Jump to content

All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Past hour
  2. This week’s update covers the final assembly as well as the completed build of the Buffalo representing VS-102. The fuselage was assembled and detailed. The prop was assembled and painted and the light gray was base coated. I applied the decals which were not bad. A little thicker than I like but they laid down and conformed to the surface well. The canopy was polished and painted as well as the underside windows. And this is negative side of this kit. The windows on the belly are a very poor fit. I filled the gaps with styrene which makes it less noticeable but once the gaps were filled it still sits a little under the surface of the fuselage. Finally I added the antenna wire using EZ line fine. The large spinner for the prop does limit the engine details a little but I am happy with the overall aircraft. This kit was a nice kit to work with the exception of the underside windows. Due to its small size the build moves quickly, especially with the current situation. Thanks for following along. See all the detail from start to finish at https://davidsscalemodels.com/build-log/1-48-brewster-buffalo-vs-102/
  3. Today
  4. I recently bought a stand alone shelving system but have not yet located a source of optically clear, lightweight acrylic for cutting and fitting as dust protection. I am currently checking what modular LED lighting is available for illumination. I have seen very nice , clear acrylic recently installed in store checkout isles during the Covid-19 panic; wish I knew who makes the sheet plastic.
  5. Nice work on that old kit; evokes some good memories of building Aurora kits. Thanks for posting the photos.
  6. WildBill, overall, it fit fine. The plug for the ventral turret was the trickiest because you had to be vey precise in cutting the kit parts so the conversion parts would fit. The nose and tail were just straight cuts along a panel line.
  7. I started this just after my daughter was born. It was fraught by so many frustrations she's six now (and she herself nearly totaled the model just after painting started!). All the gory details will be in the Journal at some point. This is a historic plane - the first mount of Sergey Kramerenko, the first pilot to score five victories over enemy jets (so, the first jet ace).
  8. Mister300

    1/72 ZM Ho 229

    Got my diorama base from Coastal Kits in GB. Looks great.
  9. Yesterday
  10. This is a real not-so-golden-oldie. The original kit dates from the early 50's, but this is the Atlantis re-release. It's not up to the standard of their M-46, but it's a fun build. Forget accuracy. Other than getting the general shapes correct, all the detail is missing and/or wrong. However, in their defense, they did not exactly have access to detailed drawings and photos at the time, only blurry images taken by military attaches at parades. The Russians never used the Stalin III in its intended role. Closest it got was its use on the Chinese frontier as a dug in pill box. Shortly after the war, it morphed into the T-10 and then the T-10M. It did scare NATO into developing the British Conqueror and the US M-103 to counter it. It was used in action in the Near East and in the Indo-Pakistani wars. This is it OOTB with the exception of replacing the grab handles on the turret as they are such a prominent feature and I also added the retainer straps, end handles and filler caps on the fuel tanks as they were pretty bland without them. The track sag is not an attempt at realism, but rather was needed as the tracks are too long, so I had to take up the slack somehow.
  11. I'm working on P-40 #68 of Charles Holder. The few photos I find don't clearly show the antenna wire/connections on the plane. Was it the standard for P-40 of the time, i.e., behind cockpit to tail, to both wingtips? Can anyone offer guidance? Thanks.
  12. We set it up in the venders' room so that people have access to it even while judging is going on. There are usually 15-20 models for sale. They don't go for a lot, but somewhere in the $5-20 range. Last year the club made over $250. The people that buy them are usually kids, people with kids, people that just like whatever the subject is but don't/can't build, modelers that need certain parts from that subject. We make periodic announcements about it during the show to stir up interest.
  13. Review Author: Michael Novosad Casemate Publishers Ian Baxter is a military historian who specializes in German twentieth-century military history. He has written more than forty books and over 100 articles about the World War II era. He has reviewed numerous military studies for publication and supplied thousands of photographs and important documents to various publishers and film production companies worldwide. The Author is an avid collector of WW2 photographs. His previous books in this Series include Hitler's Boy Soldiers, Nazi Concentration Camp Commandants, German Army on the Eastern Front - The Advance, German Army on the Eastern Front - The Retreat, The Crushing of Army Group (North), and the SS Waffen Division series including SS Leibstandarte Division and SS Totenkopf Division At War. He lives near Chelmsford, Essex. The Publication (from the website). This highly illustrated record reveals in detail the largest tank battle of World War Two, the battle of Kursk. In the summer of 1943, the German-launched Operation Zitadelle (Citadel), aimed at cutting off a large number of Soviet forces in the Kursk salient. This offensive resulted in the battle of Kursk, the largest tank battle of World War II. Kursk quickly became a fierce contest of attrition, as Wehrmacht and elite Waffen-SS Panzer-Divisions with their powerful Tiger and Panther tanks unsuccessfully tried to hammer their way through the intricate lines of strong Soviet defensive positions. What followed was unabated fighting for two weeks as German units were slowly and systematically ground down in a series of brutal armored battles. During this ferocious fighting the Red Army savagely contested every foot of ground, finally ending German invincibility forever. For the first time in its short history, the blitzkrieg concept had failed. The reverberations caused by the defeat at Kursk were immense, and never again did the German war machine go on the offensive in the East. Stiff defensive action was now the stratagem placed upon the dwindling Panzerwaffe right to the gates of Berlin. With comprehensive captions and text, Kursk 1943 tells the story of this dramatic battle using rare and unpublished photographs, maps, and highly detailed artist profiles. The book reveals the events leading up to the battle in the first half of 1943, and the buildup of forces by both sides before their climatic showdown at Kursk. Contents Timeline of Events This two-page chapter offers the chronology of events from May until July 15, 1943. The German plan was to pinch off the Kursk Salient, surrounding the five Soviet armies and destroying them. The Russians used May and June to prepare their massive defenses, while the Germans planned and trained their forces for the attack. The July 5 start of the German attack is quickly bogged down by minefields, strong resistance, and mechanical breakdowns of equipment. After 10 days of grueling battles the Germans are on the defensive and began their withdrawal. Day-by-day this was a monumental battle of historical significance. A major turning point in the war. Prelude to Disaster The battle of Kursk became the largest tank battle of World War II. The Soviet Army contested every foot of ground to end the myth of German invincibility once and for all, and they were successful. This chapter addresses the earlier battle of Stalingrad and its effects of the opposing forces. The Russians were determined to drive the Germans from Ukraine forever. The German defense was tenacious, resulting in few gains by the Russians. Eventually the Russian offensive bogged down forming the Kursk salient. The Opposing Forces Here the author discusses the condition of the German army in early 1943, the small arms weapons used, with much of this section dedicated to the discussion of the various uniforms provided to the soldiers, tankers, and other armored crews. Soviet Preparations for Battle The Russians had information on the planned German Kursk offensive from various spy sources and began their in-depth defensive preparations. With this information in hand the Russians prepared the largest concentration of strength ever seen on the Eastern front. This section offers information on the Soviet soldiers' weapons and uniforms. German Preparations for Battle The Germans had 780.000 troops for the offensive. Included were 10,000 vehicles and mortars, and 2,900 tanks prepared for battle. The un-proven Panther tank was to be used for the first time in this action. Several excellent images of troops and vehicles in preparation are included herein. Army Group Center This group consisted of 335,000 troops, supported by 45 Tigers and 83 Ferdinand tank destroyers. Images and background of the various German commanders is covered here. The battle begins here and it is of monumental proportions. Both sides throw all of their might into the action. There is not great detail provided for the battle, but rather a broad overview of what happened. Army Group South This section details the operations of Army Group South. It becomes a major battle of attrition for both sides. The Germans were just worn down by the Russian defenses. Major losses occurred on both sides. The German offensive is ground to a halt. Aftermath The Soviets had become a juggernaut the Germans could not hold back. This is the beginning of the end for German major offensive operations in the East. They are on the defensive from here on out. The losses on both sides were monumental. While the Russians seemed to have an endless supply of manpower and weapons, the Germans were hard-pressed to replace their losses. Further Reading Several resources for additional reading are included here. Conclusion This book is historically informative. The many images bring home the preparation and the consequences of this battle. Blitzkrieg has failed. Modelers of German and Russian military vehicles will find the many images of the vehicles and troops involved beneficial. Tigers, Panthers, Pz.Kpfw Mk IV, Marders, Ferdinands, and T-34's are included in the black-and -white images, as well as the color plates. Lots of details can be seen in the pictures. The author also included a narrative for each picture that addresses many details that may not immediately be noticed by the reader. This publication is highly recommended for the Military history buff. My thanks to Casemate Publications and IMPS/USA for the opportunity to review this publication. Well worth the time to read every line. View the full article
  14. Last week
  15. regardless of the method of presentation, the magazine requires being "made". I think the other obstacles are an excuse for that not being done. even the ardent supporters lament coverage of 2 year old contests. sometimes it's just "time", ya know? it doesn't always equate with what we want, but denial can only go so far. reality always wins. used to work with a fellow who told the story of "Thought". Thought was brought up on the gallows. Thought didn't think he was going to be hung. but he was.
  16. Hello! You can still see the pictures in my original post in our club site, click here: https://www.ipmsborinqueneers.com/apps/forums/topics/show/12909802-tamiya-1-35-horch1a-with-2cm-flak38
  17. Looking for a 1/144th B-36 model kit, preferably a later variant. Partially built models and generally intact, derelict hulks OK, too. Gotta be 144th scale, however. That 1/185 retro-Revell kit won't do. Anybody wanna get rid of one? Whatchya build? Maybe we can trade somethin'. Yeah, those Hobbycraft kits came & went and I just...didn't...grab...one... Thanx for looking.
  18. Ha - I like this idea! The Andromeda Strain notwithstanding, how does that usually go for your club? How many typically for auction? Who buys them?
  19. Aw crap - just saw this. Very sad news. Prayers and condolences to Mike's family & friends.
  20. Review Author: Rod Lees Master Model IPMS/USA sends warm regards once again to Piotr at Master Model for supporting the IPMS USA reviewer corps with yet one more of his masterful (!) Turned metal releases, which have become a gold-standard for many of us who do a lot of model building. And thanks to IPMS leadership for sending it to me to be reviewed. I am constantly amazed at what comes out of Piotr's shop... sure, some of us can cut brass tubing with the best.. but the machine work on the MG 151 cannon, the "Through the engine crankshaft centerline cannon, the pitot tube, and the very delicate IFF (Identification Friend or Foe) FuG 25 antenna always has me wondering how. Then again we live in an age of metalworking (and other material) magic. Certainly this set fits a niche that is difficult to otherwise fill. Containing the five aforementioned metal parts, this set is worth investing in for the realism and delicacy (Not to mention the strength and resiliency) of brass for our models. If you own any of the HK models, I highly recommend this set be acquired, as it adds just that special touch to the final product. Primer, paint black for the cannon and silver/camo for the pitot and antenna, drill the holes in the required locations and add as a final step, and be done. My usual admonition to "Watch your eyes and fingers" apply to these strengthened items... I wish these were around when I built the pre-release HK DO-335A review item (Without instructions, mind you... for IPMS back in 2014... has it been that long? Woah... ) Thanks again to Piotr for providing us the set, and John and Phil to forwarding for review. View the full article
  21. Review Author: Rod Lees Master Model IPMS/USA yet again sends regards to Piotr at Master Model for supporting the IPMS USA reviewer corps with yet one more of his turned metal and resin accessory releases, which are the gold-standard for those who do a lot of model building. And thanks to IPMS leadership for sending it to me to be reviewed. This set takes the ante up on the previously reviewed AM-32-107 set... included in the -108 version is the brass machine work on the two MG 151 cannon, the very delicate pitot tube and IFF (Identification Friend or Foe) FuG 25 antenna, and also the MG-103 cannon in brass, as well as a brass blast tube for the centerline "through the engine shaft" cannon; more jewels appear in the form of what appears to be CAD machine-printed resin muzzle brakes for the MG-103. The detail on the muzzle brakes is absolutely astounding, and having built several Master model sets with resin, I can account for the delicate but strong nature of the resin. The blast vents on the brake are astounding in their detail, and these have to be seen to be believed. Not something I can carve out of resin or other material myself, I have to think this is the ultimate technology for our future model parts. Whether or not it can be affordable as a full-up model is a discussion for another time or place... Then again we live in a age of metalworking (and other material) magic. Certainly this set fits a niche that is difficult to otherwise fill. Containing the seven aforementioned metal and two resin parts, this set is worth investing in for the realism and delicacy (Not to mention the strength and resiliency) of brass and the impressive appearance and delicacy of resin for our models. If you own any of the HK DO-335 models, I highly recommend this set be acquired, as it adds just that special touch to the final product. Primer, paint black for the cannon and silver/camo for the pitot and antenna, drill the holes in the required locations and add as a final step, and be done. Master makes available for sale a blackening agent to finish these barrels, but I have not used it as I use other etching methods for brass that seems to work. In a pinch, black metal primer spray also works, and polishes out nicely to a semi-gloss metallic gun-like sheen. My usual admonition to "be careful with your eyes and fingers" apply to these strengthened items... Again, thanks to Piotr at Master for providing us the set, and John and Phil to forwarding for review. View the full article
  22. Review Author: Rod Lees Twobobs Aviation Graphics IPMS USA gratefully acknowledges the continued support from Bob at Two Bobs Aviation Graphics... Recommended Kits Tamiya's F-15E; the later release is recommended, due to minor changes in weapons load And to make sure your Mudhen is fully upgraded, I recommend the GT Resin range available from Sprue Brothers models for intakes, wheels, and exhausts. Two Mikes also produces an excellent set of 1/32 F-15 Engine featherless exhausts. If you are feeling particularly extravagant and must have the best, the HK range of 1/32 F-15 exhausts has been beautifully 3-D printed as well, and is heartily recommended. Order these directly or you can pay a distributor here in the States to do the leg work. The review item is the typical high standard and normal from Two Bobs; I have a special place in the heart for Lakenheath subjects, as the F-111F's there used to attack us at RAF Mildenhall with interdiction and other extreme low-level antics, and certainly the Mudhens and now F-35's will be doing the same. And there are few things more satisfying than waking the neighbors when "quiet hours" end. Price of freedom, old man. I don't choose the location, the enemy does. The instructions are top of the line, simple and easy. The enlarged format with clear, concise detail and placement information for the aircraft markings and stenciling is the best I've seen in the business, period. And I've struggled with the original stencil sheets from other companies in the old days, so... The Stars of this sheet are the "nose art" items and unit markings... LN has a long combat history, and the "Statue De La Liberte " wing carries this tradition. I understand the Tigers sheet is next up, so we'll see what the "don't offend anyone while we are killing them" crowd restricts us to on that sheet. The theme of the 494th "Panthers" is toward 'toon and movie characters with bad attitudes and baddass results, and subjects like "Ravage" and "Bulls Eye" are particularly detailed. The 2-OH-40oz is a red-tail character of the P-51's, and a nod to their excellence. "Lady Liberty and "Texas Ranger" are also well done... and some of the other movie and TV themes are also addressed. All in register , all produced with the Proven excellence of the Cartograph decal company of Italy. This Decal sheet is a perfect example of our choices and the expanding resources in the industry, and I look forward to more releases from Bob and crew in the future. As an old Maintainer himself, he knows what is correct and is produces one of the finest products out there! Thanks again to TwoBobs for making the decals and providing IPMS/USA with a review sample. View the full article
  23. Review Author: Rod Lees Brengun IPMS/USA says "thanks kindly" to Brengun for supporting the IPMS USA reviewer corps with yet one more of their growing number of releases, with useful additions for those who build. And thanks to IPMS leadership for sending it to me to be reviewed. This set has four parts... two nose gear and two main gear wheels and tires. Cast in medium gray resin, they provide a professional final touch for those of us who frequent the Lilliputian scale of 1/144. There are no instructions, nor are any needed if you are using them. Clean the resin with your own mold release agent remover, paint with flat black primer, then use a touch of flat white on a 00000 brush or a toothpick... followed by a gloss on the wheel, so a bit of weathering dark gray or black pin wash can be used to bring out the detail. What amazes me most about this set are the wheel details, including brake pad assemblies for the rear of the wheels, and cooling holes for the brake system on the forward wheel face. Past my ability to manufacture, it's an amazing bit of art and wizardry. Brengun appears to have the 1/144 scale aftermarket details firmly in hand, and we appreciate Brenguns' owners for supporting us... thanks to them and Phil and John for sending Bregun stuff my way...! View the full article
  24. Review Author: Rod Lees Brengun IPMS/USA says "thanks kindly" to Brengun for supporting the IPMS USA reviewer corps with yet one more of their growing number of releases, with useful additions for those who build. And thanks to IPMS leadership for sending it to me to be reviewed. This set has 10 parts... One nose gear wheel and tire and nose gear fork, two main gear wheels and tires, and two outrigger wheels and tires all cast in resin. Also included is a small etch brass set with torque links for the outrigger gear. The resin is cast in medium gray color, and this is the ultimate provision including a professional final touch for those of us who frequent the Lilliputian scale of 1/144. There are instructions included to assist you in your task. Clean the resin with your own mold release agent remover, paint with flat black primer, then use a touch of flat white on a 00000 brush or a toothpick... followed by a gloss on the wheel, so a bit of weathering dark gray or black pin wash can be used to bring out the detail. As to the photoetch, a bit of primer spray will help with paint adhesion here as well The wheel details, including brake pad assemblies for the rear of the wheels, and cooling holes for the brake system on the forward wheel face, are amazing. The PE is also an excellent touch. Past my ability to manufacture, it's an amazing bit of art and wizardry, just waiting for an opportunity to be held by micro tweezers and plinked off into the carpet. WEAR eye protection, this stuff is tiny and has serious potential to cause damage if released with tiddly-wink precision by the modeler! Brengun appears to have the 1/144 scale aftermarket details firmly in hand, and we appreciate Brenguns' owners for supporting us... thanks to them and Phil and John for sending Brengun stuff my way...! View the full article
  25. Review Author: Jarrod Booth Italeri The Mercedes Benz Actros range of trucks was introduced in 1995 and quickly became a success hauling cargo throughout Europe and other parts of the world. Italeri is well known for their extensive range of truck models. They exhibit very nice detail and are relatively easy to build. The top opening box shows a great painting of the "show" truck. Inside it is packed full of parts sprues, "rubber" tires, mesh for behind the star, instruction manual and decal sheet. There were three parts sprues contained within two plastic bags each, while the clear parts and additional chrome plated parts were in their own separate bags. Construction started with the chassis. There were two parts to each chassis "I" frame and looked like a double bogey axel could be added/changed from the single axel in the kit. Air tanks, a battery container, engine mounts and structural cross members were assembled to form the chassis frame. The inside of the chassis frames showed numerous large ejector pin marks, but, most would be hidden. Nearly every part in this model had ejector pin marks, which is consistent with every Italeri model I have seen or built. I cleaned up those that would be most visible and left the rest. Some ejector pin marks were located on parts that were highly visible like the rear cabin wall and ceiling. Filler and sanding took care of these. Large mold seams also had to be sanded or scraped away on many parts. None of this was difficult and the nature of the plastic made removing these blemishes easy enough. The front and rear axles, suspension and shock absorbers followed and all fit together nicely. The front wheels are designed to steer. All the steering linkage arm shaft ends were melted using a heated knife after inserting them through the next linkage socket to lock them into place. The engine was a sizable model-in-itself. The end result was a convincing miniature of the six-cylinder motor seen on the real truck. Most parts fit well. The radiator attached to the chassis and the cooling fan attaches to the engine front. Hoses and pipes from the engine to the radiator completed this assembly. The engine and radiator fit perfectly into their chassis mounts and were glued in place along with the drive shaft. While still attached to their sprue, I painted the wheels Model Master enamel Chrome which gave them a nice polished Alloy appearance. The sprue attachment was right behind the rim and required careful cutting to remove the wheels without damaging the rim. The vinyl "rubber" tires were cut from their sprue. They show very nice tread pattern and some tire size numbering on the side walls. Once the wheel halves were glued together and tires installed, they look fantastic. The fuel tanks and exhaust noise reducer were assembled, painted and attached to the chassis. The cabin is nicely appointed and well detailed. Decals were used for instruments and steering wheel controls. I liked the grey color of the plastic and used black and silver to add contrasts to panel centers, dash and door trims. The walls of the cabin attach to the floor and ceiling to form an internal box. All parts fit very nicely. The sunroof was painted Tamiya Smoke. I used decals from a sheet I had for the Revell Germany version of this model that included all instrument panel controls, seat inserts and door panel speakers. All the outer cab panels, roof, mirrors and various other cab related parts were painted Model Master spray can Classic White lacquer and decaled before joining them together. The side spoilers and roof were taped to each side panels to facilitate applying the large single piece wolf head decal that extended from just behind the side windows to the rear of the spoilers. I ran a new blade along the edges to separate the spoilers, side panels and roof for later assembly after the decals had dried and clear coat applied. The Cartograf decals were a little thick, but, laid down beautifully with a little Micro-Sol. I chose to paint the cab panels separately first as they assemble along natural joints, and it was easier to add the windows afterwards without having to mask them. I sprayed the grill, wheel hubs and rear wheel mud guards with Testors enamel Dark Blue and found it was an almost perfect match to the blue decal color. The Wolf decals, grill and other items I painted blue really made the white cab "pop"! After several failed attempts to bare metal foil the prominent Mercedes star, I painted it with a Molotow Liquid Chrome pen. I decanted the paint and applied it using a soft brush. There was quite a lot of flash on the star that was delicately removed. Before joining the outer side cab walls to the internal cab "box", I painted the side window surrounds rubber black and then attached their respective windows. This was followed by the windscreen being glued into the front cab panel. The fit was very good and the mounting surfaces were adequate for glue application. The "glass" was very thin and the sprue gates quite large in places. I used a razor saw to remove each part. The clear parts were one area where much care was needed as any rough handling could damage or crack the plastic. The large sprue gates certainly added strength and protected the clear parts while on the sprue. The four cab panels and roof were carefully glued together which completed this part of the build. Take time to make sure all the walls line up so the roof sits flush all the way around. When I built Italeri's Iveco Hi-Way 40th Anniversary (https://web.ipmsusa3.org/content/iveco-hi-way-40th-anniversary), I learnt, after the fact that if the top grill panel is glued in its down position the cab won't tilt. I now have a lovely engine that can't be seen on that model! I built a hinge setup from a paper clip so I could raise the panel and be able to tilt the Mercedes cab forward. I moved onto the chrome parts, specially added to this kit. This consisted of decorative piping that ran along the bottom of the side skirts, lower chin spoiler, spotlight holder over the roof, spotlights and horns. The spotlight holder had some flash that I removed along with mold seams that were quite visible. I used bare metal foil to cover and hide my clean up. The spotlights and their individual lenses were attached and the whole assembly glued to the roof. The spotlight lenses were not clear like the rest of the clear parts. I brushed Future Floor Wax (yes, I still have the old stuff!) over them which helped. The side skirt and chin chrome parts included lights that were painted clear orange. Curiously, the large side rear vision mirrors did not include clear parts for the "glass" mirrors. However, the two small mirrors that aim down to show the driver where the front and side of the truck is to curbs, etc. do facilitate clear lenses. The previous edition of this kit included a sheet of chrome stickers that took care of all mirrors. I Bare Metal foiled all mirrors for a uniform look. All mirrors were attached to the cab using their mounting brackets. No fit issues were encountered. Numerous brackets attach the side spoilers to the rear of the cab. They all fit fine and aligned quite nicely with the roof spoiler. All the brackets had mold seam lines that needed removing to improve their fit and appearance. The air pipe that attached to the cab air conditioner was also glued to the rear of the cab. It lined up well to the pipe leading from the engine with the cab down. Two pins insert through brackets to mount the cab to the chassis. All of a sudden there was a large Mercedes Benz truck on my model bench! The blue mud guards were attached to the chassis over the rear wheels. I needed to adjust these somewhat as the inside tires rubbed. The side skirts, with their orange "position" lights and blue wolf "fur" decals, were then glued to the front and rear mud guards. The taillights slot over a raised area on the mud guards and red and yellow caution decals are located below them. To complete this Mercedes MP4, the sun visor, aerials and horns were glued in their position. Windscreen wipers, mirrors, step pads and number plates completed the build. After that, I sat back and admired my very striking Euro show truck!! It looks fantastic next to the Blue Iveco truck. I enjoyed building this rig. It went together quite well and was not overly difficult to build. It was just let down by numerous ejector pin marks in many visible areas. This truck could be built straight out of the box without paint as most parts were already the correct color. With a little care and attention to details, I have no doubt that most modelers could build a very nice rendition of this kit, painted or not. My sincere thanks to MRC-Academy, Italeri and IPMS USA for entrusting me to build and review this model. View the full article
  26. You can also purchase store showcases in knock down kit form: https://www.displays2go.com/Class/Display-Cases-1099 https://www.storesupply.com/c-495-display-cases.aspx They may look expensive, but if you factor in all the costs of building one yourself, the money isn't too bad. Cheers! Ralph
  27. I have a display case I got when a local store went belly-up. To me, the process of building is more important than the finished model, so after admiring my handiwork for a while, I need more space for a later effort. When the case gets full, I thin it out and donate the overflow to my club's local contest which has a silent auction of completed models. I get space and the club makes money. Win/Win.
  28. Review Author: Paul R. Brown SAM Publications This is an updated version of SAM Publications earlier book on the F-14 Tomcat. The book starts with a brief history of the origins of the F-14 and has separate chapters for each of the three variants of the Tomcat, the F-14A, F-14A+/B, and the ultimate Tomcat - the F-14D. Each chapter includes descriptions of each variant, covering things such as the avionics, air-to-air weapons, and other systems for that variant. The chapters are lavishly illustrated with mostly color photographs illustrating many of the squadrons that operated the Tomcat and each chapter includes a listing of the Bureau Numbers for that variant. When it was designed, Grumman assumed that the Tomcat, like the F-4 Phantom, would also be used as a bomber and even the original F-14As had air-to-ground systems incorporated, including a wing-sweep setting for "bomb", however it would be almost 20 years before this potential was tapped into. Mr. Evans devotes an entire chapter to the evolution/conversion of the Tomcat from a fleet interceptor/dogfighter into a true multi-role aircraft with the development of the "Bombcat". The chapter includes a lot of excellent photographs of different ordinance loads for the F-14. As expected, there is a separate chapter discussing Iran's purchase and employment of the F-14 with color photographs of several of the paint schemes applied to the Iranian Tomcats. The chapter also includes a brief discussion of F-14 operations in the Iraq-Iran war and Iran's efforts to find new air-to-air weapons to replace the AIM-54 Phoenix, including converting Hawk SAMs into air-to-air missiles. Next is a chapter on flying and fighting the Tomcat from an aircrew perspective which is accompanied by numerous photographs of the F-14 operating from carriers. This is followed by a chapter discussing the Tomcat's combat career from the Gulf of Sidra through operations in Afghanistan and Iraq. The final chapter discusses the retirement of the Tomcat in 2006 and the destruction of most of the airframes and spare parts to prevent Iran from obtaining spare parts for its Tomcat. There are seven pages of color side profiles and one of upper and lower views illustrating many of the paint schemes and squadron markings seen on the F-14 over the years. This section is followed by eight kit builds - 1 in 1/32, 2 in 1/72 and 5 in 1/48. The builds are excellent, impressive, and illustrate many different techniques and styles. Finally, there are 7 appendices covering things such as a walk-around of the aircraft, excerpts from the F-14 technical manuals, Tomcat colors, special test Tomcats, 1/72nd scale plans, and an extensive listing of Tomcat kits, accessories and decals. This book is good overview of the F-14 and its three variants and includes lots of great information and photographs. The color profiles and kit builds offer inspiration for some interesting aircraft and the walkaround photos will help those who must super-detail their gear wells and doors. I noted just a few errors in the text, such as stating the only squadrons that operated the F-14D were VF-2, VF-11 and VF-31 while including a lot of photographs of VF-213's F-14Ds, but they do not detract from the rest of the content. As I also own the original issue of SAM Publications Modeler's Data File on the F-14. I compared the two and noted that while there is some new material in this volume, primarily the kit builds and some of the appendices, most of the text and photographs in this volume are from the original volume, just re-arranged. I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in the F-14. However, if you own the prior volume you may want to peruse this new edition first to see if there is enough new information to make it worth your while. Thank you to SAM Publications for the review sample and to IPMS-USA for letting me review it. View the full article
  1. Load more activity
×
×
  • Create New...