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  1. 2 points
    Since when did abdominal laparotomy sponges become a household item? 😳 Does the Health Department know about this? 😀 Nick Filippone
  2. 2 points
    Nick, I am not the only moderator here. I can't read/moderate everything, on every forum, so I must rely on my fellow moderators to help out. Sorry if you're feeling I'm picking on you. I promise you I'm not. I can only answer for what I see. And yes, I have made mistakes or just missed things in the past and unfortunately will do so again. For that leniency I apologize, but not for enforcing the rules. I have chosen in the past, to give everyone a little leniency with the rules for the sake of debate, but apparently you are calling me on the carpet for that. So, in the future I will call it when I see it. I'm not looking for respect or anything else here. I'm just doing my job as best I can. All I ask from everyone, is common courtesy so we can all enjoy your and Dave's comments and lively debates.
  3. 2 points
    As a diorama judge for many years, my first question when I look at a diorama is "What story is it trying to tell me?" Those that make it very obvious, very quickly will have a greater chance of making it to the Final Three for that category. Another criteria is the consistency between items on the diorama. For example, if showing a desert scene, and 5 vehicles have matte finishes, but the 6th is glossy, I go read the entry sheet to see if the builder discusses why he/she did it this way. If there's no explanation, that inconsistency will make further progress more difficult during the rest of the judging session. The use of space is considered, but not as heavily as these two criteria. I hope these comments help you!
  4. 2 points
    OK, its not a real TNH, but the Tamiya 1/48 Panzer 38(T). The tank was developed in Czechoslovakia just before the war started. As a matter of fact, it wasn't even in service yet when the conflict began, so this example is rather spurious in its markings. The Germans thought so much of the vehicle they modified them slightly and equipped whole armored divisions with them (Rommels 7th in France for one) right up to the Russian campaign. The 37mm gun was as good or better as that mounted on any German tank at the time (with the possible exception or the Mk IV, but that 75mm was a short barreled infantry support weapon and besides that there were very few of them, even in France.) the armor was comparable and it was very dependable. The camo is typical per-war Czech camo. The little flag on the turret is from my imagination. I can't find many photos of pre-war Czech armor in Czech service, but it seems logical they would have some sort of national markings on their vehicles. I did this one strictly OOTB. These 1/48 Tamiya kits are just a delight to build. Fit is excellent and detail is very good. Tjhe length and link tracks are nicely done, but can be fiddly to get right and you can see a couple of my problem areas if you look closely. If you're not an armor builder but wonder what all the fuss is about with armor models, give one of these 1/48 kits a try OOTB. I bet you'll have fun with it.
  5. 2 points
    After a nearly 2 1/2 year hiatus from scale modeling, I chose this project to blow the dust off of my creativity. All told, I spent about a month from start to completion. This model depicts a Bf 109G-6 of 7./JG3 -White 10 + Black I, Bad Worishofen, 1944. The venerable Hasegawa kit speaks for itself, and there is no issues with assembly. In fact, there was no filler needed anywhere on the airframe. The only aftermarket I added was an Eduard PE seat harness. Chrome Bare Metal Foil was wrapped around the hydraulic oleo struts. The markings were from an 18 year-old Cutting Edge (Meteor Productions) sheet. Back in the day, Cutting Edge decals were my go-to for aftermarket markings. This sheet, however, gave me fits. The spiralschnauze would not lay down, so I substituted it with one from an old Eagle Strike sheet. After, of course, sanding the spinner clean and repainting/glossing. The meteors fractured in several spots, necessitating touch-ups with white paint. But, the strangest thing was the fuselage Balkenkreuze-both sides, after being set with Mr. Mark Softer, and clear coated, weathered, and semi-gloss coated-lifted from the plastic and bubbled up! Granted, the Mr. Mark Softer was maybe 6 or 7 years old, and there was not much left in the bottle, so that may have played a factor. So, I stripped the fuselage of those two decals, cleaned up the areas, re-painted the areas, re-glossed the areas, and used the kit’s markings. These performed well. The antennae wire is stretched sprue. Having not completed (or really worked on anything for that matter) for nearly three years made this project a humbling experience. There’s a lot of room for improvement, and I have a lot of work to do in the future. Thanks for looking…
  6. 2 points
    I've had this one done for a while and just got around to rigging it. Usual out of the box with a minimum interior added. The decals were way gone and I didn't want to spend stupid money for new ones, so these are spurious markings I cobbled together and a paint scheme that is an amalgam of several I have seen. The rockets were used to shoot at zeppelins and observation balloons, but most sources cannot site where one was actually shot down with them.
  7. 1 point
    Per the hotel website, they have 283 rooms, so a 260 room block is a decent set-aside
  8. 1 point
    I acquired this kit in Dec, 1978 and its been sitting on my stash shelf until April/May of this year. The kit supplied metal rods to use as rigging and that worked out fairly well.
  9. 1 point
    Everyone has their own style. That’s what makes it art. Dak
  10. 1 point
    I can tell who's model is whose by looking at it...doesn't matter. Basics are basics.
  11. 1 point
    I just went to the Sword and Brush figure show in Toronto this past weekend. While judging is a little different in that they use the open system, they still do have "best of" categories which are directly competitive. Regardless, all the names were plainly visible and everyone knew what everyone else entered and the sky didn't fall. I suspect this tradition does more for the perception of objectivity rather than objectivity itself. As Dak points out, a lot of the time, especially at local shows, judges have a good idea who entered what anyways, and are pretty objective regardless. I don't think it does much for actual objectivity; it's just a little piece of theatre to make the entrants feel better. Finally... Dak makes a good point in that there are benefits to having names public. In the world of social media, if someone made a piece you like, you can look that person up and talk to them about it, maybe make a new friend (which is way more valuable than a plaque or a deal in the vendor hall), or ask them for advice. I once had someone try to look me up after a show because he liked one of my pieces, but since my name wasn't visible, there was a lot of "hey, does anyone know who made this?"
  12. 1 point
    Another thing I see, which is way too common, is neat rubble. For some reason many think rubble falls so vehicles will have a clear smooth path on the ground or pavement. The builder wants a big pile of rubble and blown up buildings, except for this clear track through the mess. If you want a dirty mess, don't make it look like someone swept up where the tank is rolling. Dak
  13. 1 point
    Greetings all, I hope most of you have decompressed after a most excellent convention in Chattanooga just a few short weeks ago. As promised here is the first update of many regarding next year’s national convention in San Marcos, TX. First, the question that I know is on many people’s minds is “when do rooms open up”? The IPMS-specific room reservation links - that give you the convention rate - will go live next Saturday, September 7th at the following time: 11:00AM Eastern 10:00AM Central 9:00AM Mountain 8:00AM Pacific The links will be on the convention website: www.nats2020.com/registration_pages/hotels.html. There will be links for the Embassy Suites plus all four overflow hotels. If you missed my presentation at the Chattanooga convention, I announced that we will be providing a shuttle bus to run (free of charge) on all four days of the convention from approximately 8AM to 8PM each day (we will work to move the last time back to later in the evening on Saturday to take into account the awards banquet). This shuttle will run a loop between the Embassy Suites, the four overflow hotels, downtown San Marcos, and the Premium & Tanger outlet malls. Right now, we’re anticipating it will stop at each location at least once an hour. Speaking of shuttles, we will also be providing a free shuttle service from Austin-Bergstrom International Airport (i.e., Austin, Texas) to the Embassy Suites and overflow hotels on the Wednesday and Thursday of the convention (July 29th and 30th). This shuttle will make a run once every 2-3 hours starting at noon and make the last run around 9PM. We will have a small welcoming team staffed by the IPMS Austin Scale Modelers Society to greet convention guests and direct them to the shuttle bus stop. If you make reservations with Embassy Suites there will be an option to select parking for $10 per night. Disregard this as parking is free; it is in the contract with IPMS/USA that guests will not be charged for parking. In-room Wi-Fi is also included in the price of the room as per the contract. Theme Awards: We are close to getting the wording down for the theme awards and I will post these to the web site soon (before the end of September). Theme awards will be listed under the “Contest” page of the 2020 Nationals website: www.nats2020.com/contest.html. The details on our various staff members is up on the website as well. For questions on specific areas of the show you may reach out to each of them: www.nats2020.com/staff.html. We will be diligently working on adding details to the website in the coming months once these details are ironed out. We expect show registration to begin in early 2020 to include banquet tickets, tour tickets and various seminars that will require tickets (only a few). The staff is also working on details of the t-shirts as well as the possibility of hats (still weighing this one). Of course, pins and decals are in the works and we will have final designs and products in the spring of 2020. Feel free to reach out to me at this address (director.nats2020@gmail.com) with any questions you might have. If I have an answer, I will most definitely share it. If I don’t, I will work to find the person that does. I will post updated details to the website as well as: Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/IPMSUSA-National-Convention-2020-451660115577640 Twitter: @2020Nats Please feel free to forward this e-mail to as many IPMS members that you know and that would appreciate this information to include any of your internal club e-mail distributions. I will continue to add names to my personal distro list for the 2020 show…which as of the time of this writing is over 350 members. Finally - I sent the above note to all of you that sent me your e-mail address. I got about a 10% bounce back from all the addresses I have collected. If you did not receive an e-mail check your spam filter and ensure it is set to receive e-mails from "director.nats2020@gmail.com". I will continue to add names and send out e-mails in the coming year as details are finalized. Best Regards, Len Pilhofer IPMS# 49932 Director, IPMS/USA National Convention 2020 www.nats2020.com
  14. 1 point
    This is a combination of the new Airfix kit with the Eduard PE interior set (SS432), the Pavla Mk III ASW conversion kit (U72-134), the S.B.S. Swordfish rigging wire set (72050)and using the eduard Swordfish mask set (CX316). There are many reviews of the new Swordfish, so I won't go into that. The PE interior set consists mainly of assorted control panels, seatbelts. and machine gun detail parts. The all fit fine and "busy up" the interior nicely. The ASW conversion consist of the radar equipment, a new place for its operator, a radio, larger oil cooler, new side panel to cover where the forward mg was, the flame dampener for the exhaust, th "hump" for the radar scanner and the antennae for the wings. These parts are all nicely done in resin with the exception of the new cover for the radar compartment, which is vacu-formed (you get two in case you screw one up) and the antennae, which are PE. The mask set gives you masks for the windscreen, inside and out, and wheels. Finally, the rigging set gives you a full set of PE bracing wires all made to fit perfectly. You do not get, however, the flying wires for the elevator nor the antennae, which I thought was odd. It makes for a fiddly little model in this scale with all these parts and cutting things out and shaving things off and putting replacement things back on, but the result is as you see it. I wanted to do one with the rocket racks underneath, but the racks in both the old Airix and Matchbox kits are primitive and there are none in the new release. So, I made new ones from scratch. The rockets came from the spares box. The markings are spurious as there are no Mk III markings in the Airfix kits and the ones I had left over from the Matchbox kit had gone south long ago.
  15. 1 point
    For this week on the Thunderbolt I have most of the base coat painting done. I have the invasion stripes painted on. The main landing gear doors were then painted. For the insignias on the side of the fuselage I scanned the decals into the computer then printed them onto a sheet of paper. The insignias were then cut out and I taped them to a wide piece of blue painters tape on a piece of glass. A hobby knife was then used to trim around the paper leaving me with a mask for them. The mask was then removed from the glass and aligned into position. I did this so that the area under the insignias would not have the black and white stripes show thru the decals. The white area was painted then the black stripes. The side insignias on the aircraft have a natural metal finish (NMF) outline just under the insignia. The decal set provides this. Once the insignia decal was placed I carefully slid the NMF stripes into place. There is also a couple of NMF decals for the intercooler doors. While it may look a little tricky to place the decals on the various surfaces it went very well. The decals conform well and fit into the areas perfectly. Since I have the ammunition doors open, I once again used the paper insignia to mark where the decal goes and where I needed to make cuts for the ammo panel and the wing. I then scored the surface of the decal where the cuts were needed and slid the decal into place. While the decals are nice and thin, They are not difficult to maneuver into place. The landing gear was attached and the center drop tank was detailed and installed. I still have some of the side decals to install and then the checkers for the nose. Then I can move on to the finer details and weathering. Check out the build log for all the details from the start at https://davidsscalemodels.com/build-log/1-48-p-47d-thunderbolt-bubbletop/
  16. 1 point
    The “I have a bunch of models, so let’s put them on the same base” is a poor approach to dioramas. I wish more would read Shep Paine’s books. Dak
  17. 1 point
    Agree. I'm in favor of more compact dioramas and vignettes. IMHO one focal point is all that is needed and if there is a lot of open space, it is wasted space and should be omitted. I'm in a group on FB and all I see is all this open, empty space on a dio with maybe one vehicle and a handful of figures. It may match the antique image, but unless one is being asked to recreate a scene for a museum, the dio could and should be made more compact. Just my 2¢.
  18. 1 point
    This is a typical Special Hobby mixed media kit. Mostly injection plastic parts with some for inexplicable reasons in cast resin and a small PE fret. the instructions are vague at best. Some confusion arises as this is based on their Skua kit and there are some parts not used and others that are substituted for other parts. It goes together pretty well and has a detailed cockpit, but the canopy is molded in one piece so it is pretty invisible. One problem, however, was that the quad mg's mount was wider than the slots in the turret, but when you cut it down to fit the turret, it's too narrow to span the turtleback fairing behind the turret. That's why the guns are up in the air on mine. In reality the a/c was a complete failure, even as a target tow. It did, however, have one confirmed kill while escorted by several Skuas, a Ju-88 in Norway. Speaking of Skuas, that last picture is with an old Frog Skua for comparison.
  19. 1 point
    The shading is something I am working on. After I have applied the last flat/dull coat, I have been using pastels applied with those small plastic sponge applicators you can buy. I pick a shade of the color on the model either a little lighter or darker and then rub the applicator on the pastel to get some on it and then drag/rub it along the panel line. After I"m done, I use a broad softer paint brush to even out the finish and blend the shading in. It's not perfect and I don''t know if it ever will be, but it is MUCH easier than all that pre-post shade painting and puts less paint on the model itself. Plus, if you screw up, you can wash it off and try again.
  20. 1 point
    And I would suggest that is the way it should be. On the Nationals level...heck, on almost any level...failure to drill out a gun barrel or automotive tailpipe is definitely not trivial. Picky, yes, but realistically, rationally picky.
  21. 1 point
    I made a video (with the assistance of my talented son) of a tutorial on how to cut open panels on model aircraft. You can do this if you plan on opening panels on a model to detail the interior of an aircraft panel. I made this while opening the wing panels on my P-47D build to show the ammunition bays in the wing. Check out the video in the Tips and Tricks section. https://davidsscalemodels.com/tips-and-tricks/cutting-open-panels-on-aircraft-models/
  22. 1 point
    Solstice- one of two times in the year when the sun reaches its lowest (winter) and highest ( summer) point in the noon sky. Solace- support, consolation, etc. Just sayin,’ Nick
  23. 1 point
    If people would simply stop trying to find loopholes and figure out ways to beat the system it would be simple. Virtually every rule there was in response to some entry that wasn't kosher.
  24. 1 point
    Well, as noted in the build thread HERE: Here are the final pics of the B-17 that started to be converted to a YB-40, but ended up as the XB-40, something you may not have seen much of before! Thanks for looking. See you next time, Ed
  25. 1 point
    I also want to thank you Mike and your entire team for putting on one of the absolute best Nationals I'd ever attended. It was one incredible ride from start to finish and the number of models on the tables was by far the most I;d ever seen anywhere! Your operation ran smoothly to me and everyone was so incredibly friendly and welcoming. What a magnificent time!
  26. 1 point
    I'm going to mention the one thing NOT mentioned thus far that was applicable when the OOTB categories were created, and that is still applicable today: the builder's perception. OOTB was created because the "regular" builders had the perception that the ONLY way to win at the NATS was to be able to scratchbuild. Remember, back in those days there was NO aftermarket....no resin, no pe, no 3D printing.....so if you wanted to super-detail a model, scratchbuilding was the name of the game. People wanted a category where they didn't HAVE to do that....so the OOTB categories were created. While it's true that the kits are better today, the PERCEPTION of the builders is that you still need to do some sort of extra work to have an true chance at winning in a "regular" category. True or not...THAT is still the perception by a lot of builders. Thus, the OOTB categories are STILL relevant, since they give builders the perception they have a better shot at winning without having to go head to head with the honchos. The proof of this (as mentioned above) is in how well populated those categories still are at every Nats. The idea of competing on a more level field of play is not obsolete, despite the rise in kit quality. OOTB should not be eliminated until the majority of builders feel that they can go head to head with anyone and have a chance of winning, and they stop entering in the OOTB categories and switch to the regular categories. In short, when OOTB dies of its own natural causes due to lack of particpation. As long as there are 1-2-3 contests where models are pitted against each other, that perception of wanting to compete against builders of a like skill level will persist, and OOTB is the simplest way to do that in 1-2-3. GIL
  27. 1 point
    I've been to a number of conventions and never found one to be less than satisfactory, or less than very enjoyable for that matter. Every convention had its problems, some with problems that were rather severe. All but a very few handled those problems and their Leadership Teams deserve a "well done" for addressing those issues. Of all of the conventions I've attended I found that the Chattanooga crew, led by Mike Moore, was the most enjoyable convention I've attended as a participant. And looking at those conventions in which I volunteered to take a duty station, I found the Chattanooga crew, Mike Moore, Tim Simmons, and Ed Sunder, to be excellent leaders and coordinators. Congrats to Mike and his team for an excellent experience!
  28. 1 point
    This week’s update covers the landing gear bays and the landing gear. The bays were detailed with the photo etch side panels and cables/lines. The tail wheel was then painted and installed. I used the photo etch doors for the tail wheel. The main gear was then detailed and painted along with a couple of kit decals for the landing gear placards. Some photo etch details were added to the fuselage and I started the base coat of paint on the bottom and the ID stripes on the tail and stabilizers. Working on painting the base coat of the invasion stripes on the lower fuselage and wings then I will be starting the decals. All details and photos can be seen in my build log at https://davidsscalemodels.com/build-log/1-48-p-47d-thunderbolt-bubbletop/
  29. 1 point
    We are pleased and excited to have won the honor of hosting the 2021 National Convention in the fabulous city of Las Vegas, Nevada. Special thanks to TJ and the IPMS USA National Board for allowing us to make our presentation and all the help they provided in its preparation. We will be posting regular updates and relative news on the forum as we move along. For all those that were unable to attend our presentation on Saturday, you will please find below the details on the 2021 Convention. We hope to have the website up and running in the next few weeks. A PDF of our formal presentation is available upon request. Email Address: IPMSLV@aol.com Website Address: natcon2021lv.com Dates: August 18 – 21, 2021 Location: Rio Hotel Resort & Convention Center - 3700 W Flamingo Rd, Las Vegas, NV 89103. The Rio is 10 minutes from the McCarren International Airport and walking distance to the Famous Las Vegas Strip. Presentation Video: https://youtu.be/1LTgEeuiP_c Accommodations: 2,200 All-Suite Rooms @ $113.00 per night (including resort tax) for all nights. Free On-site Parking On-site Amenities: 13 restaurants (all budgets) 14 bars & nightclubs 4 Swimming Pools On-site shopping, Spa’s and Salons. Convention Space: 65,000 Square feet, carpeted, well lite. Just an elevator ride away to hotel rooms. First floor, easy load-in and load-out for Vendors No Union or loading fees! We’ll have the room reservation code soon and will post it ASAP. Any questions please let us know. Thanks for everyone’s support and we hope to see you all in Las Vegas in 2021. Bob Lomassaro President & Convention Chairman IPMS Las Vegas
  30. 1 point
  31. 1 point
    Yeah, it was so streamlined that it hardly impeded the airflow. 😲 In a strong head wind, at max speed I think it could hover
  32. 1 point
    Personally, my preference for GSB isn't based on a lack of confidence in my abilities or any other personal failing (of which I have many!). While I do occasionally have that self-hating artist streak, I will gladly enter into both 123 and GSB local and regional contests. And, not to brag too much, I do have a decent collection of hardware from both, so I would say that I can at least hold my own in my area of expertise. For me, the crux of the matter is that I believe GSB promotes and encourages a much healthier attitude towards competition and towards the hobby in general than 123.
  33. 1 point
    Greetings all, As I mentioned at the awards ceremony at Chattanooga last weekend I will be maintaining several communication methods in the coming months leading up to next year's convention: 29 July - 1 Aug at the Embassy Suites and Conference Center in San Marcos, TX. First, if you would like e-mail updates directly from me I will be sending these out as important information becomes available and confirmed (hotels, registration, etc). Many of you signed up on our e-mail distro list we had at the 2020 table in the main hallway of the Chattanooga Convention Center. For those of you who were not there, or missed the opportunity to give us your e-mail, please send me an e-mail at "director.nats2020@gmail.com" with the subject "E-mail Distro Add" and I will add you to my distro list. I will also be posting updates to two social media sites: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/IPMSUSA-National-Convention-2020-451660115577640 Twitter: @2020Nats All information pertaining to next summers convention (i.e., website) will be located here: http://www.nats2020.com. As information becomes available and confirmed I will add it to the site. And finally, I will be posting major announcements here on the forum as well as checking it (almost) every day for any questions about next year's convention. Best Regards, Len Pilhofer
  34. 1 point
    I refer you to National Contest Rules (2019) which should be considered the current contest rules unless or until the National Contest Committee makes any changes for next year. ( These are still on the IPMS Website home page.) Section III, No. 2, letter D is pretty explicit in that it states that improving the model by replacing parts would make the entry no longer eligible for an OOB category. Currently accepted exceptions are defined elsewhere under No. 2. Replacing parts that the builder feels are poorly molded or inaccurate is not one of the listed exceptions. As always, in grey areas, the judging staff has the final word. And, of course, keeping the playing field level, always, in the end, depends on the integrity of the modeler. If I may, I will let you in on a little secret of which you may not be aware. If you want to maximize your chances of winning in an OOB category and still obey the rules, pick a good kit and do a good job on it. Trying to resurrect a poorly molded lump of plastic by building it OOB and hoping to make a winner out of it in an OOB category is more work than it probably deserves. You may be such a good modeler that you can bring a 1970’s kit up to modern standards. But having done it, the result would not be OOB. Good luck. Regards, Nick Filippone, Senior National Judge
  35. 1 point
    This update covers the building and detailing of the engine and the detailing of the ammunition bays for the wing guns. The engine cylinders were painted aluminum, weathered with black and dark gray pastel chalk, then the photo etch wiring was added. The hub was painted neutral gray and detailed with silver and black. The wiring was panted canvas brown. I obtained some decals for the ID plates. I opted to use the open cowls so I added the cowl braces included with the photo etch set. The engine was mounted into the cowl and the assembly was mounted to the fuselage. Next I cut open the panels in the wing (a tutorial on cutting open panels will be posted later this week) and assembled the photo etch ammunition bays. The ammo belts were then fed into them and mounted to the wing. A little detail painting and the bays are done. I am working on the landing gear bays now. You can see all the details and photos from the start in my build log at https://davidsscalemodels.com/build-log/1-48-p-47d-thunderbolt-bubbletop/
  36. 1 point
    Gentlemen, Finished late last night. All that's left to do now is build the base. Since it would have been a lot of work to drop the flaps, and leading edge slats, I'm going to pose it cruising down a taxiway. This build was actually a very good learning experience for me, as far as finishes. While attending the Nationals last week, I had the chance to sit down with a car modeler. He gave me A LOT of info on finishes, and how to make them pop. What he has done in the past, and what has worked best for him. He was a tremendous help, and he answered every question I had. I used the above spray paints to complete the project. I decanted them, and thinned them with Testors airbrush thinner. The humidity here in Kentucky has been brutal. I do all my airbrushing in my garage. I've got a large dehumidifier which I now turn on about two hours before I paint. I set it at 45%. After I painted everything, I would let it sit for about 48 hours in the house. I used #2 Novus polish only to polish out everything. Used a 100% cotton cloth to put it own (sparingly) Except for decaling, I worn nitrile gloves every time I handled the model. I spent around 10 hours polishing everything. It was a lot of work. I did not clear coat anything after the decals were applied. Didn't really see a need to. The only thing that I dirtied up was the landing gear. The actual landing gear is pretty dirty. I used the clear windows for everything. On the actual aircraft, the cargo compartment is a bright white. Although you cant see it, I added seat belts, seat cushions, and decals on the instrument panel. Cant wait to start the base. Regards Christopher
  37. 1 point
    Whenever I get asked why I present "Model Building 101" at a National Convention--I mean, this is the World Series/Super Bowl of modeling, right? People should know this stuff, right? I believe your post provides the answer--I always say that basic things are what the judges look for, and ignoring basics will trip you up more times than not. Alignment is usually #1 on the list of the things that answer the question "Why didn't my model win?" Then there are "the little things"--drilled out gun barrels, those pesky ejection pin marks that you thought were not visible, that minuscule parting line that you forgot to remove... By the way, it was great to finally meet you in Chattanooga... Cheers! Ralph
  38. 1 point
    Having given it some thought, I think we are barking up the wrong tree. If we really want to improve the National contest....any of them for that matter, we should change to a skill level format. Novice, advanced and master divisions. Let the entrant pick the level they are comfortable entering. Go easier on the Novices and very hard on the Masters. Reduce the classes to the basics and using a Single Award System, apportion awards based on the number of entries in each class. Maybe use Bronze, Silver, and Gold to color code the skill levels. Getting newbies to participate is the key to increasing IPMS membership. Allowing them to get their feet wet without having to swim in the deep end is a good way to accomplish that. Dak
  39. 1 point
    FYI - Martin Kovac has a YouTube Channel with very informative model tutorials. Mostly armor models but the techniques are usable on any genre. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNM5EknY1XBA9buLmJqYLdw/videos.
  40. 1 point
    In case you haven't heard about it yet, Martin Kovac has been putting out some very informative videos on all aspects of armor model building. Great stuff and worth a watch. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNM5EknY1XBA9buLmJqYLdw/videos
  41. 1 point
    Glad to be here, lets get this party started!
  42. 1 point
    One of the benefits of creating box dioramas is the ability to control perspective. The topic of forced perspective is covered in both Shep Paine's How to Build Dioramas and Ray Anderson's The Art of the Diorama. In my diorama Witness, I attempted to create forced perspective outside the "box" so to speak. The diorama was inspired by the movie Close Encounters of a Third Kind and a modeling theme of my particular IPMS chapter to create something from the movies. I envisioned a witness to the event who has pulled his car off the highway in the mountains and observes a roadblock on the highway below and below that (on the desert floor) the alien craft by the highway with two army tanks next to it. But above this witness, is another witness who is on a desert dirt bike and spies on him through a pair of binoculars. The diorama is on four levels which represent four scales: 1/12 for the man on the dirt bike on the top level of the diorama, 1/87 HO scale for the witness who has pulled off the road on the next level, 1/160 N scale for the government roadblock on the next level and 1/220 Z scale for the tanks and the huge alien craft. The viewer looks at the diorama from the perspective of the 1/12 scale man on the dirt bike and sees the cars and highway become smaller and smaller as it is farther in the distance. Below is a side view of the various levels and the view from the viewer's perspective. An "out of the box" experience! (See planning this diorama on our site at https://midnightoilstudios.org/2018/05/13/witness/)
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