Jump to content

Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/15/2018 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    I just got my first box of True North paint in. Haven't used it yet and know nothing about it beyond their website and a couple of telephone conversations with the company president. I'll let you know what I think about it as I start using it. About all I can tell you right now is that I'll be using it in my next Modelbuilding Guide ebook, I opened a couple of bottles and I like what I see, definitely thick enough to hand brush nicely, still thin enough to airbrush without being prethinned AND it isn't an acrylic. Oh, yeah, one more thing. The FS numbers are on the back of the label in font that's large enough to actually read. Odd place, you say? Well, it beats having it squeezed down to the point you need an Optivisor in order to read it on the front of the label.
  2. 2 points
    Here are some more photos of the build. The model was pretty easy to paint; overall MM Acryl Army Helo Green (FS 34031) on the outside and on the inside I used Tamiya NATO Black. Other shades were also used to break up the overall colors. The inside of the engine area was MM Yellow Zinc Chromate with a mist coat of fluorescent green from the square bottle in the transmission area. Adding the Zactomodels exterior set really helped the kit also. So, here they are... I used Lite Bright pegs for the screens on the IP. I wired up the Disco Ball and the tail area. On the rotor, I placed dots of red, blue, green and yellow with a toothpick for the maintenance indicators. I also made umbilicals from the fuselage to the weapon stations. After everything was together I gave it a dry brushing with Tamiya weathering powders.
  3. 2 points
    Dang Nick....learn the difference between a VALID question and a complaint.....All of us know how well our volunteers do. Gil
  4. 2 points
    I thought long before writing what I am about to write, but finally decided that I would do so even if I take flak for it, or risk crossing a line. I do not understand why this question was started here on the IPMS/USA website, or what it has to do with GENERAL MODELLING, All About Building Models. How does asking this question relate to building models? We are not supposed to bring politics into discussions on this site, but that is where this thread appears to be headed where people state their personal biases on what they do, or do not build and then make comparisons to current politics as justification. I do not believe that anyone has deliberately tried to be insulting, but I have read comments that I believe are biased and if I were thinned skinned could cause insult, and for that, and the above reason, I do not think that these types of discussions belong here on a modelling site such as this one. I feel that this discussion should be shut down before it goes any further, if for no other reason that it has nothing to do with modelling. Thanks for reading, John
  5. 2 points
    1/48 Accurate Miniatures Wright Patterson AFB P-51 NA prototype 1/48 Ta 1831/48 prewar Tamiya Zeke
  6. 2 points
    Dak, you make a valid point. However, I would suggest that it isn't limited to the IPMS/USA. The current "I'm Offended" culture that has developed in this country has to be a major factor. Keep in mind that practically anything that exists has the potential to offend anyone, but it has gotten completely out of control. Consider the efforts to make the Washington Redskins football team change their name because 'Redskins" is offensive to one small tribe. Other people are offended by the use of certain words, while others by actual historical events. Look at the complaints that started with objections to the Confederate Battle Flag...actually the Battle Flag of Northern Virginia...and expanded to statues of Confederate heros and schools that were named for men who had virtually no connection to the Confederacy other than fighting for the South. Political views are now subject to similar bias. Liberal viewpoints are widely publicized, while those of a conservative bent are castigated or banned. I was unable to market an article to a magazine I wrote for because the model in question....a Peterbilt 377 with an American Bald Eagle w/crossed American & Confederate flags on the air dam....was refused because "it might offend someone". If I did that model today as an ebook, I would be forced to apologize for it, accused of being a racist and required to remove the ebook from the marketplace. And if you want to get an idea of just how hypersensitive people are getting...as well as ignorant...I very recently had a magazine article corrected by my editor because "I've never heard of it, so I'm sure no one else has ever heard of it!" What was it? Believe it or not, a Mexican Jumping Bean. Instead, the editor changed Mexican Jumping Bean to simply 'jumping bean", thereby identifying every bean on the planet as a jumping bean! And if you think all of the above is a recent development, it's just the extreme result. Tony Weddel, a deceased aviation artist and my friend, quit doing heavy combat aviation art back in the late '70s or early '80s because he could no longer sell the art or prints. Why? Because people didn't want to purchase art that depicted violence. Result? He wound up doing pretty paintings of aircraft against storm clouds or toned down combat...unless a client specifically requested heavy combat. That, by the way, leads to your comment about viewing scenes of violence in model dioramas. Incidentally, it's also the reason why I've never created a crucifixion diorama of my own....it would offend virtually everyone who saw it. I have no idea where this is going to end, but if you build models, dioramas, articles and/or books for a living, it's already having an impact on what you can produce without offending someone. And it doesn't matter if it's a group or a single person. Dak, in case you're wondering, I'm 76 and I have no more problem viewing real life scenes than you do. I knew a preacher who I offered a copy of my P-38 CD-ROM to, warning him that it had a lot of nose art images containing pinup or semi-nude figures. His response? It's history. It'll be interesting to see what kinds of responses I get to this little tirade. Richard
  7. 2 points
    Anyway, here is my last acquisition I got last year as a Christmas gift to myself. I didn't post it above because for some reason the camera could not focus on the box and all my pics were blurry. This time, after considerable effort; I have a pic to show: I had wanted that since it came out. I figured it was time since I had Christmas money to burn. I hope to get started on it this year.
  8. 1 point
  9. 1 point
    With the table cleared it was time to dive into the pile again for some new kits to work on. This time I pulled out two, both from Gillman Productions. The first is Pepper from the series American Horror Story, and the Freakshow story. We find the kit is similar to Twisty from the same show with a sort of carnival base. The kit comes in only 3 parts - the head, bust, and base. Every so often you'll get a cool illustration from Mark Van Tine, the sculptor! Base colors added. except for the ice cream (at the time I was still researching that). ;) (EDIT: chocolate, strawberry, and vanilla) ;) First highlight added, and epoxied the bust to the base. Starting with the face this session, I gave the usual black eyes to start and also some Beige Red for a base to the skin. Some Reikland Fleshshade was added as the shadows and then some more speckled around the face. Then some Beige Red was speckled on top. A mix of that paint with some of Vs Basic Skin tone followed, and then a final of just the Basic Skin tone. Having a look the actress' blue eyes were left and I used Azure for the base color of the irises. With that I was done. Thanks for looking.
  10. 1 point
    He does have a point though....going on 3 months after the Chattanooga show and it's still on the main page where the 2020 show should be by now....Sure there's plenty of time, but it does beg the question, especially if their website is up and running. GIL
  11. 1 point
    This is simply not true in IPMS judging. While we may give the builder the benefit of the doubt, we do judge gross accuracy and often in the specific. GENERALLY SPEAKING....While an airplane with a crooked part may not be "good craftsmanship", it is also not "accurate". Tanks with floating tracks are not accurate, but it is also considered poor craftmanship. We may not judge specifics like the location of a unit marking or the shade of color, but we do judge accuracy. If not, then why put so much time into the effort? We could just pick the ones we think are pretty. Generally speaking, heavy rubble with a neatly cleared path for a tank's tracks shows a lack of consistency, which is a consideration in judging. Many times I have seen vehicles put into locations where it would be impossible to get into...or out of.... without a helicopter. This is poor craftsmanship and shows a lack of consistency. Dak
  12. 1 point
    Solstice- one of two times in the year when the sun reaches its lowest (winter) and highest ( summer) point in the noon sky. Solace- support, consolation, etc. Just sayin,’ Nick
  13. 1 point
    Yeah, it was so streamlined that it hardly impeded the airflow. 😲 In a strong head wind, at max speed I think it could hover
  14. 1 point
    Great post. I've judged a few local shows and it surprises me how often the basic things go unnoticed by the builder. Finger prints, glue marks, seam lines, sprue gate marks, ejector pin marks, floating wheels. Also clean off the dust and cat hairs before you enter.🙄
  15. 1 point
    I tell you, I had a blast at the Nats this year!! I don't want to turn this into how many superlatives I can pour into one post, but if I did, they'd all be an understatement!!! (Sorry, couldn't help myself!!) Mike Moor's idea of pushing display models was brilliant, and the model count was staggering as a result. It is a model show after all, and he high quality on display certainly put our reason for being there out for all to see. I loved the venue, and Chattanooga is a wonderful city!! I managed to get over to the Towing and Recovery Museum and wasn't disappointed. Mike, you and your team did a great job, and I'll add my thanks to those who have already done so!! Hope you guys do it again in the future!! I'll be back!! Doug
  16. 1 point
    Just finished my latest piece. This is a vinyl kit of the 1972 Gigan suit from "Godzilla On Monster Island" a.k.a. "Godzilla Vs Gigan". Kit stands about 12" tall and was finished using acrylics and artist inks. Base was scratch built. Thanks for looking!
  17. 1 point
    Very good news all round.
  18. 1 point
    Simply outstanding work. Congrats. Regards Christopher
  19. 1 point
    After reading the last few comments, I have changed my thinking on using a point system and judging for an open judging system. It would seem that a team of judges (as we have now) should make the "cut" (as we do now) and judge each model to determine what medal (if any) should be awarded. This would be an excellent and much faster way to judge all deserving models. This is how the forum should work and is why I suggest posting any proposal on the forum. The knowledge base is here.
  20. 1 point
    Beautiful work so far. Keep it going man, it's great following another masterful build from you.
  21. 1 point
    This kit is based on the new trilogy of the Planet of the Apes, and it is an excellent story for how it all began. This is a simple kit of two parts the bust and the base. It is expertly sculpted by Mark Van Tine and casted by Paul Gill. It all starts with a black primer. The base looks like it's brickwork covered in stucco, so that the way I went. Thanks for looking.
  22. 1 point
    As IPMS is a society for all genres with a big leaning towards the aircraft modeller that reflects the main plastic modelling interest catered for by manufactureres. I build classic car models, but even at Telford the number of classes for car models is diminutive compared to the number and range of aircraft classes. A couple of years back the scratch build cars class was dropped due to low entry levels, so my models now have to compete against detailed kits. I will still partake though to support the competition generally. Sometimes I wish that there were a number of model car clubs here in the UK like you enjoy in the States. Apart from special interest groups within IPMS UK there is nothing else that I am aware of. Not to say that car modelling is not popular in the UK. Far from it judging by the frightfully expensive kits that Hiroboy and Grand Prix Models sell, not counting the plastic auto kits more generally available. IPMS has to be all things to all modellers unlike specialist modelling groups, and therein lies its strength and it's weakness,. It's strength is that it caters for al!. But it's weakness is its leanings toward certain subjects dictated by the main interests of modellers generally!
  23. 1 point
    Here's a tiny resin kit from TD Cast. This was a 2015 Wonder Festival exclusive. Included a couple w.I.p. pics this time around. Once again hand finished in acrylics and artist inks with a scratch built base. Thanks for looking!
  24. 1 point
    Tedious painting on the Ki-45 camouflage continues. I tried masking the pattern and realized it was actually easier to just hand paint the jungle camouflage. The base coat is Japanese Army light green and the camouflage is Japanese Army dark green. In the end I really like the look of this camouflage. I then painted the wing leading edges yellow and the white fuselage stripe just forward of the tail. For the wing landing light I painted the light bezel chrome silver and filled it up with acrylic gel to simulate the lens. See all the details and photos in the blog build log at https://davidsscalemodels.com/build-log/1-48-ki-45-toryu-nick/ At this point I move the model to another table and upgraded the work bench area by adding work table to organize the work surface. Check out the updated photos of the working area on my blog at https://davidsscalemodels.com/gallery/the-studio/ The new workspace
  25. 1 point
    IMHO, for the reasons you describe, too much or too little weathering shouldn't be a consideration when judging. The realism of the technique is what should be considered. If the modeler chooses a factory finish or rust dripping to the ground, what matters is how well (or not) it was done and how realistic (or not) the weathering looks.
  26. 1 point
    This is a 537 scale kitbash I did last year. USS Akula is a Lynch Class Light Destroyer. Ship design is by Eric Kristiansen who has published several books on Federation ships and technology, most notably the Jackills Guide to Federation Ships. Akula has custom decals from Jbot, lower deflector dish from Federation Models, scratchbuilt connecting dorsal and a 4 color "Aztec" paint scheme using McKenzie water based taxidermy colors. I also put hatches for "life boats" on this build. I am currently working on Akula's sister ship, a 1.350 scale Lynch Class which I am making my first attempt at lighting ( so far so good! lol)
  27. 1 point
    Hello guys These are the things I've been working on lately, as my hands shake more and more with the passing of the years I'm dedicating more time to the 3d designing and some less to the "real" plastic things. Anyway these designs are later 3d printed so I can see them built and painted in the finished models. I hope you like them.
  28. 1 point
    Beautiful aircraft Ora! You did an exceptional job on it. Well done!
  29. 1 point
    Hi all, This was supposed to be a quick build, which it basically was. I started putting things together and before I knew it, it was practically done. I added some seatbelts in the cockpit and some brake lines and such on the landing gear. I also took the step out of the the leading edge slat area (the red area) where the top of the wing transitions to the slat well. The paint scheme came from the Classic Air Frames 1/48 kit. Paints used were Vallejo and Model Master. I resized the CA decal sheet from the kit and printed it on my computer. Overall they came out pretty good. I like the color scheme with the three blues/grays. This kit is ancient but it fit great. The detail is accurate and there aren't a million pieces. What's not to like? Any comments always welcome. Bill
  30. 1 point
    Thanks for the clarification. He'll have to finish another!
  31. 1 point
    Hi Joe Rule I.3 states (emphasis is mine): "Prior Winners. Models that have won First-, Second-, or Third-place, or Outof-the-Box awards in any category of any previous IPMS/USA National Model Contest may not be entered in any subsequent IPMS/USA National Model Contest for awards, except as provided in Section II, Rule 19 (last sentence) and Section III, Rules 5--7. Previous award winners can be used as noted in Dioramas, Collections, Triathlon and Group entries. Models that have won an award as part of a Collection, Triathlon or Group entry may also be entered individually in subsequent National Contests. However, models that have won individually, and as part of a Collection, Triathlon or Group entry, are not eligible for subsequent National Contests." Note that there is no exception for Juniors moving up to Standard categories in subsequent years. There is the qualifier in Rule I.2 that a Junior entrant may choose to enter any or all of his entries [for that year] in the Standard categories. Your son's model, and I am assuming we are talking about his excellent Perry frigate from the Omaha show, may be entered for an award as part of a diorama/vignette (II.19) or as part of a Trathalon, Collection, or Group Entry (III.5-7). It may also be shown as a Display Only entry. I hope this answers your question. Ed Grune NCC Head Ship Judge
  32. 1 point
    Spring snow storm update! Yes it is spring and the middle of April but I think someone forgot to tell Mother Nature. Snowing like crazy here. So spent the day finishing the weapons bays and starting on the landing gear bays. The front landing gear bay is done. I added some wiring and hydraulic lines as well. I drew out the shape and laid out the wires then CA glued them together then fit them inside the bay. The photo etch supplied the wall details. I then glued the weapons and nose landing gear bay into the lower half of the fuselage. Next moving to the main gear then the engines. More photos at https://davidsscalemodels.com/build-log/1-48-f-22-raptor/
  33. 1 point
    Starting the Eduard 1/48 MIG-21 PFM. I will be using the decal scheme for the Polish Air Force. The scheme represents the aircraft as it appeared in 1996. The kit includes photo etch details so no extra accessories were added. To begin I started with the cockpit and the engine exhaust. For the interior color, Vallejo makes a Model Color (70.838) which is a match to the interior color used on the actual aircraft. The cockpit section also has the nose gear bay attached. I detailed the bay walls and assembled them. The dash was multiple layers of photo etch and looks great. The exhaust was detailed with photo etch and then weathered with pastel chalk to add a level of realism. The main landing gear bay was assembled and detailed. I added some 32 awg wire for details. I added some weight to the nose cone so the aircraft would not drag the tail once fully assembled. All of these sections needed to be built so that the fuselage can be built up. Assembling the fuselage was a little tricky for the area around the cockpit. I had to trim the sides of the cockpit floor by removing about 1mm from each side to get the fuselage to meet together. You can see all the build photos in my build log https://davidsscalemodels.com/build-log/1-48-mig-21-pfm/
  34. 1 point
    I am proud to announce that my latest E-book is now available. The attached image should give you all the information. Any questions, don't hesitate to reply in this thread or send me a private message. And since a functioning hyperlink can't be inserted into an image, here are working links for your choice of E-book formats at smashwords.com or a printable PDF at scalepublications Now, who do I contact to submit a review copy?
  35. 1 point
    Mr. Willis: What you wrote, although a little more detailed and therefore longer than what our Survey working group would have prepared, is exactly the way we wanted the description of the 123 judging system to appear on the ballot- factual, unemotional, objective. Designed to inform, but not to persuade. Kudos to you! You must not have slept through those Civics classes that covered voting in an open honest system of government. At least somebody else gets it! Thank you. Regards, Nick
  36. 1 point
    Just spit-balling for fun here…based on my limited experience, the “Modeler’s Guide”, and previous responses to this thread, this is what I came up with as a brief “definition” of our 1-2-3 System: Current Form of Judging IPMS/USA National Contests (1-2-3) Model entries are evaluated based only on the entries in the categories of that year’s contest. They are compared only to each other, and judged irrespective of any perceived personal expertise of the entrant as the entrant is anonymous. The best model in the category on any given day is just that: of the models entered that day, this one is better than that one. Judges are IPMS members who volunteer their time. They follow the guidelines in our Modeler's Guide To IPMS Contests. According to that mandate, judges look at the whole model and determine how well the modeler did in bringing the whole project to completion, focusing first and foremost on “the basics”. While there will be class-specific (aircraft, armor, etc.) nuances, the overarching “basics” that will govern each class are construction, painting, and decaling. Judges only dig deeper when the basics do not allow for a clear-cut ranking. Judges are grouped in odd numbered teams to prevent a tie, and to provide balance when a judge may have a preference/bias. Currently, any judge can leave comments on any entrant’s model-entry sheet. Because the 1-2-3 system uses no “national standard” to compare all models, nor does it use a numeric system to present an unknown number of awards per category, inherently it defines the maximum number of awards to be purchased and presented. **Portions (if not all 😀) of my post are drawn from The IPMS/USA Modeler’s Guide To IPMS Contests, and previous responses in this thread. This is in no way meant to inflame, "one-up", or provide commentary on any other post in this thread. It is simply my stream-of-consciousness regarding this subject. Feel free to laud it, rip it to shreds, or print it out and use it as toilet paper.
  37. 1 point
    Nicely written tip! Thanks for the link! GIL
  38. 1 point
    This is an approx 1/3rd scale kit I obtained from Mark Warthling. It comes in 9 parts - the head/body, the stone arm, 2 sets of horns (long and short - I chose the short), a base and two name plates. The arm, base and one of the name plates are in translucent resin in case you want to light the kit. Once again it was a case of me jumping into things before taking the start image, but you'll see the clear resin along the way. I started with a tan primer, glued the horns in and then painted the face red. Reddened the face, and painted the hair black - When it came to the arm, I looked around and it was no where to be found. I contacted Mark, and for a little fee he was able to get me another. How can something that big go missing? I have no idea... Here you can see the translucent hand. Anyway, in the background you may be able to see I added a darker brown shadow to parts of the jacket. What I did to highlight the black hair was to use a little blue in it. All shirt references showed it was black, so I mixed a little blue into that to compliment the hair. You can also see the translucent base and the arm with primer. I also painted the zipper steel, and the little emblem on the pull the new Molotow Chrome. That stuff is amazing. Next was tackling the Dark brown leather collar and straps. You can see in the background the arm got it's coat of red - While I thought of it, I painted in the eyes. Hellboy had yellow sclera, with a light brown iris, and then the black pupil. With the squint the model has I just left of the sclera color... I fixed up the coloring on his head and now I'm happy with it. Hellboy is now complete. I didn't mention the base, but being translucent it calls out to be lit. Never having done lighting, I left it open for lights down the road. What I did tho, was dremel out more material in the symbols, and then seeing a miniatures trick I got some matte Mod Podge and mixed it with black craft paint until it was *dark*, then I painted thickly on (avoiding the symbols) the base. Does well with light blocking. It was crazy how many images I went thru before I found an definite image of the emblem on his sleeve. Only found one. Thanks for looking.
  39. 1 point
    LOL...great..I need to buy more paint Dave
  40. 1 point
    Thanks! I wish I had the set up for SBS photos but I work at the diner table most of the time. 😑
  41. 1 point
    Very cool! It has that Japanese mythical look to it. Very well done. Bill
  42. 1 point
    Awesome. Love the base Dave
  43. 1 point
    Bingo! Between the contest rules and the Modeler's Guide to Competition (as Nick reminded us, it is the document formerly known as the Competition Handbook), most questions should be answered well in advance of any model show. Rules. Huh! What are they good for? Well, absolutely everything... They get updated at the National level annually (more or less), and most other IPMS-sanctioned contests base their rules on the Nationals rules, so you need to read them in advance of any contest. Ask questions. If the rules don't suit you--if you have some fundamental disagreement with them--you have the option not to play, or ask for some "Display Only" space. More and more shows offer it these days...you may still have to pay an entry fee, but you can still show your stuff. The information is readily available. As Brad Hamilton told Jeff Spicoli in the movie "Fast Times at Ridgemont High", "Learn it. Know it. Live it."
  44. 1 point
    I call my stash my hedge fund against inflation!
  45. 1 point
    Since y'all are brainstorming ways to publicize modelbuilding in general, the IPMS/USA in particular and encourage people to visit and hopefully join local model clubs, consider the following possibilities: 1. Add the URL of your model club's website as a line under your signature on all emails you send. 2 Do the same for the IPMS/USA 3. Anytime you post something on your Facebook page...if it makes sense...include a hotlink to your club's website or IIPMS/USA website. 4. Ditto for any other social sites you happen to be on. 5. Do you have a blog about anything? See if you can work modelbuilding into a post in some way, shape or form. 6. Here's a biggie. All of us...at least many of us...write articles of some kind or produce youtube videos. Those who do can work URLs of modelbuilding club websites and/or the IPMS/USA website into. 7. And finally, those of you who write print and/or E-books need to do what I am now doing. In the About The Author section, mention your IPMS number at the very least. When it comes to E-books...especially those that you self-publish...you have all the room in the world to promote the IPMS/USA, include links to your modelbuilding club and on an on. Hope some of this helps. Not every person will do all of these things I've mentioned...or even most of them. But pick the one that works best for you and then do it. Show those who don't know that modelbuilding can be a fantastic and enjoyable hobby at the very least. Even better, you can even make a living at some aspect of it if you really want it and are persistent enough.
  46. 1 point
    Thanks Kevin! That is about eight coats of white and nine of clear gloss! It's the closes thing I've ever come to getting a smooth coat of paint.
  47. 1 point
    EJ, In the photography forum under "on the bench" there are more pics from when I started this kit back in 2014. I will add some other pictures soon. I used the Squadron "USS Wasp In Action" book for reference and internet photos. I don't know if thatSquadron book is still available. Thanks for looking. Mark, Thank you. This took on a life of it's own and I'm glad it is over. I enjoyed most of the time on it but it did get to me after awhile. Thanks Tony; always appreciated. Bill
  48. 1 point
    The interesting thing about discussing cost of military aircraft is that the development cost is always included in that discussion which really distorts the figures. When you talk about the F-35 they say it is 90 million per aircraft. The F-15 by comparison was 27 million. That was in 1972 dollars and for about 1300 aircraft. The F-35 is in current dollars and is for 1,800 aircraft. If there is a world wide demand for the aircraft that cost will go down even further. The latest contract dropped the cost by 5%. Out of 1,800 aircraft to spare 7 for the Thunderbirds hardly seems but a drop in the bucket. I can also see the Blue Angels going that route also. The last time both teams flew the same aircraft was the F-4. Also, it is not as if the aircraft are purpose built for the teams. Airframes circulate through the teams on a regular basis and are returned to full combat duty when they are done. The demonstration teams only have them on loan. Incidentally, the teams have had a requirement since they converted to the F-16 that the aircraft can be converted to combat ready within 48 hours. Google "Thunderbird F-16 Warbird" to see one actually meet that standard. Interesting story.
  49. 1 point
    Here's a little bust I was doing while l waiting for the paint and/or glue of Medusa to dry. I took this sculpt of Det. Columbo as a sort of sketch, as it's a bit rough, so I just left it that way. The bust didn't come with a name, so remembering his famous line to solve the case - "Oh, one more thing..." So that's what I'll do when I create a proper base for it. I agonized over the 5 o'clock shadow - too much too little - and back again. It was the first time I did it with paint. (vs. pastels). The other hard part was, after all the time spent trying to make eyes centered, was to have his one eye accurate and a little off. The inspiration - All done . Thanks for looking. CCs welcome. (On the shelf with the other lil busts)
  50. 1 point
    http://culttvman.com/main/a-modelers-guide-to-painting-the-starship-enterprise-by-gary-kerr/ http://culttvman.com/main/a-modelers-guide-to-painting-the-starship-enterprise-pt2-by-gary-kerr/
×
×
  • Create New...