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  1. I can't wait till is over! 🙂
    6 points
  2. Hi. My last racer, Polish PZL P6, made from scratch in 1/32 scale, from National Air Racers in Cleveland 1931 More on the topic here: https://forum.largescaleplanes.com/index.php?/topic/84035-pzl-p6-1931-from-scratch-scale-132/ Best regards, Marcin IPMS Polska
    5 points
  3. The other alternative--one I favor, and one I've discussed on this forum before--is to limit out of box models to being just that--out of the box. Period. No added seat belts, rigging, spark plug wires, etc., unless it comes in the kit and is shown on the instruction sheet. Aftermarket decals should be allowed, but that's as far as it really should go. People then argue along the lines of "well, the model will seem to be lacking if I don't add seat belts" or "it won't be accurate if there are no railings" (that one still confuses me, since, last time I checked, accuracy was not a judging criteria). My answer? Entering out of box is a decision the modeler makes. You have consciously decided to limit what you can and cannot do if you decide to enter OOB. Don't like the limitations? Then simply don't restrict yourself by entering OOB--enter the "Open" categories and let the chips fall where they may. To be sure, I have seen OOB models win categories over a dozen fully detailed models because, as Chris points out, the more stuff you add, the more opportunity there is for mistakes. As far as multi-media "high tech" (aka ProfiPack, etc.) go, the work around is as Ed pointed out--split them into traditional (all plastic) and mixed media.
    5 points
  4. I got this kit in a grab bag of kits I bought. It's from the 1956 molds and even had the pilot's head molded in halves integral to the fuselage sides. There are many inaccuracies and omissions, so to build it 'right' would be a real waste of time as there are now many other much better representations, including Airfix's own excellent re-tooled one. But I decided to do it just for fun, so I did it as a desk model and since it was to be in flight, I added the 'spinning' prop. I also rigged it, which was not called for in the instructions, and added the antenna, which you may notice is the wrong configuration, but since there were so many other 'problems' and it was simpler to do this way, I settled for it amongst all the other inaccuracies, which includes the markings. The kit's decals were useless, so I got some out of the spares box. They actually belong to a Hawker Fury of First Squadron, but hey, in for a penny in for a pound, inaccuracy-wise.
    4 points
  5. What is there to say about the Sopwith Camel? It is one of the iconic aeroplanes of WWI, probably the most well known from the Royal Flying Corps/Royal Air Force to even the novice aviation buff. And helped out no doubt by a certain cartoon beagle and his never ending quest to defeat the Red Baron. This is Monogram’s 1979 retool of Aurora’s 1956 vintage kit. I added a few bits to the interior, and detailed a few exterior bits. Rigging is steel wire and EZ Line, paints are Xtracolor, Humbrol, and Testors enamels. Decals are by Eagle Strike for a Camel from 45 Squadron flown in Italy in summer 1918 by Lt. C.M. Masters. posed with my Oeffag Albatross, my first grown up biplane build from a few years ago And ready for the dawn patrol Thanks for looking, comments and critiques are welcome
    4 points
  6. 1/4 scale bust of Thulsa Doom by Kent Kidwell Dave
    4 points
  7. Well the postman brought this a few hours ago. Thank you to the gentleman from another site who found this at a local shop for a great price and offered to pick it up and send it to me! I love the “painting guide for lozenge pattern camouflage” labeling... on such a large subject that’s gonna drive me crazy! But then again, I used to parachute out of perfectly good airplanes in the middle of the night, so I have screw loose upstairs somewhere...
    4 points
  8. Finally, after many years, this is finished. I can say that there were not wo pieces in the entire build that fit together easily. And Trumpeter found ways to take one part and make four out of it. I will say it is a huge plane and I do love Navy schemes. Finished with Squadrons decals Dave
    4 points
  9. Hi to all, I present my latest work performed with the MWP technique (Metal Work Panels) or with the complete covering of the model with aluminum panels (self-adhesive tape). This is the Hong Kong Models kit for the 1/32 scale B-25 J Mitchell 'The Strafer' model: the kit has been further improved with the following optional accessories: The version chosen (optional Zotz Decals) is the following: North American B-25 J Mitchell "Lady Lil" (correct nose for this version ) Hong Kong Models kit 1/32 scale model - version: 498thBs "Falcons", 345bth Bomber Group " Air Apaches" 5th AF in Philippines, May 1945 image posted for exclusive technical and historical reference for this thread this is the technique (sample from the wip) used to cover the model with ultra-thin and self-adhesive aluminum panels (MWP technique) : Happy surfing: cockpit interior (extracted from wip): below you can better appreciate the metal oxidation process on the engine nacelles (extracted from the wip): internal bomb compartment (extracted from the wip): Thanks for the attention. for more info & pics :http://www.adventurephotomodels.com George
    4 points
  10. When I started building this kit I decided to re-scribe the model and it went well for a while. As I progressed AMS got hold of me because I felt some of the panel lines weren't perfect and so I put it away. Then one day I just said phooey to AMS and started building as is. So here is the A-20 out of the box that AMS caused so much anxiety.
    3 points
  11. No.....as usual, you ignore everyone's answer that what YOU think is important, is not; and continue to argue the point. You've had at least 2 (or more) national judges with over 20yrs experience tell you that your example is just a part of judging, and we cannot always tell which way to go, or catch everything, or always be right. When YOU judge, feel free to try to solve this dilemma in a way that satisfies you, as none of us can do so. Gil
    3 points
  12. If you want an extremely detailed Sherman, this kit is a must have. The price that I paid (my wife) was well worth it. There are ALOT of parts in this kit. Because I'm going to use this one with the other two that I built in a diorama, I decided to cut open the Turret and Hull so that you can see inside. So that you can see everything , I used a multi-colored mini LED set. I've never added lighting to a model before. With the help of my son, I got a crash course in soldering. The LED's that I am using have two different colors in one "bulb". White for non-tactical, Red for tactical. The controller for the lights, has 8 different settings to choose from. (It even has one setting for Disco Tech). I'm also adding lighting in the hull. I painted the interior Tamiya flat white. I added chipped paint (Tamiya Metallic Grey) with a torn up make up sponge. After it dried, I shot DullCoat on everything. I then applied Tamiya brown accent color to all the detail. Once it dried, I used mineral spirits to scrub away the excess wash. The engine compartment will be open with two mechanics working on it. A third mechanic will be driving a jeep with all their tools. This process has been a long one, but well worth it, I think. If anyone sees anything out of place, or incorrect, please let me know. Chris
    3 points
  13. This is the Airfix Do217 first issued in 1960. It is built as the instructions indicated and I also used the paints recommended by Airfix. The hardest part was masking the nose which I did one frame at a time. The landing gear is missing support structs and should be added. I did sand all surface detail and did some minor scribing. I also used the kit decals. So here she is built just as Airfix indicated in the instructions.
    3 points
  14. I'm sure that you've all heard the phrase "my eyes are bigger than my stomach"? Meaning don't bite off more than you can chew. I've always been intrigued by dioramas. The stories that they tell can be awesome. I've always felt that the best aspect of a good diorama is one that each new time that you look at it you find some new hidden detail that you missed the previous time. I finally decided, a few years back, that I was going to build my first diorama. Being a car guy it almost made sense that I would do a garage with vehicles, tools, supplies, etc. I also like nature so I wanted to incorporate some added outdoors scene as well. So, one thing led to another and the next thing you know my design is way out of control and taking up a tremendous amount of space. It was fun but finding somewhere to store it/display it when it was done was no easy task. I also only took this to one contest after it was done because of the size and weight. Here it is. I framed the garage completely out of wood. Removable roof, real shingles, opening garage door and as much detail as I could throw at it without it becoming too busy. It was great learning experience that mainly taught me that if I ever did any more dioramas, (which I have) to keep the size in check.
    3 points
  15. Adding another of those odd little models to the collection, may I present the Lockheed YF-97, later known as the YF-94C. I've never seen one built, so I decided to give it a shot... For those who might be interested, the build thread for this model is HERE Without further ado, the pics: A fairly simply conversion. I hope you'll try one yourselves! Thanks for looking in, Ed Quote "Dispensing the Tribal Wisdom since before there WAS a Tribe!"
    3 points
  16. This was one of the short run kits from RS Models in 1:72. My penchant for the odd was a little off in that this plane wasn't that weird and it actually got made. The so called "weird" part was that they install a jet engine in the rear. The Luftwaffe didn't go for it because of the expense, but a few were made for other countries. And here it is all done. The instructions said the paint was RLM 02, but my phone had other ideas. Thanks for looking.
    3 points
  17. In an attempt to enlarge my Medusa collection I picked up the offering from Greenwell Studio quite a while ago. Looking for something to build, I dug deep and pulled this out of my stash pile. First thing I noticed was that her snakes were really tentacles. OK... Close enuff, lets get on with it. In the kit there were 3 tentacles that had to be glued on to the head, with no readily apparent place for them. First job was to find an old pic that gave me a clue. Base colors started - Working on the tentacles - Didn't like the purple on the tentacles, and also changed a few other things. Worked on the eyes and of course goofed one of them up. The R eye is a two timer. 😉 But all done.
    3 points
  18. Vinyl kits. Don't like the fish Dave
    3 points
  19. With the national called off, I got busy doing some figure painting. The busts are from Nuts Planet, and Youngs miniatures. The girls with the goggles is Honey Bee and I have no idea what company made her (she was a gift). I cheat and use Archer eyes and some other decals on parts of the figures. I did paint the leopard skins on the Hussars free hand. I do make my own bases. The armor I did with Alclad. The rest is oils over enamels. The Opalinski brothers are real people that are also characters in some books by Eric Flint. Dak
    3 points
  20. The loooong promised 3D printed kit of the USS Choctaw ironclad ram is now available from Flagship Models. Price is $170.00 plus shipping and worth every penny. Incredible detail abounds such as iron plating, doors (with hinges and other detail), full blown photo etch sheet, 3D rendered instructions, painting guide, real Mahogany masts, detailed paddle wheels, boat davits and other parts metal cast at correct scale, not to mention the Choctaw is full hull. This model isn't intended for beginners, but anyone with experience working with multi-media ships should have no problems. If you want correct era 3D printed figures to go on your Choctaw to add some life, we can help with those as well. For all the info., check out the Flagship Models web site.
    3 points
  21. I built this several years ago and it included my crude and 1st attempt at a base diorama.
    3 points
  22. Hi, In this diorama, I tried to portray the battle of Hue City scene of Stanley Kubrick's cult movie "FULL METAL JACKET". First of all i apologize for my bad english. Scale 1/35 M41 Walker Bulldog Tamiya 35055 Figures US Armoured Troops Tamiya MM217 Hope you like it.
    3 points
  23. This is the Eduard 1:72 Albatros D.Va, finished at Lt. Walter Wolf's Jasta 5 plane from June-August 1917. The kit is OK but it's 20 years old and is missing some details (tachometer and gun mounts in the cockpit, radiator inflow and outflow pipes, etc.). I dressed up the details a bit and then used Print Scale's decals sheets (separate ones for the individual markings and for the Bavarian pattern). If you've ever hung wallpaper, you have a leg up with that Bavarian pattern - not fun applying it across a compound curve, and the entire Albatros D.V fuselage is a compound curve! It's rigged with .1mm nickel-silver "rod" from Albion Alloys, and features some Cooper Details wheels and Mini World Spandaus (although darned if you can see 'em in there!). An article will be in the Journal at some point.
    3 points
  24. I wanted to post progress photos of my build of the Tamiya 1/32 Mosquito. It would be great to read comments on how I can improve. Several photos were posted in the “techniques“ forum where i received very productive comments and i have put an aircraft weathering how-to book and some weathering products on my wishlist for Xmas. There is a specific issue that i wanted to discuss (although there is nothing i can do about it now). The wheel/tire assembly consisted of many pieces in order to mimic the flat spot at ground contact. I took great care in putting all of it together. However, when I mounted the nacelle to the wing/fuselage, i was very disappointed to find out that the flat spot on the tire is not flush with the surface. You have to get down and close to see it but there is definitely a triangle of light that shouldn’t be there. If anyone out there built this model i would love to hear wether you also had any issue with this detail? thanks for looking! Stuart
    3 points
  25. Today, it was back to work on the Camel. First priority, clean up the seam gap on top of the fuselage Add some strip styrene shims sand smooth and paint... I also test fitted the cowling and guns... more in a couple of days
    3 points
  26. For my next build I will be taking on the 1/48 Airfix Junkers JU-87B-1 Stuka. This was a World War II dive bomber use by Germany. I am not using the scheme in the kit. Instead the scheme will be that of the Staffelkapitan, 4th Staffel, Stukageshwader 77. It represents how it looked in June 1940 in France. I purchased the Eduard “Big ED” photo etch detail set (#49166) and will also be scratch building some other details. Starting with the cockpit I added the photo etch details to the ammunition cartridges. Then I detailed the seat with the photo etch seat belts. The cockpit floor required some putty as the ejector points were a little on the deep side. Once filled and sanded it was painted using Vallejo RM2 gray. The spent ammo casing bin was assembled and a photo etch cover was added. I added the ammunition cartridges to the mount and the put the bin, ammo, and seat into the weathered cockpit. I am working on the cockpit walls. Again these have a lot of ejector marks which required putty to fill. The cockpit parts have very good details although it is kind of a shame that there is a lot of ejector marks. You can see photos and details of the start in my build log at https://davidsscalemodels.com/build-log/1-48-ju-87b-1-stuka/
    3 points
  27. "Kuklinski's Principle of Appearance: A half-built scratch built kit impresses people with your skill; a completed scratch built kit looks just like any other model." I have included a picture of my in-progress scratch built 1/25 scale FWD P-2 crash fire truck. I have been working on this since March, 2020. The body is more of less complete, except for the battery compartment (the opening on the lower, center of the body). Everything is pretty much scratch built. It's about 16 inches long, 5 inches high and about 4 1/2 inches wide. The tires are resin from American Industrial Truck Models, and some parts from the AMT American LaFrance pumper kit (mainly just the seats). The next "adventure" is building the transmission, steering, and engine assemblies. I have more pictures but I can't seem to download them. I have a question for you folks: I need to scratch built two "straight six cylnder" gas engines. Any suggestions on where these can be found, or modified? I may have to scratch build these too.
    3 points
  28. I was out of town and away from my bench on Tuesday and Wednesday so no progress then. But yesterday I finally got the fuselage assembled. and unfortunately despite all the test fitting and sanding, I still have a bit of a gap behind the cockpit from the added fuel tank. But that should not be too difficult to fill. And what can be seen of all the added detail inside up front... Also I did a bit of grinding with my Dremel to thin outbthe cowling edges Next up... seam filling and clean up...
    3 points
  29. Today’s progress report: So today I completed my intended goals for yesterday. I added instrument decals to the IP, RAF WWII type, rather than the WWI type that I had planned to use but were invisible because they needed to be applied over a white background. Then I drybrushed and touched up the seat And lastly, I touched up the inside colors. Next session I can install all the interior parts and close it all up.
    3 points
  30. One small update from yesterday’s work: I forgot to get a better shot to show the sidewall wood grain effort and now that the oil wash on the engine has dried and I do not need to worry about it staining my photo booth, here’s a photo of the engine
    3 points
  31. There's one other lesson I've learned over the years about buying model kits...... My very first Nats was in Atlanta in 1978. I didn't even know they had a vendors area and sold models! Talk about the gates of heaven opening up for me..... Anyway, I found a 1/48 Aurora SBC Helldiver...at that time the ONLY game in town for that subject in 1/48, AND Aurora was "out of production". The guy wanted EIGHT DOLLARS for it!! Now remember, this is 1978....you could still occasionally find Aurora stuff on the shelves in old hardware stores and dime stores for their original prices of anywhere from $.75 to $2.00....so NO WAY was I gonna fork over $8 for a kit I might find on the shelf for $2! Long story short....2yrs later I paid $15 dollars for it! And THUS LEARNED THE LESSON: If you WANT a kit, buy it at the best price you can WHEN you find it! You may find a better bargain later, but maybe not. It may be re-released or a newer/better one may be put out, but maybe not. More importantly, most of those "holy grail" kits only get MORE expensive as you try to wait for the cheaper/newer alternative! Gil
    3 points
  32. Hah! Preposterous. Nothing is too expensive... As long as my wife doesn't find out. Actually, I like the way Pete frames his answer around relativity. Between a large stash, lots of reference material and aftermarket "stuff", I'm sure I've spent "too much". But my hobbies before modeling were drag racing, muscle cars (primarily 67-68 Camaros) and building (and rebuilding) race engines, transmissions and rear ends...and all the associated tools and space. When kids started to come along (4), I had to change hobbies. So the expense of modeling in (mostly) 1/35th scale, relative to my former hobby, really seems like a drop in the bucket to me. Plus, the time I spend modeling, takes away from my time to spend on other expensive hobbies. Like golf...or gambling. Hmmm. Where's that next Nationals? Tony.
    3 points
  33. Last night I began construction. Actually though it was mostly just paint work. First I took a razor saw along the seat to give it some texture to suggest that of the wicker seats actually used. Once painted and with a wash it should look more the part. Then I painted up other cockpit components, and the interior of the fuselage halves. Just getting the base colors on for now. I’m not gonna use the kit pilot, so behind the seat is a glaring empty space. I searched thru my spares/salvaged parts and came up with a fuel tank to fill the void. It somewhat resembles the real thing. I’m not going for 100% accuracy, just stuff to suggest what should be there. I’m sure that must sound like blasphemy to some modelers. I’ll get to work on detail painting and washes over the next few days, plus whatever mods I intend to scratch up for the cockpit.
    3 points
  34. This is the last aircraft model that I started and completed a few months back. It’s the old Monogram A-7B. I did a few add ons in the cockpit, and changed out some of the kit ordnance using Hasegawa items based off of photos that I found online. Markings are from a couple decal sheets that I cobbled together to build a VA-95 bird off USS Midway during Operation Linebacker in Spring and Summer of 1972.
    3 points
  35. The new 1/72 Airfix Gladiator is a real sweetheart of a kit. No flash and any mold seams are slight and easily dealt with. Fit is as with all new Airfix kits, precise to the point that you need to be very careful during clean up not to remove too much anywhere before checking. I did mine OOTB with the exception of using the S.B.S. rigging wire set. (#72046). It gives you a complete set of rigging all pre-made to the correct lengths. You do, however, need to pre-drill holes to receive the wires, so advanced planning is necessary. As they are made in a silver metal, I painted mine a darker metallic color before cutting them from the fret. Almost all the wires fit spot on, but a few needed a slight bit of tweaking, probably due more to my assembly technique than any error on their part. The only thing missing is the antennae. It would have been nice to get that as well, but it's either easily made or can be omitted entirely from some versions on the a/c. I did mine in the camo of the Swedish volunteer unit that flew for the Finns during their war with Russia. (P.S. Notice how I forgot to remove one of the pieces of masking from the left rear of the canopy. What a twit. Problem has since been solved.)
    3 points
  36. Ya know...that's really ALL you had to say. But thanks for the diatribe, bud.
    2 points
  37. The sarcophagus was a lot of fun Dave
    2 points
  38. Thank you Gil. I built four vintage Me262 kits together, Matchbox, FROG, Heller and Hasegawa. Here they are. From top to bottom: Hasegawa, Heller, FROG and Matchbox.
    2 points
  39. LOL! Thanks Gil! Yeah, I don't know how accurate they are too, but boy do they make that bus look great! It's another weekend and time to open the manufacturing plant for another tour to show the latest progress Thanks to Hobby Day, I was able to get a lot done. First things first, let's visit the hanger where I managed to finally sand the nose of the A-400 into something resembling "close enough": The shape is still a bit off, but it seems beyond my capabilities to get right. It can only really be seen from certain angles. Screw it! I'm tired of messing with this thing, especially after all this time. I'm gonna repair the wheels, prime the nose and move on. I also decided to take someone's advice to mask off and paint the blue stripes going down the side of the An-124. So, I gritted my teeth and started taping; making every effort to make these straight: After that, out came the Sotar 20/20 which I used to lay down the first thin stripe. Getting the point right at the rear was extremely difficult and I doubt I'll be able to make it look good. But the first stripe is down: I've been too scared to pull off the tape to see how badly I did. I'm already pretty disheartened by this model already Before I did that, I re-glued the two broken engines back on the wing: Man, what an ordeal! I'll check the stripes later this week and then try to mask and shoot the bigger one above that one. Time to check out the tank assembly plant now.... Moving on, I managed to get a bit of extra work done on the 1/35th scale Patton. First, I assembled the searchlight: You can see I did a bit of sanding to try and make that thing look right. Man, that is one extremely fiddly assembly! Installing it on the tank is gonna be even more difficult! After that I wanted to do something that would make me feel good about this tank. I added the tracks and installed all the final roadwheels: Yeah, I'm actually liking this thing now! And now for the next project I started for my SoCal AMPS 20-hour build challenge. This is the Russian CLUB M coastal defense missile system, which I got from a fellow AMPS member for my birthday. I was allowed to work on it over the course of the next four hours. First thing I did, build the transmissions and drive trains, as well as the center differential so that I could assemble the chassis: After that I assembled and added the engine: Next I built the floor of the rear missile compartment. Here it is dry-fit on the chassis. You can see I added the floor of the driver's cab already too: After that, I decided to assemble all the missile launch tubes ahead of time: You can see one needed a little persuasion. After I did those, I saw I had one hour left for this build for the day. Out came the parts for the suspension. I built all the axle assemblies and added them all to the chassis along with the gas tanks: Now, we'll check in on the WWI female tank. This one got the decals on it and some dusting. It's not done yet, despite looking so close. I expect this will be in the completed models section soon: Now we move on to the Israeli Nagmasho't. Ace has you bend four tiny pieces of P/E into ammunition box holders for the four machine guns on this. I'm so thrilled I had my Hold-n-Fold: You can see the Exacto Blade in the pic for size reference. Man, I'm glad that got done! I glued each corner joint with Gator's Grip Glue. Since I was doing photo etch on this, I added the final parts to the model: Once they were dry, I added the decals: While the photo etch was drying on the Nagmasho't, I continued to work on the Sho't Meteor tank. First I completed the details on the hull: Next I started adding the details to the turret to bring it closer to finishing: Here they both are mocked up with all the details I added: Next came all the photo etch. First I did the turret; I needed to bend all the vision block shields and add them to the turret. Later I added the remaining parts to the turret and hull: Later I added the hatch ring to the commanders hatch over the top of all those vision blocks: Now this is so much closer to being finished. I should be able to paint this within the week. Finally, I got tired of the M-41 taking up space. I pulled it out and added the fenders, the photo etch braces and the fender boxes to this: Next I did final bits to the turret. This is getting closer to paint, but I still have so much more to do with it. I did add the idler wheels and the rear halves of the roadwheels to the suspension but didn't take any pics. Too much frustration with the roadwheels not lining up at all. Maybe you'll see that in the next tour. That completes the latest tour of Maddog Manufacturing, I hope you enjoyed it. Thanks all for looking in, comments are welcome.
    2 points
  40. Awhile back, a friend of mine on another site proposed to do a buddy build with me of a pair of WWI Dogfight opponents. He wanted to build a Fokker Dr.I. So my entry into this buddy build is a Sopwith Camel. It only seems natural to oppose the Fokker Dr.I when he first proposed this buddy build of duelist biplanes awhile back. I have had the old Monogram issue of the classic Aurora kit in my stash and had been pondering building it for awhile. My friend’s idea of a buddy build was the kick in the pants needed to get this one from an abstract concept into something of an actual plan. The next step was to get other projects wrapped up so that I could give this build the attention that it deserves. I had the kit and a set of decals Off of the decal set I selected this particular subject aircraft. With a new year, and now all previous builds on my bench wrapped up, it was time to start.
    2 points
  41. Finished my 1/48 Monogram B-24J "Dragon and His Tail" this evening. I used Kit Worlds decals, and unfortunately, they caused me several headaches! The first, and worst problem was they tended to curl under the edges as you removed the backing paper. Luckily, they are a little thick and I was able to use a knife tip to save the big ones. However, the thin wavy tail curled up into a tube and "died"! So, I had to paint the flowing tail part, from just forward of the waist window on back. That said, once the decals were on they did suck down on the surfaces pretty well. Thankfully, I'd decided to paint the rudder and fin stripes, and only had to use the plane numbers from the decal sheet, which also gave me the same problems. The 2nd problem is that the decal is at least 10% TOO BIG. Even compared to the image on the directions you can see it's too tall when applied, and way too long. If the tail decal hadn't become useless, I'd have had to trim at least an inch at the back and it would've been running into the horizontal tails, which it shouldn't. The kit itself is OOTB, except for using a Squadron vac main canopy. The NMF is a combination of Tamiya spray can for most of the model with Alclad Aluminum for the dissimilar panels, all of it over Alclad Gloss Black Primer. This was a tribute build to an artist friend of mine, Warren Kirbo, who built and PAINTED this scheme on his Monogram B-24J back in the mid 70s. This pic shows where the Dragon lost its tail.... And this one shows the completed artwork after painting the flowing tail section.... Questions, comments, and critiques welcome, as always! Gil
    2 points
  42. Greetings, The launch of event pre-registration has been rescheduled February 1st to April 1st, 2021 to allow for the continued stabilization of the Covid-19 situation. We feel this postponement will allow for a greater confidence in those planning to attend The Very Best of the West National Convention. Convention planning continues to progress ahead of schedule, vendor table sales continue to be brisk with less than 30 tables (out of 320) left for sale, room reservations continue to come in and as of this date far exceed our original expectations (of 1,600 room nights) for a total of 2,889 room nights. The Rio Resort & Convention Center has re-opened and reports that no changes have been made by the State of Nevada in regard to convention room attendance restriction regulations. Considering the massive size of our convention space we do not think this will be an issue in the future. We thank everyone for their patience and look forward to seeing you all in August 2021. From the entire Las Vegas Nats Team we wish you all a Happy and Healthy New Year. Bob Lomassaro, 2021 LV Nats Chairman
    2 points
  43. 2020 1. 1-10-2020 Israeli Skyhawk 2.2-22-2020 B-25 Wolf Wagon 3.3-21-2020 P-51H PA_Ang 4.4-7-2020 PA ANG A7D 5.04-22-2020 303Sq Spitfire MkV 6.04-25-2020 FW 190D-9 7.05-10-2020 C-46 Yost Pilot 8.5-15-2020 Israeli Mystere 9. 06-04-2020 Hartmanns F-86 10. 06-24-2020 A-10C D-Day Anniv. 11. 07-20-2020 VMA-211 Red tail 12. 07-23-2020 2011 Tiger Tornado 13. 07-27-2020 Albatros D.III OEFFAG 14. 08-11-2020 303 Sq Hurricane B.O.B. 15. 09-19-2020 Leduc 022 16. 10-11-2020 Bf 110 Battle of Britain 17. 11-09-2020 P-40 Lt Welch Pearl Harbor 18. 11-18-2020 Victory 357 19. 12-18-2020 F4U-5 Corsair Thanks for Looking Lets Go 2021...VIVA LAS VEGAS Bill
    2 points
  44. !/12th Tamiya Yoshimura Hayabusa X-1 motorcycle with the Coree figure modified to fit. Dak
    2 points
  45. Just finished the 1/48 High Planes edition of the Conquest Conversion F8F Bearcat that raced at Reno in the 60s. This is a limited run, low pressure injection kit. That means the plastic needs a lot of clean up, there's no locating pins, and the detail parts have to be sanded (or ground down) to get them to fit well. While it takes a lot more elbow grease to build such a kit, it captures the modifications to the racing Bearcat very well with the shorter wings, extended tail, small racing canopy, closed off wing intakes (filled in by the builder, that is), and P-51 prop spinner. The attraction to the model is the scheme and the markings. The paint scheme itself isn't too difficult, and decals are provided for the "trim". I chose to paint the trim as most decals like that don't fit well, and getting them to blend smoothly around such compound curves is more work than masking and painting. The only catch to painting the trim was having to mix the blue to match the decal sheet. I mixed some MM Medium Blue, Cobalt Blue, and Testors Sky Blue using Mk1 eyeball, and it's close enough for government work.....MM Gloss White was used for the rest of the plane, with copious amounts of Future for the glossy finish. The racing markings themselves are very nicely printed and alternates are provided for doing Smirnoff from different years. They're thin, but not too hard to use with care. The main problem I had was with the CLEAR areas between and around the lettering and trim colors. After being applied to the model, it wanted to come apart. The decals behaved as if the ink was the only thing holding the backing sheet together, and I ended up removing as much of the clear as possible on the model. However, I do think that the decal sheet was weakend by age, and the problems I had were mainly due to that. This kit came out 20-30yrs ago, and I'm betting those decals would have performed better if built back at that time. In the end, this is just an average build (contest-wise) with quite a few gaffs when you get up close. However, it makes for a very pretty build to sit on the shelf, and compliments my Gulfhawk Bearcat quite nicely. Comments, criticism, and questions welcome, as always....Cheers! Gil
    2 points
  46. No no Squadron's not dead, it's, it's restin'!
    2 points
  47. Thanks for the heads up Gil. Looking that the new tool Eduard and Roden kits in my stash, I know exactly what you speak of. I have plenty of model building experience. But none on new tool biplanes, and aside from one a few years ago, it’s been decades since I’ve built old biplane kits like this one. I training up to the new ones. Lol! Ive seen the Wingnuts Wings kits. They are gorgeous. But also outside of my preferred scales, build areas, and price range.
    2 points
  48. I'm seeing varying posts, but no definite answer. The last post I saw said "change of ownership"....but who knows what that means, even if it's true? They had a %70 off sale last week, which is probably why the warehouse is empty. The problem now is how do they start back up IF there is a new owner and wants "Squadron" to continue"? The brand had lost so much of it's shine and reputation over the last 10yrs due to slip-shod service that I'm not sure the name has any value anymore. There was a time when both their brick&mortar stores and their mail order were THE place to go to if you possibly could. But that was when it was run by the hobbyists who started the business. The "business types" who took over the purely mail order Squadron didn't have a clue as how to satisfy us, and ran it into the bankruptcy of today. It probably IS the end of an era.....but as they taught us in physics....the ONLY constant in the universe IS change! Gil
    2 points
  49. Bob, this is the Monogram issue of the kit. It was originally an Aurora mold that Monogram acquired when Aurora folded. Monogram retooled the molds a bit, adding wheel wells, a cockpit, and some other goodies, like they also did with the F-111. I built the Aurora A-7 long ago, but it was given to my kids to play with once they came along years later. Good diversion to keep them from playing with dad’s then recent and current builds... Thats too funny about an Aurora category at contests. Might as well add Lindberg there too... 🤣
    2 points
  50. Let there be light! This week’s work on the Thunderbolt II is installing the aircraft lights. Starting with the navigation lights there are five locations. The locations are the aft of the fuselage, each side of the tails, the dorsal light and the belly light. The kit provides a clear lens for the tail which is 1mm in diameter. So to start I drilled a 1mm hole all the way into the fuselage cavity. The clear lens was placed and then a 1mm fiber optic line was placed against it. For the belly light a 1mm hole was drilled and a piece of styrene stock was added to provide strain relief. I then used a lighter and slightly melted the end of the 1 mm fiber optic line to create a “lens” and installed it. The tails and the dorsal spots were drilled with a .5mm drill and like the belly I used a lighter to slightly melt the end of each .5mm fiber optic line. I then made a light box out of styrene and installed a 3mm LED on one end and then drilled two 1mm holes and three .5mm holes for the fiber optic lines. All the fiber optic lines were then routed and attached using acrylic gel to hold them in place. To power the lighting I took the 1/48 Hasegawa cart and built it up. The problem I had was the interior of the cart held the battery but there was not enough room for the connector to the battery. To correct the fit I added some .2” thick styrene to the one end and some thin stock styrene to extend the edge of the top cover. A 3.5mm hole for the power cable was drilled out on the aircraft power spot. I used a coax wire sleeved with black shrink tubing as the power cable. One end was routed to the battery connector and the other side I installed a female coaxial pin. On the aircraft next to the nose gear bay is the aircraft ground power port. I cut out the panel (will make one later in the open position) and installed a male coaxial connector on a thick styrene sheet with epoxy and glued it into place. The cover of the cart will not be glued down which will allow access to change the battery if needed. I used the photo etch detail parts to build up the nose gear bay and then started work on the nose gear strut. The A-10 has two lights on the strut. There is a lower light for taxi and the upper light for landing. Using styrene rod I made both light housings. I installed a white PICO sized LED in each one and made the lens using acrylic gel. So not only does it create the lens it holds the LED’s in place. I am now starting on the red and green wing tip lights which will use individual LED’s and fiber optic lines. You can see more photos and details from the start in my build log at https://davidsscalemodels.com/build-log/1-48-a-10-thunderbolt-ii-dcs/
    2 points
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