo-etch and then some paint, some weathering, and then more photo-etch screens all over this. Fun times ahead! For a little break, I decided to work more on my 1/24 scale Coke truck. First, I had some ejector pin marks to fill: I don't know how much of that will be able to be seen, but I still want it looking good enough. Later I added the fenders to the main floor of this truck. The hood piece is only dry-fit to this: Time to wait on that again.... After this, I wanted something simple, easy and fun. So, remember that Bobcat kit of the airfield support vehicles I got? I pulled that out and got the vehicles all built. They are snap together so I can disassemble them as needed to paint details. For now though, I just played! Here's the Fire Truck: Later I realized that the hose nozzle was not attached to the roof so I drilled the hole and added it. Here's the Fuel truck: Yes, there is glass for the windows; I just left it off for painting purposes. Here are the two together, you can see the nozzle on the roof of the fire truck now: After that was the baggage handling tractor and trailer with the generator trailer: Here's the full set all together: BTW, there's figures with this set too.... After all this, I decided it was time to move on and get my church built. Remember the cross I bought for this? Well, I decided to cement it directly to the original tiny cross so I could use the support for the new cross: Now this will fit well on the church: And it does look good! I like this very much: Later on I painted all the white trim around the windows, doors and ledges: Later I'll get the cornerstones and then try to figure out how to do the stone walls and roof. Well, that completes this small update. Maybe I'll be able to get more done later, but I'm thinking it might be another month! Regardless, enjoy the tour and thanks for looking in!
  14. 1 point
    Beautiful work so far. Keep it going man, it's great following another masterful build from you.
  15. 1 point
    Here's a tiny resin kit from TD Cast. This was a 2015 Wonder Festival exclusive. Included a couple w.I.p. pics this time around. Once again hand finished in acrylics and artist inks with a scratch built base. Thanks for looking!
  16. 1 point
    I recently scored a kit with an MSRP of $169.99 for under $15 delivered. Guys from my model club in Louisville posted about some deep discounts on Dragon kits at Dragon USA. While the kit they were discussing was a 1/6th scale Panzer II normally $350 for $16 and discounted to $10 after using their Father's Day code, I searched other mistakenly discounted kits. I found the Dragon Iron Man Age of Ultron Mark XLIII kit listed for $10 and change; $7.18 after the 35% off discount code. With shipping, a whopping $14.82 delivered. Others tried to order the giant tank and one guy tried to order Iron Man, but their orders were cancelled. By the time they posted their orders were cancelled, I got a shipping notice. It arrived a two days later. By the time it arrived, the price had risen to $101.99. http://www.dragonusaonline.com/item_detail.aspx?ItemCode=DRA38155
  17. 1 point
  18. 1 point
    Hello guys These are the things I've been working on lately, as my hands shake more and more with the passing of the years I'm dedicating more time to the 3d designing and some less to the "real" plastic things. Anyway these designs are later 3d printed so I can see them built and painted in the finished models. I hope you like them.
  19. 1 point
    A few weeks ago, this appeared in my inbox, and I thought about responding then; but then more serious priorities came up and I was unable to follow up on what I had wanted to say. That said, IPMS uses an unweighted system that is frequently unworkable at the local level. National judging criteria has been online forever; but my experiences been that nobody actually ever reads the national rules, and put them into practice. I have been a member of IPMS since February 1967, I have been to a lot of contests; I have judged many of them, including a Nationals a decade or so ago. As president of the Sacramento IPMS Silverwings Chapter for 10 years, I have done my share of running contests. I have also taken home my share of awards over the years. IPMS is one of the few competitive organizations that I am aware of that absolutely refuses to use some form of numerical standard for evaluation of competitor performance. Think of it, everybody else uses a point system to evaluate performance in various categories of competition, whether as professional sports, Olympic competition, such as figure skating, or whatever, they all use a point system. We do not. We use a system that is inherently arbitrary, inefficient, inconsistent, and mostly focuses on inconsequentials. Go to any collection of models in a contest, and it is an absolute guarantee that 95 percent of them will have obvious flaws, whether it is in alignments, sloppy painting, flawed construction technique; you name it. In many contests, models of differing scales are lumped together for no other reason that the number of entrants in any standard scale are likely to be insufficient to generate effective competition. All biplanes together; all airliners together, sci-fi, automobiles; whatever. Actual accomplishment is rarely considered. I would be the first to agree that modelers often attempt projects for which they all too often have insufficient skill, commitment, or patience to do the job properly. On the other hand, there are modeling venues, especially among older modelers, where some models might take years to complete, such as model shipbuilding, where built up hulls are laboriously constructed from hand cut frames; plank-on-frame exterior, rigging, and all the other features and accouterments of old-time men-'o-war take years of study and practice to do the job properly. Needless to say, we do not see much of that in our contests. In the contest itself, getting people to judge can be like pulling teeth. I can remember occasions where I personally judged nine categories of models in a single afternoon, often with one another judge. That makes for a long afternoon. It also makes it tough to get the awards announced, and getting people on their way back home before late afternoon. And Sacramento has long had the reputation of running the better-attended contests in Northern California. This next month, we will be hosting a judging clinic at our monthly meetings in order to get potential judges primed and ready to go, both at our contest, and elsewhere in our area. This is long overdue. If I could put one finger on where things go wrong, it would be that judges get hyper-focused on one aspect of model judging, typically looking for flaws rather than looking for quality of work. And by quality work, I am talking about balance. I have seen judges looking inside jet air intakes looking for scratch marks that no one can see without a penlight, looking way in the back, just to be able to find something on which to hang his hat in order to make a decision. At the same time, sloppy detailing in paintwork and decaling often go unnoticed. Environmental effects such as weathering are overdone or are inappropriate to the era and circumstances that the model is supposed to represent (paint chipping on a sea-borne, carrier-based aircraft? Really?) That is absurd! And it is also unfair. I see three or four so-called 'experts' hyper focused on trying to decide which is Number One, and which will be Number Two, when there are still several other categories of models that need to be judged, and judged efficiently. There are ways to do that, and do it efficiently; but it does require the judging cadre to be able to separate out the important from the accidental or inconsequential. Regrettably, this penchant for 'finding the flaw' has been baked into their consciousness to the extent that they cannot imagine any other consideration. At the same time, the meter is running, and people are getting impatient to pack up and go home! At the national level, we do have judges who know what they are doing; at the local level, not so much. After doing this stuff for more than 50 years, I have come to the conclusion that things will not get any better, because the untrained new guys are taught to ignore the bigger picture of what the model actually represents, and instead, they are told to get down into the weeds and add up the perceived mistakes and flaws in execution. Pretty sad, when you come to think of it. And that is one of the reasons why it is so hard to get people to judge contests. That may also be the reason why over the past decade or so, model contests have become progressively fewer in number, and have fewer attendees. Those modelers who attend contests tend to be older. Model making as a pastime tends to attract older men generally nowadays, even as the quality of model kits has never been better. But, with better and more detailed kits now available, expectations have also risen over what modelers expect of themselves by way of accomplishment. Nitpicking and flies pecking is not the way to grow the hobby. Whether the Gold-Silver-Bronze is a better one from the one that we have now I could not say for sure; but the one thing I can be sure of is that the existing system is not worth a damn, not the way it is being done now! At least with the GSB system, there is the hope and expectation that quality standards would predominate, or at least get a fair hearing. I do not see that happening with the existing IPMS system. Art Silen IPMS No. 1708
  20. 1 point
    Beautiful aircraft Ora! You did an exceptional job on it. Well done!
  21. 1 point
    I agree, exceptional article! That was fun to read!
  22. 1 point
    Gil, I chose to do a more subdued scheme.
  23. 1 point
    Hi Joe Rule I.3 states (emphasis is mine): "Prior Winners. Models that have won First-, Second-, or Third-place, or Outof-the-Box awards in any category of any previous IPMS/USA National Model Contest may not be entered in any subsequent IPMS/USA National Model Contest for awards, except as provided in Section II, Rule 19 (last sentence) and Section III, Rules 5--7. Previous award winners can be used as noted in Dioramas, Collections, Triathlon and Group entries. Models that have won an award as part of a Collection, Triathlon or Group entry may also be entered individually in subsequent National Contests. However, models that have won individually, and as part of a Collection, Triathlon or Group entry, are not eligible for subsequent National Contests." Note that there is no exception for Juniors moving up to Standard categories in subsequent years. There is the qualifier in Rule I.2 that a Junior entrant may choose to enter any or all of his entries [for that year] in the Standard categories. Your son's model, and I am assuming we are talking about his excellent Perry frigate from the Omaha show, may be entered for an award as part of a diorama/vignette (II.19) or as part of a Trathalon, Collection, or Group Entry (III.5-7). It may also be shown as a Display Only entry. I hope this answers your question. Ed Grune NCC Head Ship Judge
  24. 1 point
    Gil, I love the old Dave Deal designs! Never built them though. As a kid, I did do a lot of Weirdo's though. We really had a lot of strange stuff when I was growing up. Do you remember the old Flap Jack model. I still have one new in the box. I really need to get around to building that one of these days.
  25. 1 point
    Well, I have about 400 models in my stash, but I have about five or six models on the Shelf of Woe, or Doom if you will. I do need to get more of them done. I'm tired of them taking up space in the workbench and hobby room.
  26. 1 point
    One of your best works! Great capture of Ross. In all his shows I never saw him get a drop of paint on his shirt, would have been nice to see one on your figure>
  27. 1 point
    Don't really remember this guy, but nice job on the paint up.
  28. 1 point
    I call my stash my hedge fund against inflation!
  29. 1 point
    Since y'all are brainstorming ways to publicize modelbuilding in general, the IPMS/USA in particular and encourage people to visit and hopefully join local model clubs, consider the following possibilities: 1. Add the URL of your model club's website as a line under your signature on all emails you send. 2 Do the same for the IPMS/USA 3. Anytime you post something on your Facebook page...if it makes sense...include a hotlink to your club's website or IIPMS/USA website. 4. Ditto for any other social sites you happen to be on. 5. Do you have a blog about anything? See if you can work modelbuilding into a post in some way, shape or form. 6. Here's a biggie. All of us...at least many of us...write articles of some kind or produce youtube videos. Those who do can work URLs of modelbuilding club websites and/or the IPMS/USA website into. 7. And finally, those of you who write print and/or E-books need to do what I am now doing. In the About The Author section, mention your IPMS number at the very least. When it comes to E-books...especially those that you self-publish...you have all the room in the world to promote the IPMS/USA, include links to your modelbuilding club and on an on. Hope some of this helps. Not every person will do all of these things I've mentioned...or even most of them. But pick the one that works best for you and then do it. Show those who don't know that modelbuilding can be a fantastic and enjoyable hobby at the very least. Even better, you can even make a living at some aspect of it if you really want it and are persistent enough.
  30. 1 point
    You're killing me Smalls! I'll see what I can do, but with the volume I put out, it will be tough slowing down to get additional figures painted.
  31. 1 point
    Great work and idea Kev! Definitely a change of pace from real space modeling. Have fun modeling Mike
  32. 1 point
    We have three more coming up in November and one in December. The big hindrance to seeing the launches is the on shore flow in the evening and the decreased visibility especially this time of year. Sunny SoCal only happened when Sonny Bono was mayor of Carmel!😄
  33. 1 point
    Way to go, Kevin! I admire your technique for skin tones; very realistic. The colorful slithering things just continue to add interest to the piece. Ed
  34. 1 point
    Here's a little bust I was doing while l waiting for the paint and/or glue of Medusa to dry. I took this sculpt of Det. Columbo as a sort of sketch, as it's a bit rough, so I just left it that way. The bust didn't come with a name, so remembering his famous line to solve the case - "Oh, one more thing..." So that's what I'll do when I create a proper base for it. I agonized over the 5 o'clock shadow - too much too little - and back again. It was the first time I did it with paint. (vs. pastels). The other hard part was, after all the time spent trying to make eyes centered, was to have his one eye accurate and a little off. The inspiration - All done . Thanks for looking. CCs welcome. (On the shelf with the other lil busts)
  35. 1 point
    A bit more progress. Fuselage is painted. I still need to add some gloss to the finish. Wings are painted and test fit. Also started working on the engine. I was originally going to build this straight out of the box but even though I'm no expert on aircraft details I felt that some of the details were a bit soft so I decided to access some research and add some extra details. The cleanup on the engine was a labor as a lot of seam lines are in all of the worst places. I also decided to replace the exhaust pieces with styrene tubing as the kit pieces were going to be next to impossible to drill out the ends. Lots of paint details as well as there are so many different colors on the engine. So far I'm happy with the progress.
  36. 1 point
    Have to give a BIG shout out and thank you to all the volunteer photographers that made this years photo coverage happen! William Dedig, Phil Peterson, Chris Nicoll, Rick Jackson, and Randall Cox. Thank you all so much!
  37. 1 point
    Ah, ha! Name now attached to face. Enjoyed judging with you.
  38. 1 point
    Wow quite the undertaking. The lighting/operating would have stopped me in my tracks. Outstanding work so far. It’s good you’re including a boat as to give people a visual for its size rather than just listing dimensions. I’ll be following this one. 😄
  39. 1 point
    Using CA glue. I use the glue looper to apply the glue. It is a very nice tool and applies an accurate amount of glue. http://www.creativedynamicllc.com/the-glue-looper.html
  40. 1 point
    The Grand Junction Scale Modeller's Society has been around since the 1970s. At one time, there were 30-40 members in the club, but now we are down to about 10 or so. Even though most of our members are older, we still build numerous models. Once in a great while--when we can afford to--we hold a model show and contest. We get entries from all over the southwest US when we hold one, but a couple of years ago we lost our show venue (building) and have been searching for a new venue ever since. These two display cases (photos below) are our permanent exhibit at the Grand Junction (CO) VA Medical Center, one of the best VA hospitals in the VA system. The cases are both on the second floor of the hospital, in very prominent spots. The first cabinet has recently been updated with several new models of the Viet Nam and the Middle East eras, due to a request from VA management. The second display case contains car models built specifically for inclusion in the case. Our local veterans seem to really enjoy the displays, and we have received several positive comments on our models and themes from the vets and staff. Our donated M42 Duster (thanks to Mark Aldrich) is now on display in a prominent spot on "The Nam" shelf.
  41. 1 point
    Moving forward after some corrections the cockpit section is almost done. I scratch built the fire extinguisher and painted the cockpit section the correct color. I then started work on the crew area. The photo etch comes with the support cables for one side of the crew seats and I used 32 AWG wire to replicate the other side. The molded in seat belts were removed. I will make new seat belts out of cloth tape. I am working on making the turn buckles that go from the top of the seats to the supports. Need about 20 of them. Still have lots of details to add to the crew area. Build log at https://davidsscalemodels.com/build-log/1-48-mh-60k-blackhawk-soa/
  42. 1 point
    For what it's worth, my Scale Publications website has been completely redesigned for easier use. Check it out and see what you think. Opinions and comments welcome.
  43. 1 point
    Detailed info on Southwest's colors and logos can be found in Southwest's Brand Style Guide, a 184-page PDF which can be downloaded here: https://swa.adcompliance.com/SWA_Docs/Brand_Style_Guide.pdf
  44. 1 point
    They are part of the Eduard photo-etch set. The set has detail parts for the cockpit, landing gear bays, external panels, and flaps.
  45. 1 point
    The work continues on the interior of the J2F duck. The interior and landing gear are basically installed. Have many more details to add. I drilled out the exhaust pipes to look more realistic. I did watch “Murphy’s War” last night while working on it. Grabbed some screen shots for details of the engine area. Many scenes of the engine without the cowl provided some nice references. All the build photos can be seen at https://davidsscalemodels.com/build-log/1-48-j2f-duck/
  46. 1 point
    The Academy 1/48 F-4B is finished. Overall this kit is great. Very good fit and excellent decals. The instructions could use a little better clarity when it comes to missiles and bombs. So I now have four decades of VF-111 aircraft. All build and completed photos are at https://davidsscalemodels.com/2018/05/16/f-4b-phantom-from-vf-111-completed/
  47. 1 point
    Thanks Kev. You reminded me to post final images: Additional images can be found here: Super Jerry F.2
  48. 1 point
    The base coat painting is done. I also painted the missiles and drop tanks. I used black, brown, and blue pastel chalk to weather the exhaust. They came out very similar to the reference photo's I am using. Should be starting the numerous decals tomorrow. More photo's on my blog under the build logs page.
  49. 1 point
    Many aircraft have lights. On WWII aircraft they used a series of lights for night time recognition and many have various lights for formation flying at night. Many times these are represented on models as mold lines or molded in the plastic. I came up with a tutorial on how to make these more realistic using Acrylic Gel Medium and Tamiya clear paints. You can see the tutorial on my website at https://davidsscalemodels.com/tips-and-tricks/recognition-lights/ Here are some pictures to see how they look:
  50. 1 point
    Last Sunday I was at the Pasadena Valleycon and was able to win the following raffle prizes: One of the last prizes available near the end of the raffle so I grabbed it: Since George had model railroading going on, he added some railroad accessories to the raffle: Now I have enough buildings to build a small town! LOL! I spent the rest of my birthday money in the vendor room but was only able to buy these two models: Now that I have that second Death Dealer, I can start building that one and preserve my San Diego Comicon exclusive! The next day, I found this package in my mailbox from James: Thanks James! Now to figure out what version to do. Man, I want two more now! LOL! Finally, my AMPS club met at Brookhurst Hobbies where I got to use my Brookhurst Hobbies Gift Card to help purchase this: Well, that's it for now. I'll be busy for awhile just working on some of these. I did start some of them; you'll see them in the "Maddog Manufacturing" Thread. Okay, now back to the bench.....
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