Jump to content

Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/12/2019 in all areas

  1. 1 point
    Maybe you did, but I haven't worried about the exact color since 1976. Even though the Haze Grey was manufactured in a modern plant under peace time conditions, we still mixed the cans of paint to ensure consistency. Anyone that thinks there is an exact shade of paint beyond a color chip, is living in a cloudy cookoo land. The true check of a beginner is the "What is the best shade of...."question. The smaller something is, the darker the same shade of paint will look on it. I always find it a bit silly when a friend uses a real car paint on his model. Dak
  2. 1 point
    What can I say, David. Everything you and I say...as well as everyone else who has commented on this thread...is absolutely correct. Which comment/observation applies depends on the particular moment and the specific project's reason for being.
  3. 1 point
    As for the question of what part of modelbuilding do I enjoy? It depends...and varies from one project to the next. Building for a client? Then the client controls the answer. For a magazine article or print book? Then it depends on the deadline and how much space I have. Many, if not most, of my article subjects look better in print than they do in person due to limited time. And no, I'm not Shep Paine reincarnated, so I can't produce one of his Monogram dioramas in a month's time. Building for myself? Depends on the mood I'm in. Producing a model for one of my Modelbuilding Guides? Then I pay attention to everything from seams to details to aftermarket additions to paint to research to research to research. Building for an IPMS/USA Nationals? Haven't been there or done that and probably won't...unless I can figure out a way to make San Marcos in 2020.
  4. 1 point
    Wow, after a considerable time, I finally managed to get back to the workbench. Here's my latest progress on several models. I'll start with the church. Since I was putting a brown wash on the Austratt turret base, I also experimented with it on the side of the church building: Later on I'll drybrush some lighter grey over that to see how it looks. Speaking of the Austratt turret, here is the base with the brown wash on it. It can barely be seen in these pics but I assure you it is there and visible: I had also tried a dot filter on the sides of the turret as well, but it is not very visible here either: Later on I glossed this turret, then did a brown wash on the rivets, protrusions and seams and then dull coated this: Again, not very visible in these pics; all the effects can be seen better in person. After all this, I've declared this beastie done. Moving on, I experimented again with a dark earth drybrush on a portion of the church roof. The left side is not drybrushed, the right side is: That drybrush was done over a base coat of Oily Black paint on the tiles. Continuing on with ground elements, I was able to move forward on my George Creed Tribute Build for my friend. I first shot a modulation of a lighter green over the cab, trailer and missile: The missile was also drybrushed at this time. After that, just for fun I fitted the missile onto the trailer to see how it looks: I then detail painted the tractor portion with some Oily Black on the chassis and suspension as well as finished off the painting on other parts: That chassis and suspension later got a dry brush of steel over it. After that it got glossed for a wash. There seemed to be no markings on this tractor; at least the instructions didn't show any which I thought as odd, but I moved on. I wanted this done so I glossed the trailer and the missile and added the decals to both of them: Here is the missile and trailer all dullcoated after the decals had dried: My George Creed Tribute Build is finally done. After this I also moved ahead on my Israeli Nagmachon. There was a lot to before the photo etch went on. First off, I painted the photo etch. Then I glossed the model and added the decals plus a medium brown wash: Next came the dull coat and drybrush of a light sand over the details, as well as the painting of the machine guns: Finally the tracks and last side skirts were installed. This one is ready for the photo etch screens: And finally, I did manage to get some progress done on one of my aircraft. The Israeli Sufa needed more seams and gaps filled so I added some more Mr. Surfacer 500 to them: After some sanding and repainting, it looks much better. It still ain't perfect, but I'm far more happy with this: Next up will be the other two camouflage colors. And that completes my progress for this month so far. Hopefully I can finish that Nagmachon and Sufa this week. Thanks all for looking in, comments are most welcome.
  5. 1 point
    I agree, but at the same time realize these are things often hard to judge without first hand knowledge. Every operational vehicle I have been on or in is covered with foot prints. Still, many build their models as a case of immaculate perception. But it isn't fair for someone to do things correctly, but lose to a model with a lot of inaccurate, but aesthetically appealing details. I would love to see someone do a piece for the Journal on the basic dos and don'ts of modern armor stowage. It wouldn't have to be an in depth thing, just a photos and such showing authentic things. The more people know will make them better builders and judges. Dak
×
×
  • Create New...